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April 20, 2014 / 20 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Visit Ktzat Ivrit’

In Hebrew: ‘Wrapping paper’

Wednesday, December 5th, 2012

A good Hebrew term to know as the end of fall approaches is that for wrapping paper: נְיַר עֲטִיפָה.

נייר paper – first appears in the Hebrew language in Mishnaic literature, while עטיפה - wrapping – comes from the Biblical-Hebrew verb to wrap -לַעֲטוֹף .

For example: אֲבַקֵּשׁ לַעֲטוֹף אֶת הַמַּתָּנָה בְּנְיַר עֲטִיפָה. May I have the gift wrapped in wrapping paper? (literally, I shall ask to wrap the gift in wrapping paper.)

Truth is, in Biblical Hebrew, לעטוף also means to faint or to grow weak. More on that in tomorrow’s dose.

Visit Ktzat Ivrit.

How to Say: ‘Go Out of Your mind’

Tuesday, December 4th, 2012

The English expression to go out of one’s (his) mind gets translated literally into Modern Hebrew:

לָצֵאת מִדַּעְתּוֹ

לצאת  means to go out, while מדעתו  means from his mind. To use this expression, conjugate the verb לצאת, and substitute the וֹ-   ending with the one you wish to mean.

For example:

אִם הָרַעַשׁ כָּכָה יַמְשִׁיךְ, אֲנִי אֵצֵא מִדַּעְתִּי. If the noise continues this way, I’ll go out of my mind.

נִדְמֶה לִי שֶׁהִיא יָצְאָה מִדַּעְתָּהּ. It seems to me that she’s gone crazy.

A synonym for לצאת מדעתו is לְהִשְׁתַּגֵּעַ .

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Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/ktzat-ivrit/how-to-say-go-out-of-your-mind/2012/12/04/

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