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October 25, 2016 / 23 Tishri, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Temple Mount’

Sound of the Kohen Gadol’s Golden Bell Rings Again in Jerusalem [video]

Monday, October 10th, 2016

As we enter the final hours of the day before Yom Kippur, archaelogist Eli Shukrun posted news on Facebook of a unique, tiny power-packed find in Jerusalem five years ago to remind the Jewish People of our ancient heritage and the future still to come.

A golden bell that belonged on the garment of the Kohen Gadol who served in the Holy Temple of Jerusalem was discovered in an excavation near the Western Wall.

Shukrun, who notes the find is of tremendous significance to the Jewish world, returned to the area to demonstrate once more with an expert audiologist, as she put it, the “only archaeological discovery that was ever in the Holy of Holies.”

In 2011, archaeologists in the City of David uncovered the little golden bell with a small buttonhole.

At that time, Shukrun and fellow archaeologist Ronny Reich announced, “It appears the bell was sewn on the garment of a man of high standing in Jerusalem at the end of the Second Temple period (1 CE).”

It appeared to be possible the bell could have fallen from the hem of the garment of the High Priest who served in the Holy Temple of Jerusalem.

The archaeologists took the little bell for analysis, and were able to recreate the sound it made two millennia ago.

That is when all 72 were sewn on to the beautiful blue tunic, the me’il techelet, of the Kohen Gadol, together with the lovely woven pomegranates along the hem of the garment worn by the High Priest when he entered the Holy of Holies in the Temple just one day in the year – on Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement of the Jewish People.

“And you shall make the robe of the ephod completely of blue wool. Its opening at the top shall be turned inward; its opening shall have a border around it, the work of a weaver. It shall have [an opening] like the opening of a coat of armor; it shall not be torn. And on its bottom hem you shall make pomegranates of blue, purple, and crimson wool, on its bottom hem all around, and golden bells in their midst all around. A golden bell and a pomegranate, a golden bell and a pomegranate, on the bottom hem of the robe, all around. It shall be on Aharon when he performs the service, and its sound shall be heard when he enters the Holy before HaShem and when he leaves, so that he will not die.” Exodus 28:31-35

On Tuesday at sundown, the Land of Israel and the State of Israel will come to a complete halt as Yom Kippur, the most sacred day in the Hebrew calendar begins.

Each member of the House of Israel enters his or her own personal Holy of Holies to make a “heshbon nefesh,” a personal inventory to atone for the sins committed against God during the past year, abstaining from all food and drink, intimate relations and the wearing of cosmetics, perfumes, or leather for 26 hours. This is done to underscore the gravity of the day.

May all in the House of Israel be inscribed and sealed in the Book of Life for a sweet, healthy, and prosperous year, materially and spiritually.

Hana Levi Julian

Temple Mount Closed to Jews On the Eve of Rosh Hashana, Due to Minor Islamic Holiday

Thursday, September 29th, 2016

Israel Police have announced that the Temple Mount will be closed to Jews this coming Sunday, the eve of Rosh Hashana.

Temple Mount activists condemned the decision, which they called another “surrender to the terrorists.”

A police notice tacked on the door to the Temple Mount Thursday morning said: “As is done each year, the Temple Mount will be closed to visitors on Rosh Hashana HaHajira, the Al-Hijra (1Muharram) New Year’s Day.

Al-Hijra, marks the Hegira in 622 CE, when the prophet Mohammed, founder of Islam, moved from Mecca to Medina and established the first Islamic state, marking the beginning of Islam as a monotheistic community.

It is celebrated as the Islamic New Year, but doesn’t rate as high as the two major religious festivals on the Islamic calendar, Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha. According to the BBC, there are no specific religious rituals required on this day.

Nevertheless, this coming Sunday evening also marks the start of the Jewish new year and is the second holiest day on the Hebrew calendar, surpassed only by Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, 10 days later.

Jews consider this a time of sanctification, rededication and renewal. For the Israeli government to decide to close the holiest site in all Judaism to Jews on this day, in deference to Muslim sensitivities, is a grave move indeed.

It is important to note, however, that the Temple Mount will be open to allow Jews to visit during the Rosh Hashana holiday itself, during regular visiting hours.

Israeli Knesset members and government ministers are not allowed to ascend to the Temple Mount at any time whatsoever, under a directive of the prime minister.

Hana Levi Julian

‘Jerusalem 1000-1400: Every People Under Heaven’ at the Met [video]

Monday, September 26th, 2016

Between the year 1000 and 1400, roughly the time of the crusades (1095-1291), the city of Jerusalem became the most significant place in the known world, an object of desire to people from as faraway as Britain and even Scandinavia and Iceland to India. This universal preoccupation with Jerusalem, ushered a most creative period in the city’s history, the subject of a new exhibition opening Tuesday, Sept. 26, at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The exhibition, “Jerusalem 1000–1400: Every People Under Heaven” demonstrates the enormous influence of the city, sacred to the three monotheistic religions, on the art of that time.

“While Jerusalem is often described as a city of three faiths, that formulation underestimates its fascinating complexity,” says the exhibition’s web page. “In fact, the city was home to multiple cultures, faiths, and languages. History records harmonious and dissonant voices of people from many lands, passing in the narrow streets of a city not much larger than midtown Manhattan. This will be the first exhibition to unravel the various cultural traditions and aesthetic strands that enriched and enlivened the medieval city.”

More than 200 works of art have been gathered from some 60 lenders worldwide, with a quarter of the objects arriving from Jerusalem, including key loans from the city’s religious communities, some of which have never before shared their treasures outside their walls. “Jerusalem 1000–1400: Every People Under Heaven” bears witness to the crucial role that the city has played in shaping world culture, a lesson vital to our common history.

The following are notes from the museum’s website, accompanying the exhibition.

“Beginning in about the year 1000, Jerusalem captivated the world’s attention as never before. Why did it hold that focus for the next four centuries?

“A kind of Jerusalem fever gripped much of the world from about 1000 to 1400. Across three continents, thousands made their way to the Holy City—from Jewish, Christian, and Islamic traditions alike. Generals and their armies fought over it. Merchants profited from it. Patrons, artists, pilgrims, poets, and scholars drew inspiration from it. Focusing their attention on this singular spot, they praised its magic, endowed its sacred buildings, and created luxury goods for residents and visitors. As a result, the Holy City shaped the art of this period in significant ways.

“Dramatic circumstances, including natural disasters, political turmoil, intense religious fervor, and an uptick in world travel, brought new attention to the city. In the 1030s, the Fatimid caliph who ruled over Jerusalem forged an agreement with the Byzantine emperor to rebuild the Holy City after a series of earthquakes and the malfeasance of his predecessor. In 1099 European Christians achieved their improbable dream of conquering Jerusalem. In the wake of their bloody victory, they created glorious buildings and works of art for nearly a century. In 1187, the military leader Saladin (1137/38–1193) retook the city and rededicated its Islamic sanctuaries. In the late 1200s through the 1300s, Mamluk sultans blessed with stable reigns promoted the city as a spiritual and scholarly center.

“Throughout these years, the city was home to more cultures, faiths, and languages than ever before. As the site of both conflict and coexistence, it inspired art of great beauty and fascinating complexity.”

One of the exhibition’s many galleries is named “The Absent Temple.” It cites instructions from an early 11th century guidebook for Jewish pilgrims regarding a visit to the Temple Mount: “If you are worthy to go up to Jerusalem you should observe the following procedure: If you are riding on a donkey, step down; if you are on foot, take off your sandals, then rending your garment say: ‘This our sanctuary was destroyed.'”

But even with no Temple to visit, Jewish pilgrims flocked to medieval Jerusalem. They came to mourn the destruction of the Temple and pray that it would one day be rebuilt. Their prayers largely took place not within the city but around its walls. They made a circuit of the city’s gates—a custom that was revived after the liberation of Old Jerusalem in 1967—concluding at the eastern Gates of Mercy, built over an ancient gateway to the Temple. There they might scratch their names and prayers into the stone. They then ascended the Mount of Olives, the historic site where it is believed that the Divine Spirit will return at the time of Redemption. This significant spot east of the city afforded the best vantage point from which to gaze upon the Temple platform.

The installation features specially commissioned videos that provide subtle glimpses, as through windows, of the varied and colorful panorama of Jerusalem with its ever-present medieval monuments. Complementing the videos are short interviews with some of the fascinating men and women who maintain the city’s medieval legacy.

