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April 23, 2014 / 23 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Taiwan’

Israel Must Learn Taiwan Lesson and Grow Up

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

Nations have no permanent friends or allies, they only have permanent interests. Paraphrasing Lord Palmerston (Henry John Temple)

While Israel and the United States share some common, fundamental values, in reality, they have very different interests.

The most basic example is the Middle East.

America’s first priority in the region is to keep the oil flowing, and reduce reliance on any single country for that resource.

Israel’s top priority is survival.

Iran is the best example of where these differences come to a head.

Israel is rightfully worried that Iran wants to commit nuclear genocide against it. America, on the other hand, is not overly concerned about an Iranian attack, but would definitely like to see Iranian oil flowing into the U.S., while keeping Iran out of Russian hands.

It fits well into an American Middle East strategy, that Iran, whatever its regime, would have a working relationship with the U.S.

That doesn’t mean that the U.S. would destroy Israel to satisfy Iran, but the it has no problem with Israel paying a price in exchange for Iran’s friendship.

Think Jimmy Carter, China and Taiwan. Back in 1979, Carter switched his allegiance from Taiwan to the People’s Republic, practically overnight. It’s what superpowers do.

This leaves Israel in a dilemma.

Iran will get nuclear missiles, because it plans to get them – at all costs. The U.S. wants a rapprochement with Iran, and a few nuclear bombs aren’t going to stand in the way of that. Israel attacking Iran, on the other hand, would.

Israel doesn’t have too many initial options here.

Israel can pressure the U.S. Congress to try to reduce the size of the bus Israel gets pushed under. Israel can attack Iran alone, and pray that it’s strong enough, and be prepared to endure the consequences it will face from the U.S. and from an Iranian retaliation. Or Israel can keep its mouth shut, ride out the Obama storm, and be prepared to eventually face off with a nuclear Iran, with expansionist goals, protecting its proxies on Israel’s border with its nuclear umbrella.

There is another option that Israel can take.

Israel can grow up, and cut the American umbilical cord.

Israel needs to diversify.

It needs to go out and begin building better and deeper relationships with other strong countries – Russia included. It doesn’t need to cut its ties with the US, but it does need to end its complete reliance on the US, because Israel’s interests and US interests are not the same.

It doesn’t need to be big moves either. Simply buying some military from Russia would give Israel customer (not client) status, and that would change all the relationships. The US would also be faced with a choice, and pushing Israel under the bus would have consequences for the US in return.

Israel could then play those relationships off one another, just like the big boys do.

The U.S. had been holding back parts of Israel’s economy, specifically that of the military industry. Israel can begin selling its systems that compete with the US’s military industry. It’s well known that Israel’s war tech is superior, and selling a few major systems would do well for the Israeli economy.

And finally, Israel can apply Israeli law over Area C, and unilaterally declare that the price for a nuclear Iran, is an Israel with borders that we believe are needed for our protection, as well are historically and legally ours. The Arabs in Areas A are free to run their government and live their lives however they want, as long as they don’t attack us or attempt to harm us in any way.

Taiwan manages to thrive and grow, despite the Chinese shadow, and its president being persona non grata in Washington (even if it is now trying to build a relationship with China)

Israel has a lot more going for it than Taiwan.

A little growing up, and a little diversity never hurt anyone.

Visit The Muqata.

Taiwan Agrees to Cut Iran Oil Imports

Thursday, February 9th, 2012

Taiwan has agreed to examine the possibility of cutting its oil imports from Iran in response to US calls to join the international sanctions regime aimed at halting Iran’s nuclear program.

The US and the EU have been trying to persuade a list of countries – China, India, Japan, South Korea amongst them – to sign on to their ramped up-sanctions regime, which calls for an end to oil importing contracts with Iran by July 1, and a freezing of Iran Central Bank’s assets.

According to a Taiwanese national security official, his country would agree to a gradual decrease of crude oil imports from Iran, as Iran is one of Taiwan’s top sources of crude oil, at 6.8% of total imports.

Quick Takes: News You May Have Missed

Wednesday, July 27th, 2011

Obama Official Downplays China Threat
 
            President Obama’s China adviser, Evan Medeiros, has a long history of downplaying the threat to U.S. interests posed by Beijing’s rapid military and economic growth, once even penning a paper that argued China should embrace a “great power mentality.”
 
            Medeiros was appointed as China director of the White House National Security Council in 2009.
 
            In his most recent Inside the Ring column in the Washington Times, Bill Gertz cited congressional Republicans as identifying Medeiros as a key player involved in the Obama administration’s policy of refusing to sell needed arms to Taiwan.
 
