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December 8, 2016 / 8 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘unrest’

Pro-PA Groups Blame Israeli Counter-Terror Training for US Anti-Cop Protests

Tuesday, July 12th, 2016

Leaders of the “Black Lives Matter” grassroots organization in the United States are teaming up with pro-Palestinian Authority groups to blame Israel for perceived racial issues in the country.

The trend dates back in part to a simple statement made by Reverend Graylan Scott Hagler, senior minister of the Plymouth Congregational United Church of Christ in Washington DC, at a Students for Justice in Palestine gathering last November (2015) at the University of Maryland college campus in Baltimore, Maryland.

“The systems of oppression, they’re always very similar to each other,” he said. “They may be tweaked, they may be changed just a little bit, but we find out that the paradign is the same, it looks the same, it feels the same, it is the same.”

Hagler based his point on the concept of intersectionality; the ways various systems intersect and overlap. For his purposes, he described how various systems of oppression folded in various forms of discrimination interwoven between each other.

“We need to respect and honor the dignity of all people,” he told the gathering that day, according to an article by Anna Isaacs published in the March-April 2016 issue of Moment Magazine.

“Sisters and brothers, black lives matter. Palestinian lives matter.”

Pro-Palestinian Authority groups have increasingly been taking advantage of anti-police protests, especial those that turn into violent disturbances, as they sweep across the United States.

This week, they are claiming that “genocide” of African Americans is taking place as the result of the “inhuman treatment and genocide of Palestinians” by Israeli-trained American cops.

The NYU Students for Justice in Palestine organization this week posted an accusation linking Israeli counter-terror training of American police officers with the “genocide of black people in America.” The group said the Israelis are training U.S. police to use “the same murderous and racist tactics used by Israelis against Palestinians,” warning that American cops were being taught by their Israeli counterparts to “oppress” Black Americans.

In a subsequent statement on its Facebook page, the group issued a statement of clarification which, if anything, further reinforced the point.

The statement said, in part:

The IDF assists the NYPD and other American police departments in their oppression and murder of black people. These groups share a common logic that manifests in several types of oppression, white supremacist racism among them. If we in SJP and in the Palestine solidarity movement more generally are serious about ending Israeli oppression then we must stand with black americans. We need to be in the streets with them and we need to organize against police brutality. The Black struggle and the Palestinian struggle are not the same. Still, Palestinian liberation and Black liberation are linked. That is why Palestinians must be there for Black people, and Black People must be there for Palestinians. (sic) This sense of mutual responsibility has been present in our movements.

A group called the ‘Dream Defenders’ meanwhile is among the pro-Arab groups also heavily involved in trying to entangle America’s racial issues with the unrelated chaos in the Middle East. The group, associated with the grassroots Black Lives Matter organization, was founded by three young men.

One of the founders is Ahmad Abuznaid, described by CounterPunch.org by “born in East Jerusalem, Palestine” and who defines himself as a “Palestinian American social justice lawyer.”

Abuznaid, who says he is “all about justice,” moved to the U.S. when he was a year old with his parents, who both received their U.S. citizenship. The family lived in the country until Abuznaid was age seven; at that point they returned to the Palestinian Authority territories for a five-year stint.

Hana Levi Julian

Egyptian Jews: We support Military’s Fight against Terrorism

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

When Magda Haroun was out on the streets during the unrest now rocking Egypt’s capital, she saw someone standing over the body of a dead soldier.

“Not even a Jew would do this,” she heard him say.

Haroun, the president of the Egyptian Jewish community, doesn’t enjoy hearing anti-Semitic slurs on the street. She gets nervous when she hears Egyptians are burning the churches of Coptic Christians, a much larger religious minority than the country’s tiny Jewish community. She assumes that most of her compatriots have forgotten there are any Jews left in Egypt.

But when protesters filled Cairo’s Tahrir Square at the end of June calling on President Mohamed Morsi to step down, she was right there with them.

“The amount of people in Tahrir was breathtaking,” Haroun told JTA. “The unity between people was breathtaking. Some of the people recognized me because I was on TV. They were shaking my hand and telling me, ‘God bless you. You are a real Egyptian.’ ”

Haroun, 61, is the youngest of the 14 women who make up Cairo’s dwindling Jewish community. Most are now in their 80s, living off charity and rental income from properties the community has owned for generations.

But though small in number, Haroun says the community is proud of its country and, like many Egyptians, supportive of the army’s campaign to quell Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood.

The latest round of unrest in Egypt began last month after mass protests in Tahrir Square led the army to depose Morsi, the country’s first democratically elected leader, and install a new government. The Muslim Brotherhood denounced the move as a coup and confrontations raged between its supporters and the military, leaving more than 1,000 Egyptians dead in just the last week alone.

Jews have lived in Egypt for millennia. Around the time of Israel’s founding in 1948, the community was estimated to number 75,000, but in the decades that followed the vast majority fled.

Those that remain are happy to call Egypt home, Haroun says. Although she has relatives in several European countries, she vows to “never, never, never” leave.

“I’m very proud to be here,” she said. “I want to do whatever I can to help. We are a strong people. I am very happy now that people [are] in the street. Instead of talking about football, they are talking politics. There is more awareness about the importance of our country.”

On Tuesday, CNN reported that the White House was withholding some military aid to Egypt in protest of the military’s violent crackdown on Morsi supporters. But for Haroun, the army’s assertion of control is a welcome development she sees as “fighting terrorism.”

Haroun says the Jewish community thus far has not experienced any anti-Semitism as a result of the fighting — probably, she says, because it’s so small.

Under Morsi’s rule, however, it was a different story. Soon after taking office, the government voted to end a monthly subsidy of $1,000 to the Jewish community it had provided for more than 20 years.

“The way they wanted things to go, it’s a fascist movement,” she said. “I hope we’ll start a new era in Egypt where everyone will be equal regardless of political beliefs. I am very confident in the future.”

Another believer in a more tolerant Egyptian future is Levana Zamir, whose family was expelled from Cairo when she was 12. Now living in Tel Aviv, Zamir remembers an Egypt that strived to be open to the world.

“I’m very proud of Egyptians that they want to go back to the secularism and cosmopolitanism of Egypt,” said Zamir, the president of the Association of Jews from Egypt in Israel. “They need someone like [former President Anwar] Sadat, who wanted to open the Arab world.”

Haroun says that as much as the casual anti-Semitism she hears bothers her, she believes it comes from Egyptians’ unfamiliarity with Judaism.

“It’s all talking, there is no action,” she said. “The talk about anti-Semitism is ignorance. The Egyptians are loving. They love each other. It’s ignorance that pushes them to hate and to burn churches.”

Egypt’s unrest will prevent the community from celebrating Rosh Hashanah together in a few weeks. In past years, the community has hosted festive meals and invited foreign dignitaries and non-Jewish Egyptians.

JTA

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/egyptian-jews-we-support-militarys-fight-against-terrorism/2013/08/21/

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