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August 25, 2016 / 21 Av, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘ulpan’

In Hebrew: ‘Air Conditioner’

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

מַזְגָן I stayed once in a Paris hotel for a few days in July. It was sweltering hot, and there was no air conditioner in the room. When I inquired why, the hotel staff told that it only gets that hot a few days in the year, so there’s no real need.

In Israel, air conditioners are already blowing lots of cold air on those escaping from the heat (which I don’t mind so much).

The Hebrew term for air conditioner is מַזְגָן. Its root is מ.ז.ג meaning blending or merging – the air is blended inside the machine and blown out, also blendingconditioning the air in the room. So a מזגן is literally that which blends.

An example:

בְּתֵל אָבִיב, יֵשׁ אֲנָשִׁים שֶׁמְּבַלִּים אֶת כָּל הַקַּיִץ עִם הַמַּזְגָן. In Tel Aviv, there are people who spend the whole summer with the air conditioner. I don’t live in Tel Aviv, but if I did, I wouldn’t be one of those people.

You might also hear Israelis using the term מִזּוּג אֲוִיר. This means, literally,air conditioning, as מיזוגis the noun form of the active-intensive פִּעֵל verb, לְמַזֵּג– to blendto merge.

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Ami Steinberger

In Hebrew: ‘Environment’

Monday, May 6th, 2013

סְבִיבָה

With summer coming in the northern hemisphere and air-conditioning (entry on that tomorrow) set to full blast in Israeli homes and vehicles, this week’s a good time to introduce some Hebrew terms about climate and environment.

The Hebrew word for environment is סְבִיבָה. It’s a verbal noun of the root ס.ו.ב (s.w.b) meaning going around – the same root as that of the word for dreidelסְבִיבוֹן.

Some usages of סביבה:

הַמִּשְׂרָד לַהֲגָנַת הַסְּבִיבָה
Ministry for Environmental Protection (literally, for the protection of the environment)

צָרִיךְ לִדְאוֹג לַסְּבִיבָה הַיּוֹם לְעַמַן הַדּוֹר שֶׁל מָחָר.
We must take care of the environment today for the sake of tomorrow’s generation.

סְבִיבָה מִשְׂרָדִית נְעִימָה מְאַפְשֶׁרֶת עֲבוֹדָה פּוֹרָה.
A pleasant office environment enables productive work.

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Ami Steinberger

In Hebrew: ‘Behavior’

Sunday, May 5th, 2013

הִתְנַהֲגוּת To behave is to conduct oneself in a certain way. It is therefore not surprising that the Hebrew word for to behave comes from the Biblical root meaning conduct or drive נ.ה.ג (n.h.g).

To behave is לְהִתְנַהֵג (leh-heet-nah-HEG), a reflexive-intensive התפעל verb.

And following the verbal-noun pattern, behavior is הִתְנַהֲגוּת (heet-nah-hah-GOOT).

For example, הַהִתְנַהֲגוּת שֶׁל הַיָּלְדָה הִיא לֹא מְקֻבֶּלֶתthe girl’s behavior is unacceptable – (hah-heet-nah-hah-GOOT shel hah-yahl-DAH hee loh meh-koo-BEH-let).

Some other words of the same root are מִנְהָגcustom or tradition (meen-HAHG),לִנְהוֹגto drive (leen-HOHG) and לְהַנְהִיגto lead (leh-hahn-HEEG).

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Ami Steinberger

In Hebrew: ‘Return’

Friday, May 3rd, 2013

לַחְזוֹר, לָשׁוּב


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Ami Steinberger

In Hebrew: ‘Pride’

Thursday, May 2nd, 2013

גַּאֲוָה

Pride – what a contentious emotion. On the one hand, religions list it among the most grievous of sins or character traits. On the other hand, the gay community calls upon it as their staple state of being. But perhaps more accessible to most people is that swelling-up feeling inside, when we know we’ve done a good job, when someone speaks of our native country in a foreign land… or when someone we love is shining in the spotlight. The Hebrew word for pride is גַּאֲוָה, while proud is גֵּאֶה in the masculine and גֵּאָה in the feminine.

For example:

לִבִּי מִתְמַלֵּא בְּגַּאֲוָה כְּשֶׁאֲנִי רוֹאֶה דֶּגֶל כָּחוֹל לָבָן. My heart is filled with pride when I see a blue-and-white flag. and

הִיא גֵּאָה בַּבֵּן שֶׁלָּהּ. She’s proud of her son. To take pride is לְהִתְגָּאוֹת.
For example:

בַּמֶּה רָאוּי לְהִתְגָּאוֹת, וּבַמֶּה לֹּא?
What is worthy of taking pride in, and what not?
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Ami Steinberger

In Hebrew: ‘Justice’

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

צֶדֶק After yesterday’s fatal attack, one of the things on people’s minds in this part of the world is justiceצֶדֶק.

Here’s an example of צדק used in the context of a different series of events, from the summer of 2011:

הָעַם דּוֹרֵשׁ צֶדֶק חֶבְרָתִי! The people demand social justice! This three-letter word forms the root for other words such as the active-causative הִפְעִיל verb, לְהַצְדִיקto justify, the word for righteous personצַדִּיק in the masculine and צַדִּיקָהin the feminine – and the Hebrew equivalent for charityצְדָקָה (in Biblical Hebrewצדקה means righteousness), among others.

It’s also part of the name of an upscale neighborhood in Tel Aviv, נְוֵה צֶדֶק– literally, abode or home of justice. צדק is also the Hebrew name for the planet Jupiter.

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Ami Steinberger

In Hebrew: ‘Subconscious’

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

תַּת-מוּדָע

If מוּדָעוּת is awareness or consciousness, תַּת-מוּדָעis the subconscious or the unconscious. The particle -תַּת means sub- or under-, just as in English, in phrases like:

תַּת-יַמִּיunderwater
תַּת-מִיןsubspecies
תַּת-אָלוּףbrigadier general (subservient to the general)

An example of תת-מודע:

זִיגְמוֹנְד פְּרוֹיד פִּתֵּחַ אֶת הַמֻּשָּׂג שֶׁל הַתַּת-מוּדָע.
Sigmund Freud developed the concept of the unconscious.

Although, strictly speaking, the unconscious should be called תת-הַמודע, since תת-מודע is almost a single word on its own, it’s more appropriate to say הַתת-מודע.

Note that here unconscious refers to the psychological phenomenon, not the state of being unconscious of what’s going around around due to injury, etc. That is חֲסַר הַכָּרָה.

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Ami Steinberger

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/ktzat-ivrit/in-hebrew-subconscious/2013/04/30/

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