            The same report blamed Medeiros for delaying the release of a second Pentagon report to Congress on the shifting air power balance in the Taiwan Strait.
 
            The Times also cited Republican staff aides and a defense official as stating they believe Medeiros is behind efforts to block the release to Congress of the Pentagon’s annual report on Chinese military power, completed months ago and due to Capitol Hill on March 1.
 
            Medeiros was fingered by Gertz’s sources as a key official in preventing the U.S. sale of 66 advanced F-16 jets to Taiwan and for delaying the sale of equipment to upgrade Taiwan’s existing F-16s. Both military moves were expected to anger China.
 
            A review by this column of Medeiros’s articles and statements to the news media finds a regular trend of minimizing China’s threat to the U.S.
 
            In 2009, just before his appointment to the NSC, Medeiros stated China was not seeking to “confront the United States or expel it from the region.” He argued China was not aiming to replace America as a superpower.
 
            In 2007, Medeiros, speaking as an expert at the RAND Corporation, argued Beijing’s military buildup is limited to Asia and it has not sought to project power globally.
 
            In 2005, Medeiros said of China’s People’s Liberation Army: “Do the old shibboleths still apply – that the Chinese defense industry is backward, poor and low-quality?”
 
            “No,” he continued. “It seems China has turned the corner. For the first time in 20 years, the PLA has adopted reforms that make sense. They adopted, and implemented, and are really learning quickly.”
 
            Medeiros that year was lead author of a 300-page RAND study, “New Directions for China’s Defense Industry.”
 
            In 2002, he minimized China’s missile project, telling The Economist that the Chinese “don’t really see missiles as weapons of mass destruction while most American policymakers equate the two.”
 
            In an article in the November-December 2003 issue of Foreign Affairs magazine, Medeiros, with analyst M. Taylor Fravel, presented the views of experts on Chinese foreign policy as stating China should overcome its long-held ‘victim mentality’ and adopt a ‘great power mentality’ instead.
 

                    Soros-Funded Groups Call For Investigating Murdoch Companies

 
            A slew of organizations funded by billionaire George Soros have been utilizing the alleged News of the World phone hacking scandal in the UK to call for investigations of News Corporation’s U.S. interests, particularly Fox News Channel.
 
            The Center for American Progress, heavily financed by Soros, said it gathered 12,000 signatures demanding to know whether News Corp. reporters violated U.S. law by obtaining phone records in the U.S.
 
            The center is reportedly highly influential in helping to craft White House policy. It is led by John Podesta, who served as co-chairman of Obama’s presidential transition team.
 
            Already, Podesta’s signature drive was cited as part of the motivation for Democratic Sens. Jay Rockefeller and Barbara Boxer sending a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder requesting an investigation into claims News Corp. may have hacked the phones of 9/11 victims.
 
            The center’s offshoot, Think Progress, has been leading Twitter and Facebook campaigns calling for investigations into Rupert Murdoch’s U.S. media empire.
 
            Think Progress even alleged News Corp. could have been involved in the November 2009 e-mail hacking of a climate research institute that showed climate scientists conspiring to rig data in an effort to demonstrate the veracity of global warming.
 
            Perhaps at the center of the drive against News Corp. sits the Soros-funded Media Matters for America.
 
            When Soros donated $1 million to Media Matters last October, he specifically cited the group’s work against Fox News as the driving force for his financial contribution.
 
            AFL-CIO Backs Controversial Nominee
 
            The AFL-CIO, the nation’s largest union, expressed strong support for President Obama’s nominee to head a new agency purportedly charged with protecting consumers from financial fraud.
 
            The nominee, former Ohio Attorney General Richard Cordray, was the subject of national news in 2008 when he used public funds for the legal defense of three former state employees accused of accessing personal information of Joe Wurzelbacher, also known as “Joe the Plumber.”
 
            Wurzelbacher rose to fame during that year’s presidential campaign after he was videotaped questioning Obama about the candidate’s small-business tax policy during a campaign stop in Ohio.
 
            The new governmental agency is called the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.
 
            According to its website, the agency seeks to “make markets for consumer financial products and services work for Americans – whether they are applying for a mortgage, choosing among credit cards, or using any number of other consumer financial products.”
 

           

            Aaron Klein is Jerusalem bureau chief and senior reporter for WorldNetDaily.com. He is also host of an investigative radio program on New York’s 770-WABC Radio, the largest talk radio station in the U.S., every Sunday between 2-4 p.m.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/quick-takes-news-you-may-have-missed-104/2011/07/27/

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