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September 30, 2016 / 27 Elul, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘video’

Neo-Nazi Leaflets Hit Jews in Florida Neighborhood [video]

Monday, September 26th, 2016

Local families in Mandarin, a neighborhood of Jacksonville, Florida, woke up Sunday morning to discover hate-mongering neo-Nazi fliers on their doorsteps, specifically targeting Jews, News4JAX reported.

Local residents have contacted News4JAX after finding these fliers on their driveways Sunday, on the week before Rosh Hashanah, followed by Yom Kippur. Those same residents said this was not the first time they have faced such trash outside their homes.

One neighborhood family called police after discovering the flier, only to be told that police had already launched an investigation, after another neighbor called with a complaint about the same flier.

The flier, adorned with a swastika, identifies itself as coming from the National Socialist Movement headquartered in Detroit, Michigan.

That complaining family that spoke to the TV station is Jewish, and wishes to remain anonymous, but they want the authorities to send a message that these hateful fliers are unacceptable.

“It makes me mad,” said a family member. “It’s disgusting. For something like this to happen in 2016 at this point in time with everything going on. America was built on all types of people coming here, and for this to come up it’s disheartening.”

David Israel

New Israeli Crowdfunding Platform Starts Micro Funds Named After Donors [video]

Monday, September 26th, 2016

LivinGift, a new Israeli crowdfunding platform, www.LivinGift.org, has been launched a few days ago and is now raising donations for its first two social impact projects: a course training Haredi men and women seeking employment in finance, the other supporting the fair hiring of security guards and medics. The service offers donors an evergreen fund in their name, starting at $25. Donors may also launch a memorial fund or make it a gift.

The evergreen or endowment fund is made possible thanks to a unique mechanism to solve social problems: the donor chooses a social project which he or she are passionate about and donates. The social project receives the donation as a zero-interest loan. Once the social project starts repaying the loan, the donor can roll the donation for a new social project.

LivinGift’s Public Advisory Council is headed by Prof. Meir Heth, Israel’s former Banks Commissioner, Tel-Aviv Stock Exchange Chairman , Bank Leumi Chairman and Chairman of Teva Pharmaceuticals. The credit rating for ventures, will be performed by the international rating agency D&B.

Social impact enterprises seeking to get a loan from LivinGift will have to show a double impact strategy: social or environmental impact, alongside a sustainable and profitable economic model and a fixed income.

In addition, LivinGift is open for applications to all forms of organizations from around the globe: non-profits, NGOs, for-profit companies, and cooperatives. Registration is open to social impact enterprises from all sectors: health, education, animal protection, social impact technologies, environment, and support for disadvantaged populations.

Shiry Eden, LivinGift founder, said in a statement, “We believe that significant social problems can only be solved over time by organizations that have a sustainable economic model. In the long-term, our objective is to support the formation of a strong, stable and profitable fourth sector, which can be a positive influence on a range of social problems throughout the world.”

JNi.Media

‘Jerusalem 1000-1400: Every People Under Heaven’ at the Met [video]

Monday, September 26th, 2016

Between the year 1000 and 1400, roughly the time of the crusades (1095-1291), the city of Jerusalem became the most significant place in the known world, an object of desire to people from as faraway as Britain and even Scandinavia and Iceland to India. This universal preoccupation with Jerusalem, ushered a most creative period in the city’s history, the subject of a new exhibition opening Tuesday, Sept. 26, at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The exhibition, “Jerusalem 1000–1400: Every People Under Heaven” demonstrates the enormous influence of the city, sacred to the three monotheistic religions, on the art of that time.

“While Jerusalem is often described as a city of three faiths, that formulation underestimates its fascinating complexity,” says the exhibition’s web page. “In fact, the city was home to multiple cultures, faiths, and languages. History records harmonious and dissonant voices of people from many lands, passing in the narrow streets of a city not much larger than midtown Manhattan. This will be the first exhibition to unravel the various cultural traditions and aesthetic strands that enriched and enlivened the medieval city.”

