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May 5, 2016 / 27 Nisan, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Temple Mount’

Israel Inspired: Why Did Israel Arrest an IDF Soldier Who Killed a Terrorist? [audio]

Thursday, March 31st, 2016

On his Temple Mount visit, Ari encountered the ugly hypocrisy of Islamic oppression as he was swarmed by unrestrained Muslims shouting “Allah Akbar” as he was reprimanded for whispering to G-d under his breath. Ari & Jeremy then discuss Israel’s approach to fighting Jihad and the controversial story of how Israel is handling the IDF soldier who neutralized a terrorist in Hebron.

The Land of Israel

Jordan: Temple Mount Cameras Will Only Track Israelis

Saturday, March 19th, 2016

Jordan’s Minister of State for Information Mohamed al-Mumani said that the cameras to be installed on the Temple Mount will be to “document Israeli trespasses” according to reporter Khaled Abu Toameh.

Those “trespasses” primarily refer to Jews praying on the Temple Mount, the Jewish people’s holiest site.

Islamists are afraid of Jewish prayers on the Temple Mount, as Jews praying there contradicts the Islamic belief in the supremacy of Islam and its replacement theology.

The Jordanian minister notes that the cameras will not be installed inside the mosque, which the Islamists have used to store weapons to attack Israeli police and others on the Temple Mount.

A number of Islamic clerics have expressed opposition to the installation of the cameras, as they are afraid Israel will use them to identify Arab rioters and terrorists on the Temple Mount.

The plan to install the cameras began in October 2015, following Arab attacks and riots on the Temple Mount against Jews, police and tourists.

Israel allows Jordan to play a significant role on the Temple Mount, which many Jews believe is a mistake.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Watch Israeli Police Forbid Jews to Drink Water on the Temple Mount [video]

Sunday, March 6th, 2016

A group of Jews went up to the Temple Mount today. During their visit they wanted to stop and drink some water.

To their surprise, Officer Shlomi wouldn’t let them drink.

Watch for yourself.

Outrageous!

Draw whatever conclusions you want.

Source

Video of the Day

An American Rabbi’s ‘Experience’ at The Temple Mount

Thursday, March 3rd, 2016

Following is the experience of an American rabbi who went with his wife to visit the Temple Mount in Jerusalem this week, thinking it would be the exciting Zionist experience it once was decades ago.

It was indeed “exciting” but not quite in the way he expected.

“My wife and I almost earned a spot in the news today. Or at least on a police blotter. And I was mostly innocent.

“Since the 1960s when my family and I freely and unafraid explored all of the Muslim holy sites on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, I have wanted to revisit it,” he told JewishPress.com in an exclusive interview. With the recent excitement about who controls the area, my wife and I decided that this time we would have to include it.

“We arrived on time for visiting hours at the end of a long queue of people anxious to climb the long ramp from the plaza level of the Kotel to the Temple Mount. We saw people from every nook and cranny of the world and enjoyed listening to all of their languages as we waited for the gate at the front to open. Naturally, security is very tight,” he acknowledged.

“After roughly 100 others had filed through we brought up the rear. My wife placed her purse on the table and walked through the metal detector to the other side without arousing as much as a blink from the police. I emptied my pockets, set my cell phone and pen on the table and the guards motioned for me to remove my hat.”

That’s when the “excitement” began.

“A gasp and hurried instructions to one another were immediate, and they demanded our passports. There, to the apparent shock of every guard, perched on my head was a kippah. The chief of the micro police force receded into a small office, emerging about five minutes later still holding the passports and glaring at me. Obviously I was a troublemaker.”

The police chief was clearly irritable, according to the rabbi, who said he was told to “calm down” when he asked him whether they should leave or whether his wife could go up on her own.

“Do you want to go to jail?” the burly police chief reportedly rasped. About 20 minutes later, after a few more office retreats and whispered conversations with the other guards, the officer strode over to the rabbi.

“Where is your Kippah?” he demanded to know. By then the rabbi had removed it; he showed him that he had placed it in a carry bag. “I was willing to suffice with the hat to avoid looking Jewish; I shared with him my business card identifying me as a rabbi, to further assure him that I was aware of the delicate situation and would act responsibly.”

That was clearly a mistake: the police chief now appeared to be convinced the rabbi was intending to do “something religious” up on the Temple Mount, the rabbi said. “He retreated once again into his office, ostensibly to check with “the office” to determine if I was previously known to the police as an agitator.

“With only a few minutes left in the one hour allotment, he finally reemerged, handed back my business card, and told me to put on my kippah. ‘Come, go up,’ he groused at me. My wife and I began the trek up the ramp, a bit surprised but glad nevertheless. A young haredi-religious guard – kippah, tzitzit, long peyyot and unarmed – joined us. Halfway up we were greeted and flanked by two heavily armed policemen.

“At the top of the ramp, as we approached the holy ground, several more police surrounded us in a very tight circle. In this formation we begin a slow march onto the grounds.

Hana Levi Julian

Court Rules Against Boy Who Sang Israel’s National Anthem on Temple Mount

Tuesday, February 9th, 2016

Avraham Fuah, who spent last night in jail, told the court at his hearing today that he doesn’t understand why he was arrested for on the Temple Mount yesterday for singing HaTikva, Israel’s national anthem – as he broke no laws in doing so, according to a TPS report.

Fuah also described to the court how the police acted violently towards him.