On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 899, September 26, 2016–January 8, 2017


Arab Preacher gets 8 Months for Inspiring Assassination Attempt on MK Glick [video]

Sunday, September 25th, 2016

The Jerusalem Magistrate Court on Sunday morning sentenced Sheikh Omar Abu Sara to eight months in prison for inciting to murdering Jews in sermons he gave on the Temple Mount. The complaint against Abu Sara was submitted two years ago by legal aid society Honenu attorney Hur Nizri, in the name of Yehuda Glick, now a Likud MK, shortly after an assassination attempt on Glick.

Honenu issued a statement expressing pleasure for the fact that Abu Sara was finally placed behind bars, but was critical of the short sentence. “This is a case of too little too late,” said the statement, adding, “We wonder why he received such a relatively light sentence despite the fact that his incitements have many followers and could have caused attacks against Jews — while a Jewish young man with hardly any influence, who was convicted of possessing a document that was never disseminated, was given two years in prison.”

Back in March, the Rehovot Mgaistrate Court sentenced Moshe Orbach, 24, a rightwing activist from B’nei B’rak, to two years in prison plus half a year probation, for writing a document titled “Wicked Kingdom,” intended for limited dissemination. The document was discovered during the investigation of the torching of a section of the Fish and Loaves church near the Kinneret. Judge Menahem Mizrahi wrote in his sentence that “the harsh character of the document, all of which is comprised of incitement to violence in its environment, has a destructive potential should it reach attentive ears and willing hearts seeking violence.” The judge added that the exceptionally harsh sentence should serve as a warning to anyone else wishing to follow in Orbach’s footsteps that the courts “will not belittle acts that have the power to damage or subvert the delicate fabric of Israel’s population.”

All of which appears to be targeted mostly at Jews, because an Arab preacher who actually advocated murdering the entire Jewish segment of said delicate fabric of the population received less than half of Orbach’s sentence — and he, the Arab, didn’t just scribble it on a mimeographed booklet, he proudly declared it on YouTube:

“The Jews are the most wicked among Allah’s creatures. They are the worst villains who have ever walked the planet. We’re living in a time when the war against the Jews is near, and I say clearly to the Jews: It’s time to slaughter you. It’s time to fight you. It’s time to kill you. God willing, we are ready. We and the loyal Muslims, along with the armies of the Muslim Caliphate who will come to liberate this land from your filth. We are anticipating the day — the moment — of your slaughter.”

Spoken like a true man of God.


Netanyahu Holds Security Meeting Ahead of High Holidays

Monday, September 19th, 2016

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Sunday held a meeting to assess the security situation ahead of the Tishrei holidays—Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and Sukkot. Netanyahu called for in creased police presence, especially in the Old City and around the Temple Mount, directing “determined action” against any attempt to violate the public order there. In the case of Jews on the Temple Mount, these actions are normally determined by the Waqf agents, who are empowered to assess the level of spiritual engagement exerted by any Jew on the Temple Mount, and to decide whether said Jews have crossed the line and got dangerously close to their Father in Heaven.

Prime Minister Netanyahu ordered Knesset Speaker MK Yuli Edelstein to continue to prevent MKs and cabinet ministers from going up to the Temple Mount during this sensitive period, such sensitive period being defined as “always.”

The Prime Minister also directed that activity be increased against PA Arab incitement on social networks, including Facebook, with the goal of removing inflammatory content. He also instructed that a response team be established to refute disinformation about Israeli policy on the Temple Mount, such as the Jews are plotting to destroy the Al Aqsa mosque.

Netanyahu received an update on IDF operations and the reinforcement of units along the roads and inside Judea and Samaria communities.

Also participating in the meeting were Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan, Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat, Israel Policy Deputy Inspector General Zohar Dvir, Jerusalem District Police Commander Yoram Halevy, the deputy Director of the ISA, an IDF representative and personnel from the National Security Council.

David Israel

Netanyahu Orders Increased Police at Temple Mount, Reinforces Ban on Lawmakers Ahead of Jewish Holy Days

Sunday, September 18th, 2016

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu held a security assessment in Jerusalem prior to leaving for New York to attend the United Nations General Assembly, and ahead of the Jewish holy days in the Hebrew month of Tishrei.