More than 200 works of art have been gathered from some 60 lenders worldwide, with a quarter of the objects arriving from Jerusalem, including key loans from the city’s religious communities, some of which have never before shared their treasures outside their walls. “Jerusalem 1000–1400: Every People Under Heaven” bears witness to the crucial role that the city has played in shaping world culture, a lesson vital to our common history.

The following are notes from the museum’s website, accompanying the exhibition.

“Beginning in about the year 1000, Jerusalem captivated the world’s attention as never before. Why did it hold that focus for the next four centuries?

“A kind of Jerusalem fever gripped much of the world from about 1000 to 1400. Across three continents, thousands made their way to the Holy City—from Jewish, Christian, and Islamic traditions alike. Generals and their armies fought over it. Merchants profited from it. Patrons, artists, pilgrims, poets, and scholars drew inspiration from it. Focusing their attention on this singular spot, they praised its magic, endowed its sacred buildings, and created luxury goods for residents and visitors. As a result, the Holy City shaped the art of this period in significant ways.

“Dramatic circumstances, including natural disasters, political turmoil, intense religious fervor, and an uptick in world travel, brought new attention to the city. In the 1030s, the Fatimid caliph who ruled over Jerusalem forged an agreement with the Byzantine emperor to rebuild the Holy City after a series of earthquakes and the malfeasance of his predecessor. In 1099 European Christians achieved their improbable dream of conquering Jerusalem. In the wake of their bloody victory, they created glorious buildings and works of art for nearly a century. In 1187, the military leader Saladin (1137/38–1193) retook the city and rededicated its Islamic sanctuaries. In the late 1200s through the 1300s, Mamluk sultans blessed with stable reigns promoted the city as a spiritual and scholarly center.

“Throughout these years, the city was home to more cultures, faiths, and languages than ever before. As the site of both conflict and coexistence, it inspired art of great beauty and fascinating complexity.”

One of the exhibition’s many galleries is named “The Absent Temple.” It cites instructions from an early 11th century guidebook for Jewish pilgrims regarding a visit to the Temple Mount: “If you are worthy to go up to Jerusalem you should observe the following procedure: If you are riding on a donkey, step down; if you are on foot, take off your sandals, then rending your garment say: ‘This our sanctuary was destroyed.'”

But even with no Temple to visit, Jewish pilgrims flocked to medieval Jerusalem. They came to mourn the destruction of the Temple and pray that it would one day be rebuilt. Their prayers largely took place not within the city but around its walls. They made a circuit of the city’s gates—a custom that was revived after the liberation of Old Jerusalem in 1967—concluding at the eastern Gates of Mercy, built over an ancient gateway to the Temple. There they might scratch their names and prayers into the stone. They then ascended the Mount of Olives, the historic site where it is believed that the Divine Spirit will return at the time of Redemption. This significant spot east of the city afforded the best vantage point from which to gaze upon the Temple platform.

The installation features specially commissioned videos that provide subtle glimpses, as through windows, of the varied and colorful panorama of Jerusalem with its ever-present medieval monuments. Complementing the videos are short interviews with some of the fascinating men and women who maintain the city’s medieval legacy.

On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 899, September 26, 2016–January 8, 2017

JNi.Media

Conference Debating Bringing Holocaust Images to Life [video]

Sunday, September 25th, 2016

Films from the Holocaust period are filled with haunting images, providing a rare opportunity for researchers to piece together the stories of lives cut brutally short. In today’s digital age, such film footage is particularly compelling and stirring, granting us a glimpse into a living memory of a world that was – and is no longer. A groundbreaking conference on the subject, the European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI) workshop entitled “Holocaust Archival Footage as a Historical Source: Methodology and Ethics in the Digital Era,” is currently taking place at Yad Vashem in Jerusalem.

