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October 20, 2014 / 26 Tishri, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘Torah Tidbits’

All Star Israel Softball League: Smooth sailing for Segwayz

Wednesday, May 9th, 2012

In the second week of the All Star Israel Softball League season, and the opener for Segwayz, the outcome was never in doubt, as Ari Sussman helped his team glide to a smooth 13-0 victory over Jerry’s Kids.

Sussman commended his team after the game, deflecting credit from himself. “Our defense is really humming along, and our power is downright electric. With that great Segwayz balance, it’s just a pleasure to be along for the ride.”

Ari Kafka earned the shut-out on the mound.

Meanwhile, after low-scoring affairs in their respective season openers, the Brooklyn Lightning and Torah Tidbits came out gunning. Torah Tidbits jumped out to a four-run lead in the first, but the Lightning battled back, and the game remained tight until the last inning. Tidbits entered the final frame with a 10-9 lead, when a clutch two-out bases-loaded triple gave the Lightning a 12-10 victory.

Tidbits have lost two straight games by the slim total of 3 runs, but they took heart in their performance; every Tidbits player recorded at least one hit, and Eytan Baratz, the team’s batting leader, continued to shine, knocking in several RBIs and firing in another assist from left field to the plate.

In a rematch of last season’s Holyland Series, Lobos looked for revenge, but it was Café Rimon who prevailed – though all agreed that this encounter would pale in significance to a potential postseason meeting.

Captain Nussi Jacobovitch got Rimon on the scoreboard early, doubling in Pinny Itzkowitz, and then himself scoring on a Yitzy Miller double. Rimon extended the lead on Chaim Webber’s bases-loaded triple, while Lobos responded with a pair of runs in the fourth. Pitcher Yaacov Ehrlich hung on to the tense lead the rest of the way, and in the top of the last Miller tripled home Jacobowitz and Itzkowitz for insurance.

In other action, Bagelsbergs pulled away from Janglo for a 14-6 victory. And it was another impressive victory for Lakewood Heimeshe Bake Shoppe, who faced Segwayz in their second game of the week, keeping their record perfect with a 10-1 win.

For all the latest news, schedules and scores, visit www.israelsoftball.com.

Big Opening Day in All Star Israel Softball League

Thursday, May 3rd, 2012

There was lots of exciting opening day action in the All Star Israel Softball League, as fans were treated to two tight pitchers’ duels and two big slugfests.

In the season premier, perennial contender Jerry’s Kids had veteran pitcher Abba Stein on the mound, and he allowed only a solitary run against newcomers Lakewood Heimishe Bake Shoppe – but that run was enough for a win, as rookie phenom Dovi Fass fired a complete game shut-out. Yisrael Guttman broke the scoreless tie with an RBI triple in the fifth, and great defense locked down the 1-0 win for Lakewood Heimishe Bake Shoppe.

In another defensive classic, Bagelsbergs and Torah Tidbits each looked perfect on the mound and in the field, before Bagelsberg’s three-sport star Yisrael Feld and Jacob Kellner hit a pair of solo home runs in the last three innings. Pitcher A.J Fuchs earned the victory, getting out of several Torah Tidbits threats in the final few frames.

Behind the plate

Lobos launched their campaign to recapture the title by breaking open a close game with the Brooklyn Lightning.  Last season’s runner-up, Lobos took a tense 4-2 lead into the sixth inning, then knocked in five runs, followed by a parade of eight more in the seventh, for a 17-4 final.

In the nightcap, reigning champs Café Rimon began their title defense in typical fashion, combining consistency, power, and crafty pitching for a convincing victory over Janglo. Captain Nussi Jacobovitch looked to add his name to those of his dynastic brothers on the Holyland Series Trophy, powering his team with clutch hitting, as Rimon scored in every inning but one, while star pitcher Yaacov Ehrlich allowed only one run, for the win.

For Standings, Scores, News and Schedules go to www.israelsoftball.com.

A Summary of Chanukah Laws

Tuesday, December 20th, 2011

The following general overview of Chanukah is from the Torah Tidbits, a publication of OU Israel. This will be a combination of a halachic review, practical suggestions, useful information, and more. Do not take anything written here as “the last word,” if you have any doubts, check things out with your Rav.

General Pointers

In general, one should prepare his Chanukiya (candelabra) during the afternoon so that there will not be a delay in lighting at the proper time. This is especially so on Friday, Erev Shabbat-Chanuka because things get kind of hectic as Shabbat approaches. (And especially not so for Motza’ei Shabbat lighting – Obviously, no preparation for lighting after Shabbat may be done on Shabbat).

Some have the custom of setting up their Chanukiya in the morning for the evening (this goes for every day – except Shabbat, of course). This not only serves the practical purpose of being ready to light on time without undue delay, but it also commemorates the practice in the Beit HaMikdash called Hatavat HaNeirot, whereby the Kohen (Gadol) tended the Menora and prepared it in the morning for kindling in the late, late afternoon. Since our lighting on Chanuka directly commemorates the lighting of the Menora in the Beit HaMikdash (Temple) , this suggestion provides a nice “added touch” to the mitzva and symbolism of Chanuka lighting.

AL HANISIM is added to every Amida (18 Benedictions prayer) and Birkat HaMazon (Blessing after a meal) through-out Chanuka. (There is no reference to Chanuka in Bracha Mei’ein Shalosh.)

Forgetting AL HANISIM does NOT invalidate either the Amida or Birkat HaMazon. That means that neither is to be repeated because AL HANISIM was omitted.  However, if one realizes the omission before the end of the Amida, AL HANISIM can be said right before YIHYU L’RATZON, with the modified intro below. In Birkat HaMazon, an omitted AL HANISIM becomes a HARACHA- MAN, right before HARACHAMAN HU Y’ZAKEINU, as follows (there are variant texts for this)…

POINT  Brachot (including SHECHECYANU) should be recited BEFORE beginning to light the candles. This complies with the general rule for Brachot of Mitzva, that they be recited immediately before performance of the mitzva, if possible. This means, that even on the eighth night, don’t start lighting the candles until you finish both brachot.

POINT  Opinions differ, but a common practice is to place the first candle (or oil cup) in the right side of the Chanukiya. If one lights at the doorpost, then the first candle should be closest to the doorpost, even if it is the left side of the Chanukiya. From the second night on, the custom (one of the customs) is to “load” the Chanukiya from right to left, but to light it, left to right. At the doorpost, one loads it from the doorpost out, and lights it starting with the candle closest to the doorpost. Loading and lighting direction is not crucial to the performance of the mitzva, but there are reasons for the various practices.

POINT  The essential performance of the mitzva of Chanuka Lights is the lighting of a single candle each night. The custom that we follow of increasing the number of candles each night is considered HIDUR MITZVA (enhancement of the mitzva). This is not to suggest that anyone should follow the original practice of (just) one candle each night. The Jewish People “across the board” accepted upon itself – a long time ago – the current practice of lighting the number of candles that correspond to the day of Chanuka. One practice that has developed because of this, is to begin reciting HANEIROT HALALU after the first candle is lit, while lighting the others. Alternatively, one can wait until the lighting is done to say HANEIROT HALALU.

POINT  One should not just light the Chanuka candles and then go on to business as usual, but rather one should look at the candles for a while, ponder G-d’s miracles, spend some time with the family talking about the message of Chanuka and how it relates to our time, play a little dreidel, sing a song or two, have a snack, have some Chanuka fun.

POINT  It is recommended to learn some Torah, share a Dvar Torah, have a family shiur, or something like that, right after candle lighting (or sometime in the evening). The decrees of the Greeks included a ban on learning Torah. Our celebration of Chanuka marks our freedom from Greek oppression, including the ability to learn Torah in public without fear. So let’s do just that!

POINT  There is a dispute as to whether the bracha ends NER SHEL CHANUKA or NER CHANUKA. One should follow his own (or family) minhag (custom), if you have one. If not, ask your Rav which wording you should use. (A third opinion is to combine the words with L’HADLIK NER SHEL’CHANUKA.

Title: Dalet Amot

Wednesday, August 2nd, 2006

Title: Dalet Amot
Author: Rabbi Ari Enkin

 

      A breezy refresher course in some basics about Judaism, Dalet Amot is a necessary addition to bookshelves in Jewish homes, libraries and schools.

 

      Rabbi Ari Enkin’s choice of topics and his lighthearted yet serious approach to concepts and practices often forgotten in the rush of daily life makes suitable reading material for new ba’alei teshuva and life-long Orthodox Jews. The book’s clearly printed text is easy to understand, and the frequent humor on its pages facilitates a pleasant reading experience. The serious nature of providing correct information to uninformed or misinformed readers is paramount, and the author makes his points tactfully from cover to cover.

 

      Decent behavior is what Judaism is all about, and Rabbi Enkin’s book endorses it in a forthright, not-preachy manner. From pages 36-41, the author succinctly lists halachic sources that dictate proper eating habits, respectful food disposal, Grace After Meals priorities and required table manners. Sloppiness, waste and other boorish behavior are simply not “Jewish.”

 

      Geniza and the proper disposal of holy writings are enduring concerns in Jewish communities. The author notes his halachic sources when he specifies how Jewish written materials should be discarded after they become tattered and useless. Enkin presents the case for disposing of writings that lack Hashem’s name (e.g., Torah Tidbits, synagogue and school notices) by wrapping them in bags and putting them in garbage cans. He states that he is “opposed to the practice of taking every HaModia, Yated, etc. to a geniza. It horribly wastes mammon hekdesh and cemetery space. This is an issue that rabbis should bring to an end.”

 

      Menschlichkeit, decent behavior, extends to intellectual propriety and excess. The author addresses this troublesome area when he examines the topic of “celebrating” the death of the wicked, the deaths of haters of Israel and anti-Semites. Enkin presents “celebration” as an emotional response rather than as a party or ritual practice. It is a concise look at Jewish hashkafa, philosophy. A multifaceted insight into correct Jewish thought processes, it can properly arm Jewish readers for a correct Jewish response to the future deaths of additional enemies. The irony of Enkin’s closing comment on this chapter is a clue to how much we Jews must maintain proper perspective.

 

      Other chapters in Dalet Amot examine the proper observance of Shabbat and holidays, avoiding cruelty to animals, interpersonal issues and a female’s rights and roles and contributions in halachically directed Jewish life. Mystical and supernatural issues are touched upon, as well as other topics of wide-ranging interest.

 

      Readers might be puzzled regarding the spelling of the book’s title. Instead of the word “daled” with two “d’s,” in his title, the author used a “t” at the end. He addressed the issue by saying ” The letter dalet is spelled dalet-lamed-tav. The ‘d’ sound in the last letter of the name ‘Yocheved,’ for instance, emerges from the letter. There is a difference. After much research it was concluded that the fourth letter of the alef-beit is truly ‘dalet‘ and is etymologically related to the Hebrew word for ‘door.’ The entire book was prepared with Sephardic pronunciation to allow for clarity and easier reading.

 

      Stores and individuals may order copies at rabbiari@hotmail.com or call 011-972-52-579-1773.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/title-dalet-amot/2006/08/02/

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