The State Prosecutor actually claimed that Fuah had bowed down on the floor [in prayer] during his arrest, Fuah pointed out that the policeman threw him down to the ground while arresting him, and he was injured as a result.

In the video you can see one policeman grab Fuah by the chin and face as he sings HaTikva, turning him around and physically silencing him by covering his mouth.

Judge David Shaul Gabai Richter ruled that by singing Israel’s national anthem in front of Israeli police on the Temple Mount, Fuah endangered the public’s safety.

The judge decided, according to the Hakol Hayehudi website, that there was reasonable suspicion that Fuah sang Israel’s national anthem as an “act of demonstration”.

The judge concluded, “It goes without saying that the state symbols, including the national anthem, are protected by law and the company’s core values. Freedom of expression is also a fundamental right in society, but this freedom can be withdrawn when there is a real concern and probability that a certain expression will cause a disturbance.”

The judge ruled that Fuah is banned from visiting the Temple Mount for the next 15 days.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Boy Arrested for Singing “HaTikva” on Temple Mount

Monday, February 8th, 2016

While Arab MKs and Arab Supreme Court Justices absolutely refuse to sing the HaTikva, Israel’s national anthem, a young Jewish boy was arrested today for daring to sing it on the Temple Mount during his visit to the Jewish Holy site, according to a TPS report.

He’ll will have a court hearing on Tuesday in Jerusalem, and is being represented by a lawyer for Honenu.

Will the boy dare sing HaTikva in the courtroom?

Read more.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Jordan Adds to Western Wall Mixed-Gender Prayer Controversy

Sunday, February 7th, 2016

Jordan is demanding that Israel “return jurisdiction” over part of the Western Wall to the Islamic Waqf controlled by Amman.

The demand followed the decision by the Israeli government last week to set aside the southernmost section of the Wall, known as Robinson’s Arch, as a place for mixed-gender prayer. Jordan refers to the same place as the “Umayyad Palaces.”

Jordan contends that the decision violates the jurisdiction of the Waqf Islamic Authority over Jerusalem’s holy places, an agreement made between the two countries in 1967.

On Saturday, Jordanian Minister of Communications and Media Affairs Muhammad Momani “urged Israel not to meddle with the Umayyad Palaces area and to ensure its return under the jurisdiction of the Jordanian Jerusalem Waqf Department, which is the entity responsible for administering and safeguarding the site,” the Jordan news agency Petra reported in the Jordan Times.

“Israeli occupation forces have recently settled internal differences among followers of different Jewish sects at the expense of the area of the Umayyad Palaces,” Petra said.

“Israeli occupation forces had decided to expand a platform to allow more Jewish worshippers into the area. The violation against the Umayyad Palaces is the latest in a long series of assaults and violations against the site. Occupation forces have carried out several excavation works there, destroying Arab and Islamic heritage,” Petra added on behalf of Jordan’s government.

Israel’s government approved plans last week to expand the Western Wall plaza in order to accommodate the increasing demands for non-Orthodox prayer at the site. A small wooden platform at Robinson’s Arch has already been set up for mixed-gender prayer.

Jordan’s lamentation over Israeli “occupation” is a bit spurious, given the Hashemite tenure itself as custodian over parts of Jerusalem, Judea and Samaria lasted only from 1948 to 1967 – a total of 31 years.

Jerusalem has long since been reunited and whole for a period much longer than that: June 2017 will mark half a century since the restoration of the Temple Mount, the Western Wall and elsewhere in Jerusalem and the Land to the Jewish State of Israel.

However, to be fair, the dismay of the Hashemite Kingdom over the compromise over non-Orthodox prayer allowed by the government is also reflected among some Muslims in Israel and ironically is shared with some observant Jews locally and globally as well.

Mixed-gender prayer has never been allowed at the Western Wall – in fact, historically it was not allowed in either Holy Temple. In Torah law, women are not counted among a minyan (quorum) of men.

Not that this grants validity to the Jordanian claim of authority and hopes to win Waqf control of the site, which is more of a simple attempt at another political territory grab.

The Umayyad Palaces were two buildings which archaeologists say were built by the Umayyads who ruled for a period of 100 years in the late seventh century. They were destroyed in an earthquake and lay buried until they were unearthed by Israeli archaeologists in a 1970s excavation, creating a public history park to educate all.

The Western Wall is part of Judaism’s most sacred site on the planet, the Temple Mount, located alongside. The site is also the third holiest in Islam. The Wall is part of the outer retaining wall of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem, its sole material remnant that has survived throughout the centuries. In Islam, it is believed that the prophet Mohammed rose up to Heaven on his mighty steed el-Buraq from a site near the Western Wall.

In Judaism, it is believed that somewhere on the grounds of the Temple Mount lies the site of the “Holy of Holies” of the two Holy Temples of Jerusalem – the inner sanctum where the High Priest (Kohen Gadol) communed with G-d Himself during sacrifices and services. No one other than the Kohen Gadol was ever allowed to enter this place, and to this day countless rabbis forbid Jews to tread upon the Temple Mount grounds for fear of erroneously entering this area.

The Israeli government does not allow Jews to pray within the Temple Mount in accordance with a status quo agreement with the Jordanian Waqf. Within the Temple Mount grounds are built the Al Aqsa Mosque and the Dome of the Rock, where Muslims are allowed to pray.

Hana Levi Julian

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/jordan-adds-to-western-wall-mixed-gender-prayer-controversy/2016/02/07/

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