Attending the meeting were Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan, Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat, Israel Policy Deputy Inspector General Zohar Dvir, Jerusalem District Police Commander Yoram Halevy, the deputy Director of the Israel Security Agency (Shin Bet domestic intelligence agency), an IDF representative and personnel from the National Security Council.

The prime minister ordered police to increase forces particularly in the Old City of Jerusalem and around the Temple Mount, underscoring that “determined action be taken against any attempt to violate order there,” according to his media adviser.

Netanyahu also requested that Knesset Speaker Yuli Edelstein take action to “continue to prevent parliamentarians and ministers from going up to the Temple Mount during this sensitive period,” his spokesperson said in a statement.

In addition, the prime minister “directed that activity be increased against Palestinian incitement on social networks, including expanded action vis-à-vis Facebook and other platforms, with the goal of removing inflammatory content. He also instructed that a response team be established to refute disinformation about Israeli policy on the Temple Mount.”

In addition, Netanyahu received an update on IDF operations and reinforcements along the roads and in the Jewish communities of Judea and Samaria.

Barely a few hours prior to the meeting, a terrorist from the Palestinian Authority stabbed and seriously wounded an IDF reservist at a guard post in the Judean city of Efrat, only eight minutes south of Jerusalem. The terrorist had infiltrated the community late Saturday night, and dozens of IDF soldiers, reservists and local security response personnel had spent the entire night searching the city and surrounding fields to track him down.

The attack came on the heels of a series of terrorist stabbings of IDF soldiers and other attacks against Israelis in Judea and Samaria, at least three of which took place in Hebron. In response, the IDF beefed up its forces in the holy city next to Kiryat Arba, but other Jewish communities are still vulnerable.

On Friday afternoon barely an hour before the start of the Sabbath, an Arab couple from the nearby town of Bani Naim carried out a vehicle ramming attack at the Elias Junction entrance to Kiryat Arba on Highway 60, next to the Paz gas station, at the bus stop and hitchhiking post. IDF soldiers stationed at the site shot and killed the male terrorist and wounded the female attacker; but three Israeli teenagers were injured and suffered major trauma as well. All three were treated for their relatively minor physical wounds and the major shock they endured.

Within hours, the IDF surrounded and sealed off Bani Naim, which also was home to the teenage terrorist who climbed in the window of the Kiryat Arba home of 13-year-old Hallel Ariel, z’l, at the start of this summer and stabbed her to death while she slept in her bed.

It’s not known how long the closure will last. But Arab villages have been sealed off before, and when the curfew is lifted, terrorists are free to leave and kill Israelis again, inspired and financially remunerated for their efforts by the government of the Palestinian Authority.

The prime minister is clearly hoping that beefed up police at the Temple Mount and in the Old City will contain, if not entirely eliminate Arab terror attacks while he is meeting with President Barack Obama in New York, and addressing the United Nations General Assembly: a gathering that for the most part could care less these days whether Israelis live or die.

It’s Netanyahu’s unenviable job to remind them of why they should care, if only for their own survival — and Israel’s — and the last thing he wants or needs is trouble at home by Knesset members who take the opportunity while he is away to create “a distraction.”

Hana Levi Julian

Walter Bingham File – A Discovery That Shook The Academic World & The Inner Secrets Of Chabad Lubavitch [audio]

Sunday, September 18th, 2016

Weekly archaeological finds are incontrovertible evidence of the Jewish connection to this land. Now it’s in the footsteps of King David to the fortified city of Sha’arayim, in the Valley of Elah where David fought Goliath, as described in the book of Samuel. The Bible Lands Museum in Jerusalem has mounted an outstanding exhibition of artifacts from that location that shook the academic world. See it with Walter who paints pictures in sound.

How: The Arabs try to destroy all evidence of the Jewish connection with Temple Mount, by illegally digging there and tipping everything into Arab Landfills.

Plus: The real Chabad Lubavitch. An insight into their philosophy and achievements. Walter talks with the Chairman and Managing Director of this extraordinary Chasidic movement Rabbi Yehuda Krinsky.

The Walter Bingham File 18Sept.2016 – PODCAST

Israel News Talk Radio

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/multimedia/israel-news-talk-radio/walter-bingham-file/walter-bingham-file-a-discovery-that-shook-the-academic-world-the-inner-secrets-of-chabad-lubavitch-audio/2016/09/18/

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