web analytics
April 18, 2014 / 18 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Tiberias’

Precipitation in Jerusalem 50% of Annual Amount

Sunday, December 15th, 2013

Torrential rains and the “snowstorm of the century” last week have left Jerusalem with 51 percent of its annual amount of precipitation, according to observations by the Israeli Meteorological Service, and the winter has barely begun.

Be’er Sheva, where many areas still are flooded, now has accumulated 63 percent of is annual rainfall and more than double the amount for this time of year.

Rainfall so this year in metropolitan Tel Aviv is 44-50 percent of its annual average, and Tiberias, which borders the Kinneret (Sea of Galilee), has received 131 percent of the usual rainfall for this time of year and one-third of its annual average.

Most of Israel’s precipitation usually falls from late December to early March. No more rain is in sight until early next week.

Charity on the Kinneret: Tiberias Soup Kitchen Serves Hot Food Seasoned with Kindness

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

Mrs. Lee Steinberg and Meir Panim are celebrating the 12th anniversary of the Free Restaurant in Tiberias, Israel. This restaurant-style soup kitchen has been lauded for its delicious, nutritious meals served in a dignified manner in an inviting atmosphere. One hundred and sixty meals are served daily and sixty Meals-on-Wheels are packaged and delivered to the homebound. Located in the city center, the Tiberias Free Restaurant serves people who come each and every day to get a nutritious, and for many, their only hot meal of the day.

Mrs. Lee Steinberg of New York has funded the Meir Panim Free Restaurant in Tiberias since its inception 12 years ago.

Mrs. Lee Steinberg of New York has funded the Meir Panim Free Restaurant in Tiberias since its inception 12 years ago.

In addition to fresh, hot daily meals, visitors to the Tiberias Free Restaurant may take home extra portions. Before holidays and Shabbat, the restaurant donates food and packaged meals to the needy.

According to Shmuel Levy, logistics manager for Meir Panim, the demographics of the visitors to the Meir Panim restaurant vary, from the elderly who barely survive on their pension funds to the working poor who struggle to feed their families.

Eighty-five-year-old Ruth called Meir Panim “something special.” Widowed, Ruth said she fell into a serious depression after her husband passed away four years ago. The restaurant not only provides her with a warm meal, but gives her the opportunity to socialize as well. “They take care of us and are kind,” she said. “This institution is doing a huge mitzvah in taking care of us – the people of Israel who have no family or work to sustain us.”

Mrs. Steinberg, who resides in Floral Park, NY, has funded this operation since its inception. While her philanthropy and interest is wide-spread, her connection with Meir Panim is particularly strong. She is also involved with the Israel Nutrition Center in Kiryat Gat, which will further extend the wide range of food and outreach programs of Meir Panim. She is looking forward to the opening of this revolutionary new facility.

Her father’s family (The Baum family of Fort Wayne, Indiana) was staunchly Zionist and recognized, early on, the urgent need for a Jewish homeland. They were instrumental in creating the first girls’ agricultural school in Israel.

“It has been most rewarding to be a part of American Friends of Meir Panim,” says Mrs. Steinberg. “I am watching Meir Panim grow into a nationwide network of centers providing every type of sustenance for those in need, regardless of background or ethnicity.”

Vacation Space Available in Kineret Hotels

Friday, October 25th, 2013

In wake of the series of small earthquakes that recently hit Tiberias, Kineret Hotels managers are reporting that many dozens of Tel Aviv residents have cancelled their vacations in Tiberias.

Roni Manor, the general manager of the Nof Ginnosar hotel told Makor Rishon that yesterday a group of 25 Tel Avivians called and cancelled their stay this weekend, because “they’re afraid of an earthquake”.

Manor told the group that they’re crazy, “They live in Tel Aviv, the main target of Iran’s nukes, and they’re afraid of some tremors!”

Manor said, the country’s scared, because the media is creating panic.

So we’ll take the other route at JewishPress.com, if you want to go away this weekend (and aren’t going to Hebron for Parshat Chayei Sarah), check it out, you might be able to get good rates right now at a Tiberias hotel.

 

Experts Warn: Major Earthquake Could Hit Israel Any Time

Wednesday, October 23rd, 2013

Last Sunday, Israel experienced two earthquakes, raising fears that a significant geological event could occur. Sunday’s quakes followed two others, one on Saturday morning and another on Thursday evening. Although they were all minor in scope, some experts warn that a major earthquake may hit the region in the near future, capable of inflicting fatalities and significant property damage.

Professor Amotz Agnon, a geology and geophysics expert working at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, explained that a strong earthquake in Israel could “lead to thousands of deaths. From experience, we know that everything depends on the time of day an earthquake occurs. The cities of Safed, Tiberias, Kiryat Shmona, Beit She’an and Eilat, unfortunately, are all built above the Syrian-African fault-line.”

