web analytics
November 25, 2014 / 3 Kislev, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Tzippi Livni’

Israel’s Secret Retreat Map

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

There is a code of silence about what is being discussed in current Israeli Palestinian negotiations. However, possible disastrous results of those talks were reached almost nine years ago.

In March, 2005, Yuli Edelstein, then a deputy government minister and now the speaker of the Knesset, appeared at the Alon Shvut community center in Gush Etzion in which he reported to a stunned audience that the February 20, 2005 retreat decision of the Israeli government did not only apply to Katif and to four small Jewish communities in Samaria.

Edelstein warned that the February 20, 2005 Israeli government decision was to redraw the areas of Jewish residency in the almost all areas that Israel acquired in the 1967 war.

The new map, approved by the Israeli government, he said, was immediately posted on the web site of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, and is posted there to this day for all American government officials to peruse.

That Israeli government approved retreat map means that an additional 63 Jewish communities can be expelled and dismantled in their entirety by an Israeli government decision that has already been made.

Without any further government decision, the Israeli government is authorized to order the IDF to implement the next stages of the February 20, 2005 Israel government retreat decision

Prominent members of that Israeli government included Benyamin Netanyahu, now the prime minister of Israel, Tzippi Livni, then and now the Justice Minister of Israel, and Shimon Peres, now the president of Israel.

Jewish communities slated for destruction under the 2005 Israeli government decision are spread throughout Samaria, Judea, Hevron and the entire Jordan Valley, demarcated on the National Geographic Atlas as parts of the “west bank”, alluding to the west bank of the Jordan River

However, this Israeli government approved retreat map remains unknown in Israel.

It has never been posted by the Israeli government nor has this retreat map ever or discussed in the Israeli public domain – not in the media, not in the Knesset and not in the current Israeli government, for fear of massive public opposition.

That February 20th, 2005 retreat decision empowers the Israeli Security Establishment to implement surrender of almost all of Samaria, Judea, Hevron, and the entire Jordan Valley to an entity which remains in a state of war with the state and Israel.

In other words, the conclusion of current Israel Palestinian talks has already been reached.

Here is the Israel government approved retreat map which the government of Israel should share with the Israeli public, the Knesset, and the media.

retreat map

Visit Behind the News in Israel.

The Linkage between Palestinian Refugees and Arab Countries

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

To the contrary of what Tzippi Livni claims, there is a direct linkage between the Palestinian refugee crisis and that of Jewish refugees from Arabic speaking countries.

The Jewish Press reported that Israeli chief negotiator Tzippi Livni stated, “There is no connection between the Palestinian refugees and the Arabic countries,” when asked about her position on Jewish refugees from Arabic speaking countries. As an Israeli citizen who happens to have a masters’ degree in Middle Eastern Studies, I must emphasize that this statement could not be further from the truth. Furthermore, if Israel’s chief negotiator truly believes this, then our whole negotiations with the Palestinians are being led by an individual who is quite removed from the Middle Eastern reality.

Aside from the fact that such statements undermine core Israeli positions that should be emphasized at every available possibility, her arguments purely don’t hold historical validity. Jerusalem Online News recently reported that Palestinian Grand Mufti Haj Amin Al Husseini, who orchestrated numerous terrorist attacks against Jews during the British Mandate period, “instigated the Farhud massacre that resulted in the slaughter of 800 members of the Baghdad Jewish community in 1941.” When World War II ended, the pro-Nazis forces within Iraq that committed the Farhud against the Iraqi Jewish community were released and led persecutions against the 2,600 year old Iraqi Jewish community that would ultimately lead to the community’s expulsion from the country.

The Iraqi Jewish community was not the only one within the Arab world to suffer directly as a result of Israel’s Independence and Palestinian objections to it. As Egypt’s delegate to the UN emphasized in 1947, “The lives of one million Jews living in Muslim countries will be jeopardized by partition.” Evidently, Arab leaders at the time of Israel’s establishment saw a direct link between the Palestine partition and the right of Jews to live safely within the Arab world. As the persecutions against Arabic-speaking Jews increased in the wake of the Palestinian refugee crisis, a linkage between Palestinian refugees and the Arabic countries should be indisputable.

Starting soon after the Egyptian delegate said this up through the 1960’s, anti-Jewish riots, massacres, property confiscations, official state-sanctioned discrimination and other abuses would compel the majority of Mizrahi Jews to leave the Arab world, where in some places their existence predated Islam itself. The number of Jewish refugees from Arabic speaking countries is estimated to be between 850,000 and 1,000,000, a number significantly higher than the 750,000 Palestinian refugees who fled the violence surrounding Israel’s establishment. In some countries, such as Iraq and Egypt, Jews were outright expelled, not even being given the option to remain.

Given that there is truly a direct correlation between the two refugee crisis’, an Israeli negotiator who truly cares about solving the Palestinian-Israeli conflict should politely tell the Palestinians, the Americans, and every one else who seeks to contribute towards Palestinian-Israeli peace negotiations that there cannot be compensation for Palestinian refugees without Jewish refugees from Arabic countries receiving the same privilege. The linkage between the two refugee crises should be emphasized at every available opportunity and never dismissed by an Israeli official. An Israeli politician who doesn’t comprehend this basic Middle Eastern history should not be leading the peace negotiations with the Palestinians on the Israeli end. The cries, sorrow and pain of roughly half of the Israeli population is depending on it.

Erekat: First 26 Arab Terrorist Prisoners to be Released Aug. 13

Monday, August 5th, 2013

Saeb Erekat has told the Arab Palestinian newspaper Ma’an that the first 26 of 104 Arab prisoners will be released in a little more than a week, on August 13, according to the Arab news outlet Maan.

Erekat, the chief negotiator for the Arabs, said that the 104 prisoners will be released in four stages. Israel has said the continued release of prisoners will depend on the progress made in the discussions.

The Israeli families of those murdered by the Arab prisoners their government threatens to release continue attempts to stop the government from going ahead with it.

The first meeting in the renewed talks between the Israelis and the Arab Palestinians took place last week in Washington, with secretary of state John Kerry playing the eager host.

The next meeting is expected to be held during the second week of August.  Member of Knesset, Justice Minister and chief negotiator for Israel, Tzippi Livni, said on Saturday that the next meetings will rotate between locations in Israel and in the disputed territories.

Erekat also said that he and his negotiating team are insisting that all final status issues be put on the negotiating table during the current discussions.  Those issues include Jerusalem, refugees, water and settlements.

The talks have a nine month timetable, but the timing is far less of an issue than is the question of how the parties will handle the tough issues, which include every one that the Arab Palestinians insisted would be covered during these discussions.

Mofaz Wins Kadima Primary Polls by 62% to Livni’s 38%

Tuesday, March 27th, 2012

With all the votes counted, Shaul Mofaz became the new chairman of Kadima with 61.7%, to Tzippi Livni’s 37.23%.

Out of 95 thousand registered Kadima party members, only 40% voted by 10 p.m., when the polls closed. Shaul Mofaz and Tzippi Livni struggled  throughout the day to persuade members to get out to the polls and vote.

After congratulating her rival on his win, Livni stated  that she was not going to answer questions regarding her future political path. “It has been a two-months-long, long day. I’m going to sleep,” she told her followers at her campaign headquarters in Tel Aviv.

Some Israeli political commentators are expecting Livni to retire from Kadima and either take a break from politics, or join forces with the new claimant on the Israeli political center, former journalist and TV host Yair Lapid.

Regardless of Tuesday’s vote, it is unclear how Kadima would be able to sustain its status as the largest faction in the Knesset. This means that the war over the political center in Israel will resume, and voters will be “treated” to many acts of realignment, as well as a slew of strange bedfellows.

Even before the polls closed, it was rumored that Haim Ramon was planning to resign as Chair of the Kadima Council. Along with the Mofaz win, this may suggest that the party is moving to the right. It may also mean that Kadima could not be taken for granted as partnering with the left on issues such as  the religious vs. secular tensions.

When Kadima had been established by Ariel Sharon, Mofaz, who was then running to become the new head of the Likud party, was initially reluctant to join him, warning that an alliance with leftists who supported the Oslo accords and a return to the pre-1967 lines, was dangerous. Mofaz then coined the memorable slogan: “You don’t leave a home,” a slogan he abandoned and joined Kadima when it became clear he would not win the leadership post in Likud.

As Defense Minister, Mofas carried out the evacuation of Gush Katif.

Still, ideologically speaking, Mofaz remains further to the right than Livni. On the other hand, since he stated his goal to be the next prime minister of Israel, it is unclear if he would settle for a “mere” cabinet position in a coalition government under Netanyahu.

Chairman of  the Knesset Finance Committee, United Torah Judaism’s MK Moshe Gafni, may have sensed this change when he said Monday night that Tzipi Livni’s loss in the primaries came because she had been attacking the ultra-Orthodox community relentlessly over the past two years. “Just as [Tommi Lapid's] Shinui party has disappeared from the political map, and all the hatred parties are gone, Kadima voters today  said no to hatred and incitement against the ultra-Orthodox society.”

In the end, a weaker Kadima party will bolster Netanyahu’s chances in next year’s elections (unless he decides to bring them on earlier, while the opposition is weakened).

Kadima (Hebrew for Forward) has been the most recent party to try and fill up the gap between the left-leaning Labor and right-leaning Likud. The trend of capitalizing on the vast middle in Israel’s politics began back in 1977, when Labor, which had been ruling since the formation of the state, was finally defeated thanks to the emergence of the Dash (Hebrew acronym for Democratic Movement for Change) party.

Typically, every such attempt to form a coalition of centrist interest groups inevitably ended with a collapse of the “package” and with a re-opening of the appetizing vacuum at the center.

Kadima was established in the fall of 2005 by followers of then Premier Ariel Sharon, who realized he could not execute a planned, unilateral evacuation of thousands of Jewish settlers from the Gaza strip without moving to the left of his own party, Likud.

The Kadima vortex drew in a huge flow of politicians from the “moderate” right, including the former mayor of Jerusalem and top-rank Likud politician Ehud Olmert, who later became party chairman, following Ariel Sharon’s stroke.

Kadima scored the biggest success of a centrist party to date, picking up 29 of the 120 Knesset seats in the 2006 elections. But the illness of its founder and the entanglement of his successor in charges of corruption which are still being prosecuted in the courts, the qualuity of leadership in Kadima dwindled down. So much so, that the third party leader, Tzippi Livni, was unable to form a working coalition despite the fact that Kadima won the largest number of seats in the 2009 elections. Livni et al were outmaneuvered by Benjamin Netanyahu who formed the current government, and Kadima was demoted to the opposition.

 

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/kadima-holds-leadership-primary-amid-rumors-of-impending-split/2012/03/27/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: