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July 31, 2016 / 25 Tammuz, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘traffic’

List of Roads Closed Due to War in South

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

As reported by Ynet: Road 34, Road 232, Road 25 and Road 241 are closed due to fighting and concern for public safety in the event of rocket attacks.

Traffic control police are directing drivers at the region.

Malkah Fleisher

Over Here, my Rain Is Happy!

Monday, November 12th, 2012

“I’m singing in the rain, I’m singing in the rain, what a wonderful feeling, I’m happy again!”

Before Shabbat, the Heavens opened with a symphony of thunder and lightning, and the great blessing of rain washed over the Land of Israel in answer to our prayers. Like I do every year with the very first rain, I hurried outside and danced in joy, laughing happily as the raindrops splashed on my face.

“Raindrops keep falling on my head… da da da da da da da da da da da… nothings worrying me!”

Back in the house, I opened the door to the terrace so I could hear the splattering of rain on the aluminum roof. What a wonderful sound! “What a glorious feeling! I’m happy again!” The clatter of raindrops sounded like the clinging of coins in a beggar’s cup. “Rain, rain, don’t go away – stay with us another day!”

When lightening lit up the sky and thunder shook the heavens, I recited their special blessings with exuberant joy. What a privilege to be in the Holy Land when it rains! It’s like every drop is a kiss from Hashem, assuring us that He loves us.

Yesterday, driving to Tel Aviv, it was pouring. I sang all the way! What a blessing to be stuck in a long traffic jam in Israel because of the rain! For nearly 2000 years, we’ve prayed to come home to Israel, and now that Hashem, in His infinite kindness, has allowed us to rebuild our Land, what a joy that we have long traffic jams! It’s a sign that the country is booming!  Would Moshe Rabanu have complained to sit in a traffic jam in Israel? Would Rashi have grumbled? No way!

I can’t help comparing our great joy in Israel over the rain to the recent devastating rains in New York. There it was a disaster. You want to know why? Look at this, from the Torah giant, the “Ohr Somayach,” Rabbi Meir Simcha HaCohen from Dvinsk, from his famous commentary on the Torah, the “Meshech Chochmah,”

“If a Jew thinks that Berlin (New York) is Jerusalem, then a raging storm-wind will uproot him by his trunk – a hurricane will arise and spread its roaring waves, and it will swallow and destroy, and flood forth without pity” (Meshech Chochmah, Pg. 171).

In the same light, the Torah giant, Rabbi Yaacov Emden, writes in the Introduction to his famous siddur, “The Beit Yaacov,”

“When it seems to us, in our present peaceful existence outside of the Land of Israel, that we have found another Eretz Yisrael and Jerusalem, this is to me the deepest, most obvious, most outstanding, and direct cause of all of the awesome, frightening, monstrous, unimaginable destructions that we have experienced in the Diaspora.”

In the meantime, I’m yours truly, just singing and dancing in the rain.

Tzvi Fishman

Another Season In The Books/A Remarkable Brother-In-Law

Wednesday, November 7th, 2012

What an unusual postseason it was.

The Yankees looked inept against the ferocious Tigers and the Tigers in turn looked toothless against the San Francisco Giants as they were swept in the World Series.

Until the World Series, it was a very successful year for Detroit. The team drew over three million fans during the regular season and downtown was humming before and after Tigers games.

On the last Sunday of October, when the Tigers went down to defeat in Game Four of the World Series, I attended the World Series of dinners.

I dodged the football traffic as the Detroit Lions were playing at home in Ford Field, only about 30 feet beyond the left field scoreboard at the Tigers’ Comerica Park home.

The afternoon football traffic was just leaving and the evening baseball traffic was just arriving as I went a few blocks further to Detroit’s largest hotel (adjoining the General Motors headquarters) for the annual dinner of Yeshiva Beth Yehudah. It’s the school I attended, the school my daughter graduated from, the school all my grandchildren went or go to.

I had harbored thoughts of leaving the dinner early in order to be parked in my favorite chair in time for the first pitch. But it wouldn’t have been fair to the guest speaker, former first lady Laura Bush. After all, I stayed last year for Vice President Joe Biden.

Mrs. Bush was a big hit and told of her three trips to Israel with her husband – two while he was president and one when he was governor of Texas. She also told of her father being in one of the military units that liberated a concentration camp and the effect it on him. He had photos he saved for the rest of his life.

As a former teacher and librarian, she bonded with the audience of over 2,000 (the largest Orthodox dinner of its kind) and I was glad I stayed to the end. The dinner ended at 8:07 p.m. – about the same time Game Four started. I made it home for the second inning and got to see nine innings as the game went 10 innings before Detroit’s great baseball season ended too early.

It will be a most interesting off-season, though. Especially in Boston, New York and Los Angeles. While the Tigers just need a bit of tweaking here and there, the Red Sox, Dodgers and Yankees need major overhauls. You can expect all the aforementioned teams to go after free agent Josh Hamilton, who hit 43 homers for the Texas Rangers.

But pitching stops good hitting, as San Francisco Giants fans know.

* * * * *

My brother-in-law was the most talented man I ever knew.

Rabbi Samuel Kunda, z”l, passed away a few weeks ago at the age of 67. Illness robbed him of much of his unique creativity during his 60s, but his jovial personality, terrific smile and ever-present chuckle remained part of his DNA.

He was – if you’ll pardon the comparison – the closest thing to a Jewish Santa Claus there was.

Rabbi Kunda’s relationship with youngsters made him a popular yeshiva rebbe before he became an internationally known producer of Jewish educational materials for children and their parents.

Shum, as my sister, Naomi, a”h, called him when others were out of earshot, left us with numerous tapes, books and pictures and songs. His artistic talent adorned the walls in my home and sukkah for decades, but he never got around to the project I wanted him to tackle – “Boruch Goes to Ebbets Field.”

Samuel had his own memories of going to the fabled ballpark of the Brooklyn Dodgers and seeing his favorite player, Duke Snider, hit a home run.

With his talent and imagination and Dodgers players with names of Duke, Pee Wee (Reese), Campy (Roy Campanella) and Preacher (Roe), “Boruch goes to Ebbets Field” would have been a big hit.

Shmuel also experienced Tiger Stadium in an unusual way. On one of the family visits here in the 1980s, I took them to the Tigers’ old ballpark when the team was on the road and we had a picnic and ballgame.

Casey Kunda managed all of the kids and even hit an inside-the-park home run and circled the bases twice before allowing one of the kids to tag him out. He made sure the kids always won.

Irwin Cohen

Palestinians and Foreign Provocateurs Block Road 443

Tuesday, October 16th, 2012

Some 30 Palestinians and foreign provocateurs blocked traffic on road 443 on Tuesday afternoon.  Road 443 is a main highway that connects Jerusalem and Tel Aviv via the city of Modiin.

Police and Border Police cleared out the protesters and traffic continued on its way.

Jewish Press News Briefs

A Lost License

Wednesday, August 29th, 2012

I felt ill at ease in a strange way when our daughter drove off in our old Dodge Caravan to pick up my son from yeshiva. She was new at the wheel, and there was plenty of traffic to maneuver around in Lakewood on Friday afternoons. An innocent, precious neshamah in my eyes who didn’t belong on the busy roads, she wanted to help out. So when I was called later to the scene of the accident, the One Above seemed to confirm that my assessment had been totally accurate.

Not seeing oncoming traffic, our daughter attempted to cross Route 9, the thoroughfare that passes through our town. She was astonished when an even larger, faster van appeared out of nowhere and sideswiped the driver’s side of our caravan. After making a spin and coming to a stop, our daughter walked unscathed to the sidewalk where a crowd gathered around her, guiding her as she confronted the law enforcement officers who were dispatched to the scene.

Unable to focus on the ramifications of the damage around her, our daughter did what she always does: she told the truth. She explained how she had proceeded to cross Route 9 because she hadn’t seen any cars speeding toward her. After the collision she watched in a daze as the tow truck lifted our crippled van onto the bed of its truck and police officers walked between her and the angry driver of the other vehicle involved in the crash, trying to gather as much information as possible about the collision.

When it came time for a kind police officer to return our daughter’s driver’s license to her, it was not to be found. It had vanished. The police officer explained that he had been called to many accidents that day and, as a high-ranking officer in the police force, he was worn out and was not his usual, organized self. He kept apologizing while searching for it in the front section of his car. But he just could not find the license.

The officer asked us for our home address in order to bring over the license once it had been found. He assumed that it had fallen into some hidden area of his car, and that after taking things apart at the station he would be able to come to our home and return our daughter’s license to us. We parted, wished each other well, and gratefully took our shaken but uninjured daughter back home to safety.

Later, before candle lighting for Shabbat, there was a knock on the door. With help from Above, the officer apologetically gave the license back to us – too embarrassed to give my daughter a ticket for her mistake after he had been in error himself. While our van was now out of commission, our daughter and her driving record were still in good shape.

Jodi Jakob

Mt. Carmel Tunnels to Be Used as Bomb Shelters Should Iran Attack

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012

The idea of using the Mt. Carmel tunnels as public shelters already came up 2 years ago when they were initially opened for traffic, but now the idea is being considered as a practical solution should a war break out.

Haifa Mayor Yona Yahav has already approached Home Front Command and National Emergency Council officials asking to coordinate the use of the tunnels as public shelters. This is accompanied by a request from officials involved to organize adequate parking space for the thousands of cars belonging to the people who will arrive at the tunnels seeking protection.

Yahav also asked the Ministry of Industry and Trade and the Ministry of Transportation to declare the tunnels an essential emergency workplace, in order to prevent worker now-shows which could cause the closure of the tunnels.

The Carmel Tunnels (Minharot HaCarmel) are a set of road tunnels in and around Haifa, Israel. The tunnels’ purpose is to reduce road congestion in the Haifa area and to provide an alternative route of reaching the eastern and central parts of the city, Haifa Bay and the Krayot area to and from Israel’s central coastal plain without having to travel through traffic-congested downtown Haifa, having to drive up and across the Carmel Mountain or bypassing Haifa from the east, along the edge of the Jezreel Valley.

The tunnels cut the travel time from the Haifa South interchange in the west to the Checkpost interchange in the east from 30–50 minutes down to 6 minutes.

The tunnels were opened to traffic on December 1, 2010.

As part of the preparations for the worst case scenario, a map of the businesses in the city was recently completed by the Haifa Municipality, with the intention of ordering businesses to remain open in an emergency situation. Should the owner refuse, options are being examined for opening the businesses against their will and thereby forcing them to sell essential items. Cellular communication providers and gas stations are being targeted specifically by the municipality, to prevent their closure during an emergency situation.

Mayor Yahav told IDF Radio that since the day those tunnels have opened he had been contemplating using them as mass bomb shelters.

“I’ve been investigating for a long time the possibility of sheltering tens of thousands underground. But no one so far has been able to tell me how much oxygen would be required for, say, 30 or 40 thousand people.”

During World War 2, the bombing of London and especially the Blitz led to the use of many tube (underground train) stations as air-raid shelters. Closed stations and unfinished sections of new lines were also used. The shelters were well suited to their purpose, but some stations could still be breached by a direct hit, and, indeed, a few German attacks did result in serious loss of life, most notably at Balham and Bounds Green in October 1940 and Bank in January 1941. A still worse disaster was a crowd crush accident at the unfinished Bethnal Green in March 1943.

Jacob Edelist

Israel’s Transportation Revolution is Underway

Tuesday, July 17th, 2012

The Ministry of Transport published last week a primarily web-based campaign showing the impending changes, transformations and expansions undertaken in air, sea, and land transportation in the country. The Ministry of Transport, headed by Minister Israel Katz, has been working intensively in recent years to develop and implement far-reaching programs that could affect every Israeli citizen’s life. Videos distributed by the Ministry of Transport online show the expected investment of about 100 billion Shekels over the next six to eight years. The Ministry’s publicized objective is the promotion of national transportation that will leverage economic development, connect the periphery to the major cities, and place Israel among the most advanced countries in terms of transportation.

It is no secret that  transportation development has suffered neglect and lack of promotion in the past two decades. Until recently, roads have not been revamped, the train’s route was not developed, and traffic jams across the country intensified due to an increase in the number of private vehicles. Today, most citizens own at least one car, and in many cases two, a situation demanding immediate solutions. Lately, however, Israel has witnessed developments everywhere. Across the country, from north to south, there are new roads, interchanges have been built, railroads placed and more.

In Jerusalem, the Ministry promises to construct a new entrance. The road will be called “Route 16” and will reach downtown. The road will contain mostly tunnels and should relieve traffic congestion. The busy highway 1 linking Tel Aviv to Jerusalem will become a two-track road which should, according to transportation officials, solve the heavy load on this road.

Also, a special railway line of about 57 km should  be open by the year 2017, which will connect Tel Aviv to Jerusalem by only 28 minutes travel.

In the North, one of the major projects that the Ministry of Transport presented is the establishment of the Golani Junction interchange – a huge project that began this year and is scheduled to be concluded in 2013. The junction will connect in the future to a network of highways and to Highway 6, which will allow a smoother trip with no traffic lights from the north of the country to its center.

Another project is the extension of  Highway 6, Israel’s most significant highway. Today it ends in the north at the Ein Tut intersection near Yokneam. In the future it will be expanded to Shlomi, taking the highway even further North. As for the southern segment of the highway, The Ministry of Transport promised to expand the highway  to the outskirts of Be’erSheva, which will further connect the south to central Israel.

A more grandiose project is the “Ha’Emek Train” – a flagship project of the Ministry which has set to develop the Valley Railroad, establishing a fast connection along the Haifa – Nazareth – Beit Shean rout. This project is scheduled to be ended by 2016. Minister Katz briefly introduced the project’s future benefits for the entire region: “The Jordanians are interested in promoting such a project, which will allow them to export and import cargo by train, arriving at the port of Haifa.”

In the center of the country, the Ministry of Transport presented the light rail which should constitute in the near future an extensive transportation network in the greater Tel Aviv area. The first line to be built is the Red Line, which will connect Tel Aviv, Ramat Gan, Petach Tikva, Bnei Brak and Bat Yam. The 11-billion-Shekel project will include additional lines, and will be completed gradually by 2017.

Furthermore, the ministry is establishing in the Sharon area a transportation system of special buses called BRT lines, which will have its separate lanes. The BRT lines  are intended to transport large numbers of passengers. The network is scheduled to be opened in 2014.

In the south of the country, modern rail lines should connect the Tel Aviv metropolitan area to the south of the country, including Eilat, and will allow passengers on the train to get from Tel Aviv to Eilat in two hours. At Timna,  a new international airport will replace the existing one in Eilat. The new airport will be called “Ramon Airport,” named after Ilan Ramon, an Air Force pilot and the first Israeli astronaut, and Assaf Ramon, Ilan’s son who was also an air force pilot and who was recently killed in a training accident. The Ministry of Transport did not supply an exact date of completion for this project.

Tom Nisani

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/israel/israels-transportation-revolution-is-underway/2012/07/17/

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