Dr. Avi Shapiro, chairman of the government panel on earthquakes, also believes that such an earthquake is only a matter of time. According to Shapiro, consecutive small earthquakes similar to the recent geological activity in Israel may represent the prequel to one gigantic earthquake. Shapiro cautioned that this is not inevitable, however, since small earthquakes can also relieve pressure, thereby preventing larger earthquakes.

While more preparation is needed, Shapiro maintains that the government has prepared for major earthquakes. Structurally, many public buildings, including schools, and newer homes and apartment buildings can probably withstand a significant earthquake. On the other hand, older buildings in Israel require upgrades to comply with modern earthquake codes. Shapiro also recommended that Israelis educate themselves regarding proper earthquake procedures.

With regard to the imminence of a major earthquake, other experts disagree with Agnon and Shapiro. Dr. Uri Frieslander, general manager of the Israel Geophysical Institute, does not believe that the long-predicted major earthquake will strike any time in the near future. “We cannot say that this event will yield something in the future. We are watching carefully the results of the seismological map,” he said. “There were similar cases in the past in which a number of earthquakes clustered around the same time and place, among other cases in Lebanon and the Gilboa. The truth is we don’t know what this recent string means.”

Visit United with Israel.

Family Sues after Haredim Call them ‘Shiksas’

Sunday, September 1st, 2013

A family that purchased a vacation package in a hotel in Tiberias has sued the travel agency that sold them the deal because of false promises and for being humiliated by the Haredi guests at the same hotel.

In the February of 2012, the plaintiffs in a suit at the Jerusalem Magistrates Court purchased a 2-night package for the Passover vacation at the Metzuda hotel in Tiberias from a travel agency, Mynet reports. The package included 3 rooms for 8 people, full board, cost 7,500 shekel (about $2,100), paid in advance.

But, according to the lawsuit, what the family was offered in return for their money was less than satisfactory. The state of maintenance in the hotel, including the rooms and other facilities, was poor and neglected, starting with odors from the sewer system and ending with filthy rooms.

Also, despite the promises to the contrary made by the agency, just about all the other guests at the hotel were Haredim, with the family members found no basis for communication. In fact, according to the mother, “in the hotel they yelled ‘shiksa’ at my daughters, because they wore pants.”

The term ‘shiksa’ is an Ashkenazi pronunciation of the Hebrew word sheketz-vermin, in the female form. It used to be a putdown name for gentile women, but has been in wide use by Haredim looking to humiliate non-Haredi Jewish women in Israel, including non-Haredi religious women.

Attempts to contact the agency for a change of venue failed, and when they finally reached a real person, they were deaf to their complaints, goes the lawsuit. The family refused to remain at the hotel under those conditions and drove back home.

The agency explained in court that a representative who happened to be staying at the same hotel was on hand, and spoke to the plaintiffs several times. It also denied presenting Metzuda as a four-star hotel. It’s only a three-star hotel.

You can tell the difference, because in a four-star hotel you don’t smell the sewer system quite as much.

As to the Haredi guests – they can’t quite be made responsible for who else is vacationing at the same hotel.

But the agency CEO did not deny that the family was told the guests would be comprised of “members of all shades of the religious public.”

The judge was sympathetic to the plaintiffs, who were asking for a little over $11,000 in damages. But he accused them of not taking the initiative in verifying just what kind of hotel they were going to. The most cursory search online would have provided them with ample information and, possibly, helped them change their package while there was still time.

He also asked what kind of hotel were they expecting for what came down to $130 per person with full room and board?

On the other hand, in a country rife with so much sensitivity and strife between different streams and denominations within what is known as the “religious public,” it was the duty of the travel agency to go out of its way to make sure the match between their clients and the package was a good one. After all, that’s why we use travel agency and not pick a package off the Internet.

The final verdict was in favor of the plaintiffs, but with the agency being made to pay back only 5,200 shekel, plus attorney’s fees to the tune of 3,500 shekel, altogether about $2,400.

A spokesperson for the travel agency, Margaliot, told Mynet that they had offered the family to pay them back the entire $2,100, but they, apparently, saw an opportunity to get rich quick. Now both sides ended up losing, needlessly.

Get rich quick on $11 thousand? Seriously?

The Rich Jewish History of Tiberias

Wednesday, June 12th, 2013

Tiberias is one the four Holy cities in Israel and is known as the city of water; its Jewish history is rich and ancient, dating back to antiquity.

In biblical times, Tiberias was a Jewish burial city. For this reason, many Jews originally refused to live there, since to do so was considered ritually unclean. Then, Herod Antipas, son of Herod the Great, decided to build the city of Tiberias in honor of the Roman Emperor Tiberias right on top of the Jewish burial city. Most Jews, however, refused to inhabit the city, until political circumstances caused Jews to reconsider their decision.

After the conclusion of the Bar Kokhba Revolt (around 70 CE), Jewish life within Judea was virtually wiped out of existence, thus forcing the Jewish people to relocate to the Galilee region. As a result, Rabbi Shimon Bar Yochai purified Tiberias of its graves, so that Tiberias could serve as the main center of Jewish learning and culture within the Land of Israel. The Sanhedrin, whose rulings affected the entire Jewish Diaspora, met in Tiberias, and the Jerusalem Talmud was written there, despite the fact that the Jews of Tiberias faced intense Byzantine persecution.

Due to the intensity of Byzantine oppression, the Jews of Israel would support the Persians in their attempt to conquer Israel, in the hopes that the Jewish people would be able to re-establish their ancestral homeland under Persian dominion, like was done in the past. Yet unfortunately, the Byzantines managed to defeat the Persians. The Byzantines in turn were defeated by the Arabs. Under Arab rule, Tiberias would remain a center of Jewish learning, with the Nikud vowel notation in Hebrew being invented within Tiberias under Arab rule in the seventh century. Between 1391 and the fifteenth century, a significant number of Sephardic Jews made Aliyah to Israel, fleeing a wave of persecutions in Spain, thus reinforcing the Jewish connection to Israel. Many of these Sephardic Jews settled in Tiberias. In fact, when the Holy Land was under Ottoman rule, Dona Gracia Nasi, a Sephardic Jewish woman, arranged with Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent to have a Jewish province in Tiberias, which would serve as a safe haven for Jews fleeing the Spanish Inquisition. Some historians believe that this was an early effort to re-establish Jewish statehood. The community was somewhat successful for a period of time. Unfortunately, about one hundred years later, Tiberias was abandoned by the Jewish community due to fighting between the Jews of Tiberias and the local Bedouin population.

However, in 1740, Jews returned to Tiberias under the invitation of Bedouin prince Dahr el Omar. Rabbi Chaim Abulafia, a kabbalist from Turkey, soon after resettled in Tiberias. He collected money from the Diaspora to sustain the Jewish community in Tiberias, built yeshivas and synagogues, and renovated homes. Rabbi Menahem of Vitbesk and many other great Hassidic Jews settled within Tiberias not too long after that. During this period of time, Tiberias became known as one of the four holiest cities in the Jewish religion, due to its rich history of Jewish scholarship. In fact, throughout the 18th and 19th centuries, Tiberias had an influx of great rabbis into the city, re-establishing the city as a center of Jewish learning. By the beginning of the twentieth century, Tiberias had a population of 3,600, out of which 2,000 were Jewish.

PA TV recently broadcast a song titled ‘Oh Flying Bird‘ which claimed that the city of Tiberias was Palestinian. This is not the first time that PA TV has claimed that areas which are presently in Israel are in fact Palestinian.

Visit United with Israel.

March 31 and Dona Gracia

Sunday, March 31st, 2013

At first glance, March 31 is not a day that particularly stands out in Jewish memory, but it is actually a day of significance.

In 1492, the Alhambra Decree (also known as the Edict of Expulsion) was signed by King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, which led to the expulsion of all Jews from Spain 3 months later on Tisha B’Av 1492.

Some Jews at the time also went into hiding as Crypto-Jews (Conversos). Many went to Portugal, which welcomed Jews in.

Two such Converso families were the Nasi (de Luna) and Benveniste (Mendes) families who eventually joined together in marriage.

In the 1500′s Dona Gracia (Hanna Nasi) took over her husband’s (Francisco Mendes) spice business after his death, building it up, and ending up becoming one of the richest Jewish women in Renaissance Europe.

But what stands out most about Dona Gracia is that she bought the entire city of Tiberias from the Sultan.

She began to rebuild the city, and invited the Jews of Europe to go to Tiberias, where she would give them start-up funds and land, in the hope that the Jews of Europe could finally come back to their home in the Holy Land, and find refuge from unfriendly Europe. Unfortunately, it appears that very few people took her up on her pre-Nefesh B’Nefesh offer.

Dona Gracia herself never visited Israel.

Today there is a Dona Gracia museum in her honor, located in Tiberias.

The Kinneret Continues to Rise

Tuesday, February 12th, 2013

Just since Monday, the Kinneret rose another 2 centimeters to 210.445 meters below sea level, and is now standing at 255 centimeters above the lower red line.

In the past 6 days the Kinneret has risen 11 centimeters.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/the-kinneret-continues-to-rise-2/2013/02/12/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: