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April 16, 2014 / 16 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘today’

MK Uri Ariel: ‘Today begins the Knitted-Kipa Revolution’

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

Chairman of the Knesset State Comptroller’s Committee MK Uri Ariel welcomes the new Bayit Yehudi list for Knesset: “I congratulate the contenders and those who were chosen in the Bayit Yehudi party. Now we are geared toward unifying the ranks and returning the National Orthodox camp to its historic influential position on the political map. Today begins the Knitted-Kipa Revolution.”

Breaking News: Hamas #2 Killed by IDF

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

The Shabak (Israel’s General Secret Service) just announced that Ahmed Jabari, the second in command of the Hamas military, was killed today by the IDF in a surgical strike. He was traveling in his car when it exploded.

Al-Jabari has been credited for the Hamas takeover of Gaza as well as introducing the launching of Kassam rockets into Israel.

Jabari’s son, who was in the car was also killed in the attack.

Palestinians report that the IDF also attacked in Rafiach and Han Younis leaving 8 dead.

Much of the country has now been put on alert in case of retaliatory attacks by Hamas, who have now threatened to launch missiles on Tel Aviv tonight.

Schools around Gaza have announced that school will be canceled tomorrow.

 

Ahmed Jabari with Gilad Shalit

Attacks on Southern Israel, Raising Jewish Children, and Rain in the Land of Israel

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

(((CLICK BELOW TO HEAR AUDIO)))

Yishai and Malkah kick off this week’s show by talking about recent attacks by terrorists on southern Israel and move on to read recently sent e-mails from listeners. They move on to talk about raising children in today’s world and how important it is to raise them with solid and good influence. At around 16:40, they talk about the recent rains that Israel is experiencing and how rain in the Land of Israel is truly a gift. Yishai and Malkah end the segment by further discussing attacks on Southern Israel and how Israel is always a leader when it comes to providing help for other nations in the world, including following Hurricane Sandy in the United States.

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
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The Delegitimization Warfare Begins

Sunday, November 11th, 2012

Please first look at the photo:

It’s criss-crossed the blogosphere and Twitter network like crazy last night. It pretends to be an image of children who, along with the man lying on a stretcher next to them, were allegedly targeted today by Israel’s forces for being terrorists. You can see it here or Twitter-search for it here.

In reality, the picture is four years old. It has nothing to do with anything that happened in Gaza last night. Check it out here.

Why are we seeing it now? Why is it being pushed across the world’s social media networks tonight?

Heavy fighting has going on in southern Israel and inside Gaza since early this evening. It began when an IDF patrol was hit by an anti-tank rocket fired from within Gaza around sundown. Several Israeli servicemen are seriously injured. In a country where most people’s children serve in the defense forces, an attack like this does not go un-noticed.

Throughout Saturday night, Israel has channeled some of its sophisticated weapons, including helicopters and drones, at very carefully selected targets in the Gaza Strip, an area dominated by the Hamas terrorist organization and bristling with tens of thousands of rockets stashed away inside homes, mosques and hospitals.

The terrorists for their part have fired off dozens of rockets. Frightened families throughout most of southern Israel are inside safe rooms and bomb shelters, or within a few seconds’ dash of one, as we write this. School classes throughout the area have been canceled (Sunday is a school day in Israel). This will not prevent foreign media channels from saying – as they will certainly do in the coming hours – that Israel is responding disproportionately.

Militarily, the Palestinian Arabs of Gaza are far less-well equipped with military equipment than the IDF is. But strategically, the Gazan side has the ‘advantage’ of being ready, willing and able to do anything that will un-nerve the Israeli side and bring criticism onto Israeli heads. If this means telling lies, taking steps that provoke Israeli reactions that will certainly injure their neighbors, or firing rockets indiscriminately at towns, farms, homes, buses, cars, schools – well, that’s what they have been doing for years. It’s how they fight.

But there’s another way and that’s via cognitive warfare. By promoting totally bogus lethal narratives, like the photo (at the top of this post) of a cluster of Palestinian Arab children who were allegedly attacked by a cruel and over-armed Israeli military, the Gazans score strategic points that their military weakness would otherwise prevent them from gaining.

If the photo has reached you (and it has reached huge numbers tonight), then they have made you a part of their warfare against us Israelis. What you do next will determine how successful their cowardly and very shabby strategy turns out to be… this time.

Visit This Ongoing War.

The ‘This Is Their Land’ Mentality

Wednesday, November 7th, 2012

The ritual of rockets that periodically pummel Israel’s southern communities includes numerous media interviews with the important people. The journalists attempt to extract from anybody who thinks he is somebody some piece of a resolution for this crazy situation that is unparalleled anywhere in the world.

The first to express himself during last week’s round of rocket fire was President Shimon Peres, who, during a visit to the north, expressed his anger at the situation in the south. “We haven’t seen Shimon Peres this angry in a long time,” the reporter noted.

After Peres came Yair Lapid, a candidate for the premiership: “What is the solution?” asked the reporter. “We must coordinate all the public relations bureaus,” Lapid answered, hurrying to steer the discussion to the topic of his expertise. “I would coordinate all the public relations in the Foreign Ministry.”

Labor Party leader Shelly Yachimovich spoke eloquently – but said nothing memorable. Former defense minister Amir Peretz said that we must build more protective shelters. A security expert jabbered with self-importance, leaving me confused. Eventually I gave up and put on a music station.

