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July 1, 2016 / 25 Sivan, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Technion’

#TechnionChallenge Winners Announcement with Jewish Day School Student Reactions

Wednesday, April 27th, 2016

In 2016, RAVSAK and the Technion challenged Jewish Day School students around the world to create a Rube Goldberg machine that tells the story of Passover.

Here is the video announcement of the four winning schools and the students’ reactions.

In the closely contested High School category, first place went to the team from Abraham Joshua Heschel High School, in New York City. The judges cited their use of successful energy transfer elements and high creativity level as main reasons for their selection. Second place went to The Weber School in Atlanta, whose entry showed a true understanding for the mechanics involved to create a visually stunning display.

There was a tie for first place in the Middle School category. The entry from the 7th grade team from Bialik College, in Melbourne, Australia, was well-thought out, with many different types of energy transfers – some of which were very unusual for Rube Goldberg machines. The submission of the 6th grade team from Scheck Hillel Community School (North Miami Beach, Florida) was lauded for its creativity, and for energy transfer aspects that were executed properly and efficiently.

Video of the Day

Passover Pesach Technion 2016 Breakdance High Tech Haggadah

Monday, April 25th, 2016

Video of the Day

Technion Rabbi Arrested at Temple Mount

Monday, April 25th, 2016

Rabbi Dr. Elad Dukov of the Technion Institute of Technology in Haifa was arrested Monday afternoon, according to the Tazpit Press Service (TPS).

Dukov was taken into custody by Israeli security forces at the Temple Mount in the Old City of Jerusalem, leaving five children stranded by themselves on the site, TPS reported.

The circumstances behind the rabbi’s arrest are not clear.

Last week, Rabbi Yehuda Glick of the Temple Mount Heritage Foundation and Rabbi Yisrael Ariel of The Temple Institute were both arrested while visiting the site.

Thirteen visitors were detained Sunday while visiting the ancient site where both Jewish Holy Temples of Jerusalem once stood, 12 of them Jews. The Temple Mount is the holiest site on earth in Judaism, and the third holiest site in Islam.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Israeli Scientists Find Protein in Blood to ID Alzheimer’s Disease

Tuesday, February 9th, 2016

Researchers at Tel Aviv University, Technion, Rambam Medical Center and Harvard University discovered a new biomarker to identify cognitive aging and Alzheimer’s disease.

The new study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, found that levels of “activity-dependent neuroprotective protein” (ADNP) can be easily monitored in routine blood tests. Moreover, ADNP levels in blood tests correlate with higher IQ in healthy older adults.

The research was led by Prof. Illana Gozes, the incumbent of the Lily and Avraham Gildor Chair for the Investigation of Growth Factors. She is also former director of the Adams Super Center for Brain Studies at TAU’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine and a member of TAU’s Sagol School of Neuroscience. It was also spearheaded by Dr. Gad Marshall, Dr. Aaron Schultz, and Prof. Reisa Sperling of Harvard University, and Prof. Judith Aharon-Peretz of Rambam Medical Center – The Technion Institute of Technology. TAU PhD student Anna Malishkevich also participated in working with the team.

Investigators analyzed blood samples taken from 42 healthy adults, MCI (mild cognitive impairment) patients and Alzheimer’s disease patients at Rambam Medical Center in Israel. After comparing the DNP expression in the blood samples, the researchers prepared plasma samples and once again compared the protein levels.

Significant increases in ADNP RNA were seen in patients ranging from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer’s disease. ADNP levels tested in plasma and serum samples, as well as white blood cell RNA levels, distinguished between cognitively normal elderly, MCI and Alzheimer’s disease participants.

“This study has provided the basis to detect this biomarker in routine, non-invasive blood tests, and it is known that early intervention is invaluable to Alzheimer’s patients,” Gozes said.

“We are now planning to take these preliminary findings forward into clinical trials — to create a pre-Alzheimer’s test that will help to tailor potential preventative treatments. We have found a clear connection between ADNP levels in the blood and amyloid plaques in the brain,” she said.

The researchers are currently exploring larger clinical trials to better determine the ability of ADNP to predict cognitive decline and disease progression.

Hana Levi Julian

Israeli Scientists Warn Men ‘Less Talk’ on Cell Phones

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2016

Scientists at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology and the Carmel Medical Center are warning men there is a risk in speaking on cell phones for more than an hour daily.

According to a new study, the sperm count dropped to levels below the fertility rate in men who used their mobile phones for more than an hour a day. The team studied the cell phone usage of men who were referred for semen analysis, and the connection between the two.

Speaking on a cell phone while it is charging, or speaking on the device for more than an hour a day doubled the risk for low sperm count, the study found.

Researchers at the two institutions published the findings Tuesday in the medical journal Reproductive BioMedicine Online. The team was led by Dr. Ariel Zilberlicht of the Carmel Medical Center.

The findings indicated the sperm counts dropped among men who held their cell phones approximately two feet or less from their groins while speaking or charging.

Abnormally low sperm counts were recorded among 47 percent of those who kept their phones in their pants pockets throughout the day, in comparison to only 11 percent of the general male population.

Sperm quality is the determining factor in 40 percent of the cases involving couples struggling with fertility in the Western world, according to the researchers. The quality of sperm among men in Western nations is dropping; these findings increase the concern that galloping technological advances may only be adding to the problem.

Numerous researchers and technicians now recommend consumers turn off their cell phone while charging the device, and use a headset or headphones as much as possible.

Hana Levi Julian

Technology and Tikkun Olam: Israel Paves the Way

Thursday, September 3rd, 2015

Decades have passed since Israelis invented a modernized drip irrigation to maximize limited water supply and make desert bloom, yet Israeli curiosity, drive and ingenuity toward excellence continues to thrive. Israelis are determined to lead in solving some of the most pressing humanitarian challenges. Working on the precepts of tikkun olam, Israel persists at the forefront of innovation, seeking to make life better for all. Just one avenue where Israel excels is health and medicine.

Nearly 1 billion people in developed countries consider emergency response expensive and delayed, while upwards of 6 billion people in the developing world simply lack access to any sort of emergence response. In cases of accidents, terror attacks or other medical emergencies, people are likely to die or suffer serious injuries because of a lack of proper response. With its unfortunate and long history of facing terror attacks, Israel has honed in on effective emergency response techniques to save lives quicker.

In Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, like in most major cities, ambulances typically get stuck in traffic and cannot arrive fast enough. Following the Second Intifada, a group of young ambulance medics watched too many people die because aid was unavailable. So they envisioned a solution, where medics could be notified according to their proximity to a reported incident. Equipped with medical supplies, they could rush over and stabilize victims within the minutes before the ambulance arrives. This model, now called United Hatzalah, dropped response times to under three minutes.

“We took chutzpah and ran with it,” said Eli Beer, founder of United Hatzalah of Israel. Since officially formalized in 2006, United Hatzalah has recruited over 2,500 trained volunteer medics to join the movement of community-based lifesaving. To fuel the program, the organization worked with Israeli startup NowForce to develop the LifeCompass app, an integrated GPS-powered system that records incidents, alerts nearby medics and guides them to arrive to the scene quickly.

In addition to the app, United Hatzalah has crafted and deployed customized ambulance motorcycles to weave through traffic. This “ambucycle” is stocked with medical equipment and works in tandem with LifeCompass. By way of practical ingenuity, United Hatzalah’s community-based emergency response model has exceled in cutting response time and attending to more people who need critical care. United Hatzalah dispatchers received 245,000 calls last year, nearly a quarter of which are considered life-threatening situations.

Hooked on their effective program, United Hatzalah representatives have traveled the globe sharing their knowledge and experience. “We have taken what we have learned in Israel and begun sharing it with others, because we know that we can help solve this world-wide challenge,” said Beer.

In July, Beer and Dov Maisel, vice president of international projects, traveled to Dubai to present the model to delegates from several developing countries. This model has been deployed in places like India, Lithuania, Argentina and Panama, and recently made its debut in the United States, with Jersey City into the United Rescue initiative.

While sharing tools and techniques with the world has huge merit, teaching and inspiring others to better the world is even more valuable, as Jewish proverbs explain. Israeli institutions are famed as major research centers and engaged in Israel’s role as the “Start-Up Nation.” At the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, innumerable cutting-edge research and innovation have been born in the halls of the Rappaport Faculty of Medicine.

“Ask any researcher or academic in medicine anywhere in the world and they will tell you that Israelis are world-class, first-class innovators,” said Dr. Debra Kiez, an emergency medicine clinician based in Toronto. Kiez also lectures at the Technion’s American Medical School program (TEAMS) on how to bridge Israeli and American medical systems. “Israel is doing a large amount in medicine and science with very little; as a small yet impressive country, Israelis have a huge ability to discover, learn, innovate, research and teach,” said Kiez, who has worked in Canada, the U.S. and Israel.

