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September 16, 2014 / 21 Elul, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘ulpan’

In Hebrew: ‘Abstinence’

Friday, April 26th, 2013

הִתְנַזְּרוּת

פְּרִישׁוּת is a synonym not featured in the video.

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In Hebrew: ‘Sea Lion’

Thursday, April 25th, 2013

כֶּלֶב יָם If you’re up for a challenge and you like to read about animals, check out this Ynet article about Israeli wildlife photography. Warning – some pictures are not suitable for vegetarians.

The first animal depicted in the article is a leopard seal, the second-largest seal found around Antarctica.

A seal or sea lion in Hebrew is a כֶּלֶב יָם- literally, a dog of the sea.

A leopard seal is a כֶּלֶב יָם נְמֵרִי - literally, a leopard-like dog of the sea. (A נָמֵרis technically a leopard in Hebrew, but most Israelis use the term to refer to a tiger.)

For example:

בַּשַּׁיִט בְּאַנְטַרְקְטִיקָה הִיא רָאֲתָה כֶּלֶב יָם נְמֵרִי.
On the cruise in Antarctica, she saw a leopard seal.
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In Hebrew: ‘Addiction’

Wednesday, April 24th, 2013

הִתְמַכְּרוּת

Before I moved back to Israel in 2007 and opened up Ulpan La-Inyan a year later, I was training as a psychotherapist in Los Angeles. My first post was to Beit T’shuva, a Jewish center for addiction recovery on Venice Blvd.

The Hebrew word for addiction is הִתְמַכְּרוּת, of the root מ.כ.ר (m.k.r) meaning sale – since one sells him/herself, in a way, to the object of addiction.

In context:

בֵּית תְּשׁוּבָה הוּא מֶרְכַּז יְהוּדִי לִגְמִילָה מֵהִתְמַכְּרוּת.
Beit T’shuva (literally, House of Return) is a Jewish center for recovery (literally, weaning) from addiction.

התמכרות comes from the reflexive-intensive הִתְפַעֵל verb,לְהִתְמַכֵּר.

For example:

לֹא קָשֶׁה לְהִתְמַכֵּר לְעִשּׁוּן.
It’s not difficult to become addicted to smoking.

Someone addicted is מָכוּרif a male and מְכוּרָהif a female.

For example:

הִיא מְכוּרָה לְפֵייסְבּוּק.
She is addicted to Facebook.

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In Hebrew: ‘To Spend Money’

Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013

לְהוֹצִיא כֶּסֶף, לְבַזְבֵּז

Term 1: לְהוֹצִיא כֶּסֶף

A while ago I did an entry on expensesהוֹצָאוֹת. To spend money or to create an expense is לְהוֹצִיא כֶּסֶף - literally, to take out money.

For example:

הִיא חוֹשֶׁבֶת פַּעֲמַיִם לִפְנֵי שֶׁהִיא מוֹצִיאָה כֶּסֶף עַל מוֹתָרוֹת.
She thinks twice before spending money on luxuries.

להוציאis an active-causative הִפְעִיל verb.

Don’t confuse this term with the one for to withdraw money from an ATM (automated teller machine) – that’s לִמְשֹוֹךְ כֶּסֶף- literally, to pull money.

למשוךis an active-simple פָּעַל verb.

Term 2: לְבַזְבֵּז

Another way of saying to spend is לְבַזְבֵּז, though people usually use this term to mean to waste.

For example:

בְּנֵי הַנֹּעַר בִּזְבִּזוּ אַלְפֵי שְׁקָלִים שֶׁל הוֹרֵיהֶם בְּמַהֲלַךְ הַקַּיִץ.
The teens spent (wasted) thousands of shekels of their parents’ money over the summer.

לבזבז is an active-intensive פִּעֵל verb.

Likewise, the noun form of לבזבז is בִּזְבּוּז. Thus, a waste of money is בזבוז כסף, a waste of time is בזבוז זְמַן, etc.

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In Hebrew: ‘To Dial’

Monday, April 22nd, 2013

לְחַיֵּג As language develops, words sometimes depart from their original meaning to take on a similar but new meaning.

Take, for example, the English verb to dial meant something else to do with the word day in its original Latin, but today its main meaning is to press numbers on a keypad.

Likewise, the Hebrew word for to dial - לְחַיֵּג (leh-khah-YEG) – comes from the root ח.ו.ג (kh.w.g), which has to do with circles. This root appears in the children’s song, עוּגָה עוּגָה עוּגָה (OO-gah, OO-gah, OO-gah) - Cake, Cake, Cake, in the word נָחוּגָה (nah-KHOO-gah) - we shall go around (see a translation and transliteration as well as a video of the song).

What do circles have to do with dialing? You may recall the ancestor of the iPhone, the rotary phone, which had a round dial.

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In Hebrew: ‘Airshow’

Thursday, April 18th, 2013

מַטָּס If you were in Israel early yesterday afternoon, you probably heard and saw fighter jets flying overhead.

The makers of Modern Hebrew took the root ט.ו.ס - t.w.s – meaning flying and plugged it into a noun structure beginning with a מ (m), yielding the common word for airplane, מָטוֹס. It’s the same noun structure as that of מָקוֹם - place, which also comes from a root whose middle letter is ו (w) - ק.ו.מ (k.w.m).

To create the word for airshow, Hebrew plugs מטוס into another noun structure, with מַטָּס as the resulting word.

Note that the same word-change (morphological) process takes place to create the word for flotilla: Hebrew takes the word for oar or paddle - מָשׁוֹט, plugs it into that other noun structure, and מַשָּׁטis born.

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In Hebrew: ‘Bittersweet’

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

מָתוֹק-מָרִיר Though the mood was great yesterday here as the political nation of Israel celebrated 65 years of existence and prosperity, there’s a bittersweet element as well, as we remember the people of Boston who have experienced an event this week that we in Israel know all too well.

The Hebrew term for bittersweet combines the words for sweetמָתוֹק and bitter – מָרִיר- yielding מָתוֹק-מָרִיר.

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Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/ktzat-ivrit/in-hebrew-bittersweet/2013/04/17/

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