A simple truth is hiding behind the cacophony of non-solutions: those responsible for the debacle cannot fix it.

In the mid-90s (the Oslo era) Israel’s “This is our land” mentality switched to “This is their land.” A large swath of influential people in the fields of the arts, communications, politics, security, justice and media are responsible for the transformation. They built their careers on the Oslo era and cannot go back to the pre-Oslo days of “This is our land.”

That is why there is no solution to the missiles screeching into southern Israel from Gaza.

In the “This is our land” days, famous Zionist icon Abba Kovner explained the imperative to conquer Gaza. Kovner did not talk about eliminating terror; he talked about victory. Victory is impossible without moral resolve. Those who want to solve today’s missile problem would be well advised to read Kovner’s battle order, written for IDF troops as they prepared for battle in the 1956 Sinai War: “The will to triumph is a prerequisite for victory.”

The lesson: no containment and no control over the height of the flames, and none of the other anti-army, pseudo-intellectual discourse that dominates the army today. An army must strive for one thing only: victory.

After some words of encouragement, Kovner explains: “Gaza: a living organ torn from the body of the State of Israel.” Kovner takes a moral stance: Gaza is ours!

He continues: “A clenched fist is hovering over the state, a base for the murderous Egyptians,” Kovner says, referring to the security threat to the state.

At the very end of the battle order Kovner mentions the only claim that is being made today, namely the suffering of the people. His portrayal: “Nachal Oz, Be’eri, Kissufim, Nirim – a chain of flourishing settlements facing a hostile border.”

Kovner says, “Fighters smite the enemy…. Smite him again and again.”

He sums up: “The enemy will be destroyed by the sword of the division fighters. Forward to battle and to victory!”

Smell the Grass

Tuesday, November 6th, 2012

When was the last time you walked across a field of grass?

Wait, a whole bunch of you just looked up at the ceiling and thought…what the heck is she talking about? You probably walk through a field of grass every day, don’t you? Well, if not a field, a lawn, right?

Israel is a land that was, according to the Bible and logic, very fertile. I believe I read somewhere that when the Romans conquered Judea and sent the Jews into exile, they salted the earth to prevent our return. I googled it…yeah, google is now a verb… and there are more than 50,000,000 references to it. I didn’t click on them to see if it was true or not. The bottom line is still the same.

Much of Israel is short on water – we have desert as our southern half and even towards the north, we don’t really have lush, green mountains. Where we have fields of grass, they are usually cultivated and watered. Otherwise, they aren’t really grass, but rather weeds that grow in the winter months and die in the summer.

I went to a Microsoft conference today – they put on a light and dance show that was incredible. I have to write about the amazing technologies I saw there, the wonderful things Microsoft’s Steve Ballmer said about Israel. I want a Surface computer SO badly… I would love a Windows 8 phone. I ache for a convertible laptop and have given up the idea of buying a laptop until I can afford one. Just wow…

And with my head filled with the wonders of what Microsoft is bringing to the world… I began the walk back to my car. And, as I crossed the road, I opted for the shortcut so many others were taking…across the grass.

I grew up in America – where there is so much grass – we all had front lawns and back lawns and had to cut the grass regularly. I can still remember the smell of cut grass, of grass after a rain. I stopped thinking of Microsoft and looked down at the grass – there were people in front of me, people behind me. I couldn’t stop to touch it, though deep down I longed to.

I don’t know if you’ve ever stopped to think about the wonders of grass (the legitimate kind, naturally) – but it’s important to take that time in life – to feel the grass under your feet as you walk. I’ll remember Microsoft’s products from today… but I think part of me will also remember the grass.

Visit A Soldier’s Mother.

Don’t Drink Alone

Tuesday, November 6th, 2012

It occurred to me that with so much of this website being devoted to politics and the Islamist threat, we should probably use some of our space contemplating the simple pleasures of life. So, today, when both the United States of America and the NRP-Bayit Yehudi Party are facing the vote that will decide their foreseeable future, I figured it was a good time to contemplate the notion of having a cup of coffee and reading the morning paper with your dog sitting in your lap.

The picture was taken in downtown Jerusalem this week, and in my humble opinion spells out the idea of civilization most successfully.

We have cats, so we can only do the coffee and paper thing with them at home. But I assure you it is just as civilized.

Postcard from Israel: Nachlaot

Sunday, November 4th, 2012

The picturesque Nachlaot neighbourhood in Jerusalem started out as what we might call today ‘social housing’. From 1875 onwards benefactors such as Moses Montefiore began building new neighbourhoods outside the walls of the Old City to house the growing Jewish population and relieve some of the overcrowding and squalor of the Jewish Quarter. Thus, Nachlaot is in fact a cluster of fused neighbourhoods, with each one originally having a specific ethnic character and its own synagogue.

After the War of Independence the neighbourhood absorbed many refugees expelled by the Jordanians from the Old City, as well as new immigrants from North Africa, and over-crowding and poverty became rife. Those who could moved out to the city’s newer neighbourhoods. A major renovation project in the 1990s updated Nachlaot with facilities such as modern plumbing and today the neighbourhood’s narrow lanes, archways and hidden courtyards lend it a charm which has made it popular once again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visit CifWatch.com.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/cifwatch/postcard-from-israel-nachlaot/2012/11/04/

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