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November 25, 2015 / 13 Kislev, 5776
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Technion’

Harvard, Stanford, MIT top 2015 Shanghai Ranking, Hebrew U 67th, Technion 18th in CS

Sunday, August 16th, 2015

(JNi.media) Harvard University is still number one in the world, for the 13th year, in the 2015 Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) released on Saturday by the Center for World-Class Universities at Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

Harvard is followed by Stanford, MIT, Berkeley, Cambridge, Princeton, Caltech, Columbia, Chicago and Oxford. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem ranks 67th, after having dropped in 2014 from 59th to 70th place.

The Technion-Israel Institute of Technology is ranked 18th in the world in computer science in 2015.

Starting in 2003, ARWU has been presenting the world Top 500 universities annually, based on a set of objective indicators and third-party data. It is considered a trustworthy source, using six objective indicators to rank world universities, including the number of alumni and staff winning Nobel prizes and Fields medals; the number of highly cited researchers; the number of articles published in journals of nature and science; the number of articles indexed in Science Citation Index – Expanded and Social Sciences Citation Index, and per capita performance.

More than 1200 universities are ranked by ARWU every year and the best 500 scores are published.

The Technion is in 77th place on the list of world academic institutions. Tel Aviv University ranks between 151-200, alongside Weizmann Institute of Science. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev ranks between 401-500.

Haifa University did not make the top 500 institutions.

Yeshiva University was ranked between 201-300. Yeshiva’s ranking has been on a steady decline in the Shanghai ranking, down from the 100-200 band in 2003-4. The only area where Yeshiva has retained its 151-200 ranking in 2015 is clinical medicine and pharmacy.

The top world academic institution in natural sciences and mathematics in 2015 is the University of California, Berkeley, followed by Harvard, Princeton and Stanford Universities. The Technion ranks in the 51-75 band, together with Hebrew University and the Weizmann Institute of Science. Tel Aviv University ranks in the 101-150 band.

The top world academic institution in computer science in 2015 is Stanford University, followed by MIT, UC Berkeley, Harvard, Princeton, Carnegie Mellon, the University of Texas at Austin, Cornell, UCLA, and USC.

The 18th ranked Technion is followed by Tel Aviv University which ranks 20th in computer science, and the Hebrew U and Weizmann which are in the 76-100 band in the same category. Ben-Gurion is in the 101-150 band. Bar-Ilan University is in the 151-200 band in computer science.

Bloomberg Donates $100 Million to Cornell Campus of Technion University

Thursday, June 18th, 2015

Former Mayor Michael Bloomberg has donated the foundation carrying his name is donating $100 million towards a $2 billion the Cornell Tech campus on Roosevelt Island, which is being developed with Israel’s Technion University.

The new campus is scheduled to open in 2017 and move from the small and temporary location since the Cornell-Technion project began two years ago. The new campus, to be called Bloomberg Center will cover 12 acres and accommodate approximately 2,000 students.

Cornell teamed up with Technion despite protests that the Ivy League university was tacitly supporting the “occupation.”

Qualcomm Co-Founder Donates $50 Million to Technion

Monday, June 15th, 2015

Qualcomm cofounder Prof. Andrew Viterbi said he is donating $50 million to the Faculty of Electrical Engineering at the Technion.

Viterbi, a native of Italy who grew up in the United States, has donated to Technion in the past, but the new grant makes him the university’s largest private donor.

This is not Viterbi’s first donation to the Technion, but it is his largest.

He co-founded the Qualcomm chip company and invented the Viterbi Algorithm for decoding signals.

Prof. Viterbi’s visisted and lectured at Technion in 1967, when he was on Sabbatical from UCLA, and he was granted an honorary Doctorate in 2000, when also was named a Technion Distinguished Visiting Professor of Electrical Engineering.

Technion President Prof. Peretz Lavie said:

This is the greatest honor for a professor at the Technion, and has been granted up until now to only six people, three of whom were Nobel Prize winners. The degree enables Viterbi to come to the Technion whenever he wants, and there was a period when he visited here every year.

Viterbi said after announcing the latest donation, “Technion electrical engineering graduates are in large part responsible for creating and sustaining Israel’s high-tech industry, which has been essential for Israel’s economic success.”
Technion graduates have been responsible for founding and managing 1,602 high-tech companies, he added.
The grant will enable Technion to enlarge the Faculty of Electrical Engineering.

Technion Scientists Reach Breakthrough in Cancer Study

Monday, April 13th, 2015

Israeli scientists are closer than ever to finding a way to beat back cancer at the Technion Israel Institute of Technology. The findings of the new study were published last week in the journal CELL.

The researchers discovered two cancer-suppressing proteins, according to information released via PR Newswire. They carried out the study in the world-famous laboratory of Nobel Prize laureate Professor Aaron Ciechanover, president of the Israel Cancer Society.

The team was led by research associate Dr. Yelena Dravtsova-Ivantsiv and worked together with physicians from Rambam, Carmel and Hadassah Medical Centers, all of whom are studying tumors and their treatments.

KPC1 – a vital pathway in the life of the cell – is responsible for the degradation of defective proteins that could damage the cell if not removed. The system tags these defective proteins and send them to the proteasome cellular complex to be destroyed.

The system also removes functional and healthy proteins that are no longer needed, thus regulating the processes the proteins control.

By the time a protein reaches the proteasome system it is already broken down but there are exceptions.

This study examined “p105” – a long precursor of a key regulator in a cell called “NF-kB” which has been identified as a link between inflammation and cancer.

The first person to suggest such a link was Dr. Rudolph Virchow, a German pathologist, in 1863. His research has been repeatedly confirmed over the years, and since the discovery of NF-kB 30 years ago, there have been many articles linking the cell to malignant transformation in tumors in various parts of the body.

The current research is focused on deciphering the decision-making mechanism that determines which process will be applied to the NF-kB cell. There are two, both connected to the “ubiquitin system” which produces a protein that greatly restricts the development of cancerous tumors.

1. Either a “ubiquitin” system component called KPC1 becomes involved and attaches ubiquitin to p105, thus shortening the protein to become “p50” ; or 2. Ubiquitination is mediated without KPC1 and instead by another component in the system, and p105 is degraded and destroyed completely.

In other words, the presence of high levels of KPC1 and p50 would mean the malignant growth is suppressed and healthy tissue appears to be protected, according to the present findings in the study.

The current research was conducted on lab mice as well as samples of human tumors. A strong connection was found between the suppression of malignancy and the level of the two proteins.

Professor Aaron Ciechanover, president of the Israel Cancer Society, noted that many more years will be required “to establish the research and gain a solid understanding of the mechanisms behind the suppression of the tumors. The development of a drug based on this discovery is a possibility, although not a certainty, and the road to such a drug is long and far from simple.”

Ciechanover won the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 2004, together with Professors Avram Hershko (also from Technion) and Irwin Rose of the Fox Chase Cancer Center, for the discovery of the ubiquitin system. The current line of research is a continuation of that work.

Technion’s Rube Goldberg Machine Passover Seder

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

AOL Partners with Cornell Tech to Fund New Labs in New York, Israel

Sunday, November 16th, 2014

NEW YORK (JTA) — A graduate school cofounded by Cornell University and Israel’s Technion is launching a research lab with money it received from the AOL Internet media corporation.

The New York City-based Jacobs Technion-Cornell Institute (part of the Cornell NYC Tech graduate school), which was born out of a 2011 collaboration between the upstate New York university and the Haifa one, announced the new lab’s opening on Wednesday.

The lab, called “Connected Experiences,” or ConnX, will last four years and is funded by a “multimillion” dollar gift from AOL. The exact amount was not disclosed.

The lab will operate in both Israel and New York, and will allow researchers to explore technologies in areas including communication and coordination, food and wellness, education and safety, and information and entertainment.

