web analytics
April 17, 2014 / 17 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Tel Aviv’

Israeli Museum Names Hall for US Fugitive Kobi Alexander

Monday, December 30th, 2013

Only in Israel.

The Eretz Israel Museum in Tel Aviv is naming a hall after U.S. fugitive and former Comverse technology CEO Kobi Alexander, who along with his sister donated money for renovating the museum’s Glass Pavilion, now called the Shaula and Kobi Alexander Center.

Alexander, a native of Israel, fled to Namibia in 2006 after being indicted in the United States for fraud and still is wanted by the American government. Nambia has no extradition treaty with the United States.

The Eretz Israel Museum said it asked Alexander for a donation, and Globes reported that museum director Ilan Cohen said, “I welcome the connection with the Alexander family that has donated to the museum over the years. His father Tzvi Alexander donated his important and rare stamp collection to the museum.”

As for naming a hall after a fugitive,  he stated, “There are no criteria for naming buildings for people.”

The Eretz Israel Museum is one of the largest in the country and includes exhibits of archeology, ethnography, stamps, folklore, Judaica, traditional crafts, popular art, cultural history, and local identity.

An archaeological site dating back more 3,000 years is in the center of the museum.

Second Rocket Attack Aimed at Ashkelon a Warm-up for Tel Aviv

Thursday, December 26th, 2013

Gaza terrorists have fired their second rocket in 24 hours on the Ashkelon coastal region in the umpteenth round of a gradual escalation of attacks on Israel that IDF commanders have said over and over are only a prelude to an assault on Tel Aviv.

No injuries or damage was reported Thursday night after Code Red early warning sirens wailed south of the port city of Ashkelon, home to strategic oil, gas and electric infrastructures.

A rocket last night hit the same area in what has been a rapid escalation of attacks from Gaza the past month. Sniper fire earlier this week killed an Israeli civilian working for the IDF on the security fence at Gaza, and the IDF immediately went into its usual mode of making headlines with attacks on terror targets, accompanied by the huffing and puffing of Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu that “we will strike those who attack us, and “there will be no immunity for anyone.”

Of course, that is really true only when the missiles threaten Tel Aviv, which is what set off Operation Case Lead exactly five years ago, and when the missiles actually hit Tel Aviv, as in November 2012, when the army launched the Pillar of Cloud counter-terrorist operation.

Every assault on the terrorist infrastructure in Gaza ends up in a draw. Israel halts fire, surrenders to international pressure to be a nice guy and encourages Hamas to make peace by allowing dual-purpose item such as concrete and metal to flow into the area.

The next step is that Hamas used the materials to build hospitals and schools, which are great shields when launching missiles that it also builds with the same materials.

The “calm” gives U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry an opportunity to plow ahead with his program for a piece of peace paper between the Palestinian Authority and Israel while Hamas uses the lull in violence to build bigger and better missiles.

While IDF scurried this week to move Iron Dome battery systems to protect Sderot and Be’er Sheva, the threat on Tel Aviv is not propaganda and is not imaginary.

Israel destroyed Iranian-made M-75 medium range missiles in 2012, but Amos Harel, military analyst for Haaretz, wrote Thursday that Hamas no longer has to depend on Iran. Gaza has its only military-industrial complex to boost the economy and produce made-in-Gaza missiles destined for metropolitan Tel Aviv.

“Israel must take into account that in the next conflict, if and when it breaks out, Hamas will present a more significant ability to hit the Greater Tel Aviv Area, even if it is still marginal as compared to the abilities of Hezbollah in Lebanon,” Harel wrote.

All it takes is one missile, God forbid, to hit a factory, office building or high-rise apartment building, and Game Over.

All of the calls by the international community for restraint won’t get past the Mediterranean Coast.

If all of this does not seem like déjà vu, guess when the following statement was made by  Maj. Gen. Tal Russo, who at the time was head of the Southern Command.

Another counter-terrorist operation in Gaza “depends on the other side. We are trying to enable residents of southern communities to live as normally as possible.”

He made the comment on March 26, 1911, between Cast Lead and Pillar of Cloud.

A year later, then IDF spokesman Brig. Gen. Mordechai said, “What will be different in the next war is the understanding that the IDF will need to operate a very large force at the start of the operation, and achieve objectives in as short a time as possible. The longer the operation goes on, the greater the challenge we encounter—also in terms of public opinion.”

Rocket-Proof Rail Station Opens in Sderot

Wednesday, December 25th, 2013

The new railway station in rocket-battered Sderot in southern Israel now is one of the safest places in town following its opening Tuesday afternoon.

The terminal was built with special reinforcements to protect passengers from Kassam rockets, thousands of which have exploded in the small city since the Oslo War, otherwise known as the Second Intifada, which broke out in 2000 and escalated with Israel’s expulsion of Jews and withdrawal of the IDF from nearby Gaza in 2005.

Sderot now is the southern tip of the rail line that extends from Tel Aviv to Ashkelon, and tracks are being built to sonnet it with Be’er Sheva.

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu attended Tuesday’s ceremony opening the station and declared that Sderot now is a”suburb of Tel Aviv.”

New Bird Observatory Coming to Tel Aviv

Sunday, December 22nd, 2013

A bird observatory is to be established in Ganei Yehoshua Park Complex, thanks to JNF Australia.