“Hospitals and medical schools in Israel are rich learning environments … because people in Israel have learned how to maximize what they can do with very little,” she said.

TEAMS educates America’s future doctors, giving them hands on experience in a rigorous clinical setting while studying under top Israeli physicians and researchers. Graduates land residencies at top programs across North America and go on to successful and impactful careers as physicians, educators and researchers.

Like most American alumni from the Technion medical school, Dr. Samantha Jagger, now a cardiologist at AdvantageCare Physicians in Brooklyn, studied under Nobel Prize winners and stays connected to Israel by following all the published medical research.

“When I was a student at the Technion, I saw the first PillCam being tested during my rotations,” said Jagger. “Now it’s a routine practice everywhere!” Jagger added that there is a special ablation procedure used to solve rhythmic problems in the heart developed in Israel that she and her colleagues use frequently.

Dr. Jason Brookman, a 2004 graduate of TEAMS currently working as a fellowship program director and assistant professor in anesthesia at Johns Hopkins University, said his experience in medical school was “a stepping stone for the rest of his career.”

“Medical school is the foundation, like a background in a good painting, we paint as broadly as possible. With each additional training or residency, our medical careers get refined with smaller brush strokes. The nitty gritty details of medical practice rely on a solid foundation in medical school,” he explained.

Most of the benefits of studying in Israel is getting to learn from world-class experts while in a very diverse setting. As a small country with an extremely diverse population, Israeli doctors serve a wide range of people, with each population bringing unique diseases and cultural tends into the fold, said Kiez.

“My time at Technion and in Israel gave me a really deep cultural experience,” said Jagger. “I got a good understanding of how to deal with patients cross culturally, especially when you can’t necessarily communicate in their language.” Now working with Asian and Spanish speaking patients, she has implemented the skills and tools she garnered from working in Israeli hospitals teaching Russian, Arab and Ethiopian patients.

By combing top-class education and rich life experiences, Israeli medical school students are bridging the world, serving also as a light bringing positive healing into the world.

Daniela Berkowitz

Harvard, Stanford, MIT top 2015 Shanghai Ranking, Hebrew U 67th, Technion 18th in CS

Sunday, August 16th, 2015

(JNi.media) Harvard University is still number one in the world, for the 13th year, in the 2015 Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) released on Saturday by the Center for World-Class Universities at Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

Harvard is followed by Stanford, MIT, Berkeley, Cambridge, Princeton, Caltech, Columbia, Chicago and Oxford. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem ranks 67th, after having dropped in 2014 from 59th to 70th place.

The Technion-Israel Institute of Technology is ranked 18th in the world in computer science in 2015.

Starting in 2003, ARWU has been presenting the world Top 500 universities annually, based on a set of objective indicators and third-party data. It is considered a trustworthy source, using six objective indicators to rank world universities, including the number of alumni and staff winning Nobel prizes and Fields medals; the number of highly cited researchers; the number of articles published in journals of nature and science; the number of articles indexed in Science Citation Index – Expanded and Social Sciences Citation Index, and per capita performance.

More than 1200 universities are ranked by ARWU every year and the best 500 scores are published.

The Technion is in 77th place on the list of world academic institutions. Tel Aviv University ranks between 151-200, alongside Weizmann Institute of Science. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev ranks between 401-500.

Haifa University did not make the top 500 institutions.

Yeshiva University was ranked between 201-300. Yeshiva’s ranking has been on a steady decline in the Shanghai ranking, down from the 100-200 band in 2003-4. The only area where Yeshiva has retained its 151-200 ranking in 2015 is clinical medicine and pharmacy.

The top world academic institution in natural sciences and mathematics in 2015 is the University of California, Berkeley, followed by Harvard, Princeton and Stanford Universities. The Technion ranks in the 51-75 band, together with Hebrew University and the Weizmann Institute of Science. Tel Aviv University ranks in the 101-150 band.

The top world academic institution in computer science in 2015 is Stanford University, followed by MIT, UC Berkeley, Harvard, Princeton, Carnegie Mellon, the University of Texas at Austin, Cornell, UCLA, and USC.

The 18th ranked Technion is followed by Tel Aviv University which ranks 20th in computer science, and the Hebrew U and Weizmann which are in the 76-100 band in the same category. Ben-Gurion is in the 101-150 band. Bar-Ilan University is in the 151-200 band in computer science.

JNi.Media

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/harvard-stanford-mit-top-2015-shanghai-ranking-hebrew-u-67th-technion-18th-in-cs/2015/08/16/

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