“The partnership with AOL will allow Cornell Tech and Technion researchers access to resources — platforms and engineering and product knowledge — that is not readily available in academic settings,” said Dan Huttenlocher, dean of Cornell Tech, in a statement.

The gift also supports a fellowship program for graduate students, half of them to be female, in New York and Israel. Faculty in the new ConnX lab will include Shiri Azenkot and Serge Belongie at Cornell Tech, and Anat Rafaeli, Nir Ailon and Roi Reichart at Technion.

North American Medical Students Thrive in Diverse Region

Monday, June 9th, 2014

The sunny shore of Haifa’s bay usually imbues images of ships, sand and thoughts of carefree days. Yet gowns of black and green dotted the periphery, as many new physicians received their coveted diplomas and entered the medical profession.  The unique location of these rigorous studies aided to the nature of the student body, captured in the commencement ceremony.

Students, parents and friends filled the auditorium in the main campus of Technion, Israel’s leading technical university often dubbed the MIT of the Middle East, for the TeAMS class of 2014’s culminating ceremony. Dr. Andy Levy, dean of the overseas medical program reflected on this year’s graduating class. “The class has excelled in maintaining an environment at the medical school where students achieved academic strides in every measurable parameter,” Levy stated. Rooted in an atmosphere of professionalism, the students maintained a sense of camaraderie throughout the stressful years of medical school, often burning the midnight oil in group study sessions and communal meals.

The class of 2014 scored impeccably well in their match results, setting a very high standard for the program. Students placed in conventionally difficult specialties in residencies affiliated with the most prestigious programs in the United States; including Harvard University’s Mount Auburn Hospital, New York Presbyterian Hospital of Cornell University, University of Pittsburgh, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Mayo Clinic and Cleveland Clinic, among numerous others.

Aside from high test scores and impressive placements, the graduates at TeAMS had the unique opportunity to engage in their first practical medical encounters with varied and diverse populations. TeAMS’ students receive their initial exposures to rounds and medicine “on the job” at Rambam Health Care Campus, which has more than 2,130,000 people in their regional span. At least 1,175,000 of these people are Jewish, while 655,000 are Muslim, 123,000 are Christian, 123,000 are Druze and another 75,000 are not affiliated with a religion.

Students at TeAMS gained exposure to diverse sectarian groups first hand, as they practiced on patients from differing backgrounds, an experience which has affected many.

As Olivia Diamond New York native and class of 2014 graduate explained, “We were immersed almost immediately into the goings-on of hospital life. We got to watch procedures and shadow doctors on their rounds.” Diamond waves farewell to Haifa as she departs for Harvard University’s Mount Auburn Hospital to begin her residency in internal medicine.

Josh Gelleris, class of 2014 and California native, explained that coming to a different region affected him on a personal level. “One of the reasons I chose to study in Israel was so that I could experience a new culture,” Gelleris said. “I believed that studying in a new place would give me the opportunity to add a dimension to my educational experience that I thought would be important to my personal development.” Gelleris leaves Israel to begin his residency in internal medicine at New York Presbyterian Hospital of Cornell University.

At the commencement ceremony, Dr.Levy mirrored these sentiments by stressing the importance of treating each patient compassionately, no matter what their background. As Dr. Levy said, “I would like to bless each of you with a peace within yourselves, strive always to work to increase hope and strengthen your patients, not only physically through the knowledge you have accumulated but also by caring for them with empathy.”

Alexis Steinberg, originating from Canada and valedictorian for TeAMS class of 2014, described how exposure to this multicultural experience has influenced her outlook. “As physicians, our job entails more than just prescribing medications, especially since many diseases cannot be cured. In chronic diseases like, Alzheimer’s, ischemic heart disease, and diabetes mellitus, we are either just improving symptoms or increasing the quality of life for a patient. So, we need to really understand who the patient is in order to perform the art of healing, something that was conveyed to us while living in a foreign land.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/north-american-medical-students-thrive-in-diverse-region/2014/06/09/

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