Bird singing in the heart of the “Non-Stop-City”: In the presence of KKL-JNF World Chairman Efi Stenzler, Tel Aviv-Jaffa’s Mayor Ron Huldai, and the Australian ambassador to Israel Dave Sharma, a cornerstone laying ceremony was held this week for the new bird observatory center that is planned to be built in the ‘Rosh Tzippor’ complex in Ganei Yehoshua.

The ‘Rosh Zippor’ complex is located at the geographical point where the Ayalon and Yarkon River meet.Iit is named ‘Rosh Tzippor’ (bird head) due to its shape of a bird’s head, which can be seen from an aerial view.

The bird observatory will be open and accessible to the general public without fencing, and allow a view of the waterfront. In addition, at the same place a guidance center will open, providing educational activities for children and residents, as well as tutorials regulated public tours.

The Establishment of ‘Rosh Tzippor’ was made possible thanks to the generous donations from the JNF Australia and major donors, the couple Mr. Mark San and Ms. Eva San.

Project cost is $2.3 million. Earthworks have begun on the site, with an estimated project inauguration for 2014.

The Keren Kayemet LeIsrael – Jewish National Fund (KKL-JNF), which gained an extensive experience in the field through its international bird watching site, Lake Hula, will operate the site. The ‘Rosh Tzippor’ center itself will be integrated in a green park that is found in the heart of an urban area, which is under the management company, Ganei Yehoshua of the Tel Aviv municipality the site already includes a bike path, playgrounds, game facilities, picnic tables, and a beautiful observation hill.

KKL-JNF indicated that the new bird observatory will “encourage educational activity that brings people closer to nature.”

Bird observatory plan, to be completed in 2014. Image Courtesy of KKL-JNF

Bird observatory plan, to be completed in 2014. Image Courtesy of KKL-JNF

Israel Loses Case to Gag Witness in Bank of China Terror Trial

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

An American family, whose son was killed in a suicide attack in Israel, has won its argument in a U.S. court against the Netanyahu administration that has been trying to muzzle testimony by a former intelligence officer.

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu formerly told the family of 16-year-old Daniel Wurtz that it supported letting Uri Shaya testify against the Bank of China, which is charged with having handled terrorists’ monetary transactions.

Wurtz and 10 others were killed in the attack in Tel Aviv in 2006.

The Mossad has helped the Wurtz family prepare its case, but the Israeli government last month made an about-face and told the court that testimony by Shaya might reveal state secrets.

Wurtz’ family in the lawsuit accused of surrendering to pressure from China, which happens to be Israel’s fourth largest lender.

“The complaint was filed only after the GOI (Government of Israel) repeatedly assured my attorneys that it would provide cooperation and support for our allegations,” Daniel’s father, Yekutiel Wultz, said in a written declaration, Reuters reported.

Jerusalem Light Rail System Back in Operation but Woes Pile Up

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

Jerusalem’s light rail system is back in operation for the first time since the “snowstorm of the century” shut it down and crippled the capital last Thursday, but the city’s problems are far from over.

Thousands of cars are blocked in by plowed snow, and pedestrians often walk in the middle of the street instead of on icy sidewalks, creating worse traffic jams than usual. However, the municipality’s parking police have no problem pounding the sidewalks to hand out parking tickets.

The entrance to Jerusalem from the Tel Aviv highway is heavily congested because of thousands of Israelis from “snowless” regions who have flocked to the city to get a glimpse of the white stuff, much of which now is black from car exhausts.

Parents are up in arms over a Jerusalem education official’s request to school principals that students help clear snow so that all schools can open.

Nurses and other hospital staff have been working 12-hour shifts to ease the problem of transportation, especially in the late evening and early morning when streets are icy.

Ritz-Carlton Opens Hotel in Israel, Rents Suite for $2,500 a Night

Monday, December 16th, 2013

Israeli hotels have literally gone ritzy with this week’s opening of the $175 million Ritz-Carlton hotel in Herzliya adjacent to Tel Aviv, on Sunday. Rooms are available anywhere from $300 to $2500 a night, and its restaurant is kosher.

The Waldorf Astoria won will follow suit with the opening of its luxury hotel between Jerusalem’s Old City and the downtown area.

“The Ritz-Carlton chain is happy to open its first hotel in Israel and provide its guests from all over the world the opportunity to enjoy the service whose name precedes it and the award-winning guest experience,” said Ritz-Carlton president Hervé Humler.

Precipitation in Jerusalem 50% of Annual Amount

Sunday, December 15th, 2013

Torrential rains and the “snowstorm of the century” last week have left Jerusalem with 51 percent of its annual amount of precipitation, according to observations by the Israeli Meteorological Service, and the winter has barely begun.

Be’er Sheva, where many areas still are flooded, now has accumulated 63 percent of is annual rainfall and more than double the amount for this time of year.

Rainfall so this year in metropolitan Tel Aviv is 44-50 percent of its annual average, and Tiberias, which borders the Kinneret (Sea of Galilee), has received 131 percent of the usual rainfall for this time of year and one-third of its annual average.

Most of Israel’s precipitation usually falls from late December to early March. No more rain is in sight until early next week.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/precipitation-in-jerusalem-50-of-annual-amount/2013/12/15/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: