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October 26, 2014 / 2 Heshvan, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Texas’

Carnival Cruise Passenger In On-Board Ebola Quarantine

Sunday, October 19th, 2014

A Texas lab technician is in voluntary quarantine aboard a Carnival Cruise ship after the CDC issued a travel ban on workers from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas who were near where Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan died.

The technician on the cruise ship handled fluids from the dead Ebola patient.

The new CDC requirements are that suspected carriers are banned from planes, trains, ships, bars, restaurants, stores, theaters, and other public locations for a period of 21 days from their last contact.

The technician will be at day 21 on Sunday, and she is currently quarantined in the room with her husband and is showing no symptoms of the disease.

The cruise ship, with 4000 passengers, was set to dock in Mexico, but the country refused to let the ship dock.

The ship was able to let the passengers, except the possibly infected passenger, disembark in Belize and is returning to Texas, where it will arrive on Sunday.

In addition, Dallas nurse, Nina Pham (26) has been diagnosed with Ebola, and is in fair condition and being treated.

While another Dallas nurse, Amber Vinson (29), who was infected with Ebola, flew on a plane between Dallas and Cleveland. She is hospitalized in stable condition. She was flying out to plan her upcoming wedding.

Both nurses treated Thomas Eric Duncan at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital.

Ebola Victim Dies in Texas; Israel Gears Up to Meet Threat

Friday, October 10th, 2014

The first person on American soil diagnosed with the lethal Ebola virus, 42-year-old Thomas Eric Duncan, died Wednesday just before the Jewish Sukkot holiday, according to NBC News.

Duncan, a Liberian national who was diagnosed just days after arriving in Texas from Liberia, succumbed after nearly two weeks of battling the virus in an isolation room in a Dallas hospital. He had been treated with the experimental medication brincidofovir. The same medication is now being used to treat American journalist Ashoka Mukpo, who was airlifted from Liberia to a hospital to Nebraska on Monday.

Since the outbreak began in West Africa in March, more than 3,400 people have died from the Ebola virus out of nearly 7,500 confirmed, probable and suspected cases.

The U.S. has announced plans to begin screening air passengers arriving from affected countries sometime this weekend.

In Israel, meanwhile, health care officials are gearing up to deal with the strong possibility that Ebola may arrive in the Jewish State.

Israel is noting the progression of the disease across the continents as it moves closer to the Middle East.

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu gathered top ministers in his Jerusalem office just prior to the start of the Jewish holiday of Sukkot to review Israel’s readiness for the Ebola virus.

Health Minister Yael German, Transportation and Road Safety Minister Yisrael Katz, Deputy Interior Minister Fania Kirsenbaum, and representatives from Israel Police, the Airports Authority and the Foreign Ministry participated in the discussion.

Officials from the health ministry presented information on the current global situation regarding the spread and transmission of the virus.

The greatest concern about the spread of the disease was focused on Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, according to the communique from the prime minister’s office. Government officials resolved to identify people entering the country from those nations, where the virus is the most prevalent. The foreign and health ministries are both advising Israelis to avoid travel to those areas as well.

Three mobile clinics have been dispatched by Israel to affected areas in western Africa to help combat the illness, the committee said.

Also this week, a Spanish nurse who became the first person to contract the virus outside of West Africa was admitted to hospital, according to a report by the BBC. Teresa Romero was part of a team of 30 staff caring for two missionaries who later died from the virus after returning from West Africa. Romero told the El Pais newspaper she believed she may have contracted the disease while removing her protective suit after cleaning one of the missionaries’ rooms.

Two doctors who treated her have also been admitted to the hospital for observation; so far, neither has shown any symptoms of Ebola, a spokesperson for the Carlos III Medical Center confirmed.

Romero’s brother was quoted as saying her health has worsened and she is now being helped with her breathing.

A Spanish court order to euthanize the nurse’s dog was issued Tuesday even though it was not clear whether the animal was infected or even bore any risk of carrying the disease. Protesters quickly gathered outside Romero’s home after animal rights groups were alerted by her husband, who is also being kept in isolation in a hospital as a precaution; they tried to stop the government van that came to remove the dog from her home.

In other parts of the world, Australia has also reported its first case of the disease this week, and a Turkish worker has been hospitalized with a suspected case in Istanbul as well.

Health officials in Germany have confirmed a third Ebola patient who arrived in the country after having contracted the illness in Liberia.

Ebola’s First American-Based Victim in Critical Condition, Plus Ebola Scare at Newark

Saturday, October 4th, 2014

The first American victim of Ebola is listed in serious critical condition in a Dallas Hospital, but officials are trying to calm down citizens who are running scared irrationally.

They explained that while Ebola is highly dangerous, it can be spread only through direct contact with the bodily fluids of an infected person.

Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital officials said the medical condition of the first diagnosed victim in the United States, Thomas Duncan, is deteriorating. Four other people living in the same residence with Duncan have been removed and examined, and they show no signs of the deadly disease.

Health officials are monitoring another 40 people who have been in contact with Duncan.

Duncan apparently brought the disease with him from Ebola-infected Liberia, where he visited. Hospital officials mis-diagnosed Duncan’s condition two weeks ago and released him until he was re-admitted three days later.

Ebola has spread fear throughout the country, and the Centers for Disease Control reported that in the last four days, 100 people in 33 states were investigated for the disease, which was not found in any of the cases.

One inmate in Georgia showed symptoms of Ebola, but tests were negative. However, he was put in isolation because he recently was in West Africa.

In Newark, New Jersey, a man and his daughter were hauled off a flight because of fears they were infected. THE CDC entered the plane is hazmat suits, and escorted the pair to the hospital. The CBC later determined they had not been infected.

NBC journalist Ashoka Mukpo, whose biological father is Jewish and who works in Liberia has been diagnosed with Ebola and is being treated there but was expected to return to the United States by Sunday.

Dear Sean: A Tribute to Sgt. Sean Carmeli, ZT”L

Wednesday, August 20th, 2014

Dear Sean,

We never met. When the news of your death was spread through the media on Sunday, July 20, with the added detail that you grew up in South Padre Island, Texas, my son called from summer camp to ask if I knew you.

No, I said, I did not.

But in a deeper way, I sense that I do know you. You grew up on South Padre Island, a town known for its beautiful beaches, vacation homes and Spring break revelry. You grew up a proud Jew, one of only 75 in a town of 2800 people. Being part of a small community didn’t weaken your Jewish identity; it reinforced it. The culture around you may have been light and carefree; you were focused and determined. To you, purpose and people-hood were the foundation of identity. The free-spirted lifestyle didn’t hold your interest; the needs of your people did.

It began with your parents, Alon and Dalya, who came to South Padre Island 20 years ago to pursue financial opportunity. They did well. But finances, to them, were the means not the end. Within a few years, they were part of a nascent Jewish community, searching for tradition, forging a spiritual connection. They were leaders in the group that constructed a synagogue, hired a rabbi, and built a Jewish future on land without much Jewish past. It was your parents who purchased the community’s first Torah scroll and who dedicated the synagogue in memory of your grandfather and namesake. It is clear you absorbed their passion. You developed a strong connection to South Padre’s Rabbi Yonatan and as well as to Rio Grande Chabad shliach, Rabbi Asher Hecht.

Others your age, with your talents, affable personality, mature nature, and ability to get things done, would have channeled that drive to commercial aspirations. That would have been valid, but you decided to go beyond the natural, to do something connected to the essence of who you are, to your Jewishness. You decided to spend your last high school years in Israel and join the Israeli army.

You understood this is a difficult time for our people. You appreciated that the battle of our time is no less significant and foundational than WWII; an epic battle of civilizations. On the one hand stands the Judeo credo of cherishing life, respecting the individual, and worshiping God in a peaceful manner. On the other stands an ideology whose worship celebrates death, who can make no room for other, who is empowered by terrorizing civilians of neighboring states, and who freely puts their own civilians in harms’ way in order to paint themselves as helpless victims, exploiting the sensitivities of Western civilization.

What would be a stark distinction is made blurry by a secular media obsessed with “proportionality” in body count, whose sense of justice requires that both sides suffer equally, who are experts at assessing not the morality of the conflict but the sameness of the destruction. It is an amoral approach that, had it been prevalent during WWII, would have resulted in the loss of the Allies to the Axis. (“So what if the Germans bombed London; most of the English were protected in the Underground. The Allies shouldn’t bomb munition factories near Berlin as some of our bombs might accidentally hit nearby civilians.”) As our sages taught long ago, “One who becomes compassionate to the cruel, will ultimately become cruel to the compassionate.”

Dear Sean, you were acutely aware that the battle of the day is as much to protect Israelis as to combat those seeking to delegitimize Israel. What makes it so difficult is that we stand on linguistic putty, in which language means one thing to the enemy and another to those they are convincing. “Free Palestine” resonates to the Western ear; it sounds fair enough. But when shouted by our antagonists it means “from the Jordan to the Sea,” the very destruction of Israel. “End the Blockade” sounds reasonable enough. But the reality of its impact would be allowing Hamas to bring in guided rockets from Iran against which Iron Dome would be impotent.

Young Americans Turning Their Back on Israel

Monday, August 11th, 2014

America’s younger generation that was born long after the pro-Israel enthusiasm fallout from the Six-Day War is far less enthusiastic about Israel than the older “baby boomers” and even thinks that Israel’s war against terror in Gaza was unjustified.

Media have reported that a Gallup Poll last month showed support for Israel, but a breakdown of the survey reveals that those between ages 18 and 29 criticized Israel by a 2-1 margin, The Hill reported.

Alec Tyson, a senior researcher with Pew, told The Hill that while the findings were “significant,” it was also important not to draw too sweeping a generalization from them. “He noted that when Americans were asked whether they had more overall sympathy for Israel or the Palestinians, Israel consistently comes out on top,” The Hill wrote..

But there is a drastic change in the numbers.

Tyson explained, “Young people are more sympathetic to Israel than the Palestinians by about two-to-one, rather than by about six-to-one among the oldest Americans.”

As recently as 2006, during the Second Lebanese War against Hezbollah, Americans in 18-29 bracket blamed Hezbollah more than Israel by a lopsided 3-1 margin, according to Pew poll cited by The Washington Post.

A Pew survey last month revealed that while Americans blamed Hamas for the violence in the war by a 40-19 percent margin, a plurality of those aged 18-29 blamed Israel.

“Israel has taken a PR battering in the current war,” Tevi Troy, who served as a liaison to the Jewish community for the administration of President George W. Bush, told The Hill. “There is a lot of anti-Israel propaganda.”

The report suggested that part of the change in opinion might be related to the phenomena of social media that has made information more immediate but also more opinionated, on all parts of the political spectrum.

Gory pictures of dead Arabs plastered all over the web during the war, even if some of the bodies were “borrowed” from Syria, Iran and previous wars against Israel, have had a far more powerful impact that photos of roofs of homes in Sderot damaged by rockets or even children taking cover from  an incoming missile attack.

The Hill also noted that older American remember the Yom Kippur and Six-Day wars, in which Israel was not branded as evil by the media outside of the Arab world.

The younger generation only knows Israel as a super-power and is easily pulled into the bleeding heart camp for Arabs who are promoted by UNRWA as “refugees” even though their permanent homeless status is a result of the United Nations’ singling them out as fourth and fifth-generation Arabs as refugees, a classification that is not made for anyone else in the world.

“Still, pro-Israel figures insisted that the shift among the young was nothing to panic about — yet,” The Hill concluded, along with the assumption – and it is just an assumption – by Troy that  “over the long run, America’s interests and Israel’s interests are aligned.”

Dallas Rabbi Sued for Running Home-Based Synagogue

Thursday, February 6th, 2014

A Dallas-area rabbi who uses his home as a synagogue is being sued by a neighbor who says it has lowered his property values.

Rabbi Yaakov Rich told the local Fox affiliate Fox4 in a video posted Wednesday that his 3,700-square-foot home is a synagogue with about 25 members. A website identifies his synagogue as Congregation Toras Chaim, with the tag line, “An intimate space … Grow at your pace.”

The website also announces that the Liberty Institute, a conservative Christian advocacy and legal defense organization, has agreed to represent the congregation in the current lawsuit.

“We just want to have our religious freedom to be able to pray and to study in this house,” Rich told Fox.

David Schneider, who lives across the street from the home-based synagogue, is seeking $50,000 in compensatory damages from Rich, saying that the synagogue has caused a decline in the value of his home.

Rich asserts that property values rise around Orthodox synagogues because adherents have to be able to walk to their places of worship and will pay more to buy a home in the area.

Rich recently filed with the city for a certificate stating that he runs a congregation in the home at the request of the city, which can then ask him to adhere to city and state building codes.

Presidential Bid coming? Rick Perry Says He’ll Visit Israel

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

Texas Republican Gov. Rick Perry, in what observers see as a move signaling a possible White House run, said he is planning to visit Israel in October.

Perry, who has announced that he will not run for a fourth term as Texas governor, told the Washington Times in an interview last Friday, “We will be going to Israel to bring together Arabs, Christian and Jews in an educational forum.”

Political analysts believe the trip to the Jewish state shows that Perry is considering a campaign for the 2016 presidential election. He dropped his bid for the 2012 Republican nomination during the primaries.

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) — reported to be potential presidential candidates for 2016 — have made trips to Israel this year.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/presidential-bid-coming-rick-perry-says-hell-visit-israel/2013/07/16/

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