EHRI is a trans-national project aimed at supporting and promoting improved access to Holocaust documentation scattered across the globe. The workshop, designed especially for experts, convened some 30 top level professionals, providing tools and tips for researchers and historians from Austria, France, Germany, the Netherlands, the US and other countries in utilizing Holocaust-era footage as a historical source. Sessions included newly-discovered footage located at various archives and collections of Holocaust-related material; the unique challenges entailed in locating, collecting and restoring these rare films; and technical and methodological dilemmas of using of source movies.

One of the stories featured at the conference was about David Teitelbaum, an amateur photographer who was born in Wielopole Skrzyńskie, southeastern Poland, in 1891 and later relocated to the United States, where he became a successful businessman. Teitelbaum would return to his hometown almost every year to visit his family, and in 1938, he filmed his trip. In June or July 1939 he traveled to Wielopole again, but only stayed for a short time, sensing that war was imminent. Members of the Teitelbaum, Rappaport and Sartoria families, as well as their neighbors and acquaintances, were likely filmed during that last visit.

Several years ago, this rare color footage depicting Jewish life in the shtetl of Wielopole before the Holocaust was donated to Yad Vashem. With the assistance of relatives (particularly Channa Rachel Helen Glucksman, David Teitelbaum’s niece), Yad Vashem has succeeded in identifying many of the individuals in the film, including a number of sick or elderly Jews who were murdered in an aktion in the town.

Since the film was uploaded to Yad Vashem’s Youtube channel, it has been seen by over 130,000 viewers, many of whom have commented on how deeply moved they were to have caught a glimpse of Jewish life in the town before it was destroyed forever.

The Yad Vashem Archives house hundreds of Holocaust-related films, including raw footage, newsreels, amateur films, propaganda and feature films, and postwar trials. What makes this footage so unique is that it contains many layers of information beyond the recorded data – the personal backgrounds of the subjects, the historical context of the events depicted, and even the motivation and ideology of the photographer – all of which may be revealed through painstaking research.

Efrat Komisar, Head of the Film Footage Section at the Yad Vashem Archives and one of the presenters at the workshop, explained the importance of correct usage, critical research and cataloguing of film footage. “These wartime films have a complex nature, stemming, among other things, from the photographers’ intentions in creating the film in the first place. Nevertheless, they are invaluable as original documentation. The films open a window onto the world of their subjects, as well as that of their creators. They supplement information provided by other forms of documentation, as well as priceless visual testimony of people and places before, during and even immediately after the Shoah.

“Historians, researchers and filmmakers alike have an obligation to investigate these precious films thoroughly, and present them to the public together with the most comprehensive and accurate information possible, thus building a more accurate visual memory of the Holocaust,” Komisar continues. “Moving images provide something that other kinds of documentation – written, aural and even still photographs – cannot give: multisensory scenes of people, places and events that depict often very personal accounts in real-time. In a way, seeing them almost brings them back to life.”

JNi.Media

The Golem Comes to Life in Berlin’s Jewish Museum [video]

Sunday, September 25th, 2016

A golem (Heb: Shapeless lump) is a creature formed out of a dust or mud that’s brought to life by ritual incantations and sequences of Hebrew letters on a scroll dumped into its mouth. In Jewish lore, after it has been brought to life by a human creator, the golem becomes a helper, a companion, or a rescuer of an imperiled Jewish community. In many golem stories, as in the later Frankenstein tales, the creature runs amok and becomes a threat to its creator.

The myth of artificial life – from homunculi and cyborgs to robots and androids – is the focus of an extensive thematic exhibition about the golem at the Jewish Museum Berlin. This most prominent of Jewish legendary figures has inspired generations of artists and writers to this day.

“Our exhibition presents the golem from a variety of perspectives, from its inception in a Jewish mystical ritual to its role as a subject of popular storytelling in film and its afterlife in artistic and digital realms,” says a museum press release. “The golem symbolizes each era’s dreaded dangers and hopes for redemption. The exhibition uses the golem figure to examine topics like creativity, creation, power, and redemption.”

The exhibition demonstrates the thematic richness of the material, as is apparent from medieval manuscripts, many-layered narratives, and works of art from the last two hundred years. Whether in painting, sculpture, object art, video, installation art, photography, or illustration, the golem is very much alive and, with it, the question of what it means to be human.

The exhibition is being held at the Jewish Museum Berlin’s Old Building, level 1, Lindenstraße 9-14, 10969 Berlin, September 23,  2016 to January 29, 2017.

JNi.Media

Arab Preacher gets 8 Months for Inspiring Assassination Attempt on MK Glick [video]

Sunday, September 25th, 2016

The Jerusalem Magistrate Court on Sunday morning sentenced Sheikh Omar Abu Sara to eight months in prison for inciting to murdering Jews in sermons he gave on the Temple Mount. The complaint against Abu Sara was submitted two years ago by legal aid society Honenu attorney Hur Nizri, in the name of Yehuda Glick, now a Likud MK, shortly after an assassination attempt on Glick.

Honenu issued a statement expressing pleasure for the fact that Abu Sara was finally placed behind bars, but was critical of the short sentence. “This is a case of too little too late,” said the statement, adding, “We wonder why he received such a relatively light sentence despite the fact that his incitements have many followers and could have caused attacks against Jews — while a Jewish young man with hardly any influence, who was convicted of possessing a document that was never disseminated, was given two years in prison.”

Back in March, the Rehovot Mgaistrate Court sentenced Moshe Orbach, 24, a rightwing activist from B’nei B’rak, to two years in prison plus half a year probation, for writing a document titled “Wicked Kingdom,” intended for limited dissemination. The document was discovered during the investigation of the torching of a section of the Fish and Loaves church near the Kinneret. Judge Menahem Mizrahi wrote in his sentence that “the harsh character of the document, all of which is comprised of incitement to violence in its environment, has a destructive potential should it reach attentive ears and willing hearts seeking violence.” The judge added that the exceptionally harsh sentence should serve as a warning to anyone else wishing to follow in Orbach’s footsteps that the courts “will not belittle acts that have the power to damage or subvert the delicate fabric of Israel’s population.”

All of which appears to be targeted mostly at Jews, because an Arab preacher who actually advocated murdering the entire Jewish segment of said delicate fabric of the population received less than half of Orbach’s sentence — and he, the Arab, didn’t just scribble it on a mimeographed booklet, he proudly declared it on YouTube:

“The Jews are the most wicked among Allah’s creatures. They are the worst villains who have ever walked the planet. We’re living in a time when the war against the Jews is near, and I say clearly to the Jews: It’s time to slaughter you. It’s time to fight you. It’s time to kill you. God willing, we are ready. We and the loyal Muslims, along with the armies of the Muslim Caliphate who will come to liberate this land from your filth. We are anticipating the day — the moment — of your slaughter.”

Spoken like a true man of God.

JNi.Media

Man Shouting ‘Allahu Akbar’ Shot Outside Israel’s Embassy in Turkey [video]

Wednesday, September 21st, 2016

A man brandishing a knife and shouting “Allahu Akbar” was shot by police as he was storming the Israeli embassy in Ankara, Turkey Wednesday afternoon, an Israeli Foreign Ministry spokesman and Turkish police said in a statement. Turkish police told Reuters that the attacker shouted “Allahu Akbar” as he was rushing the embassy before being shot in the leg.

“The staff is safe,” said the statement, “The attacker was wounded before he reached the embassy. The assailant was shot and wounded by a local security man.”

The area outside the embassy was cordoned off and Police examined the bag the attacker was carrying and it either did not contain explosives, or the explosives were not activated, according to Reuters.

CNN’s Turkish channel reported the man had attempted to stab embassy personnel before being shot in the leg, and appeared mentally unstable. Turkish NTV reported two assailants had tried to storm the embassy.

David Israel

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/man-shouting-allahu-akbar-shot-outside-israels-embassy-in-turkey-video/2016/09/21/

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