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October 1, 2014 / 7 Tishri, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘voting’

Schumer, Silver, Nadler to Endorse Velázquez, Rebuffing Anti-Zionist Charges

Sunday, June 3rd, 2012

U.S. Senator Charles Schumer will joinNY Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver and Congressman Jerrold Nadler in endorsing Congresswoman Nydia Velázquez for re-election, today, Sunday, June 3rd, at 10:00 a.m. at the Roosevelt Hotel in Manhattan.

Getting the support of the top democratic leaders will boost Velázquez’ campaign. Getting the support of the three top Jewish politicians in New York state is not a bad thing either.

A court-imposed re-mapping of congressional voting districts in New York City has added a hefty part of the still-Jewish Lower East Side to Velázquez’ now Seventh District. The neighborhood used to be part of Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney’s district.

Indeed, the endorsements of the three “top Jews” are scheduled for an hour before the Israel Day Parade on Fifth Avenue today.

A source in the Democratic party told the NY Post that “having the three top Jewish Democrats in the state endorsing her certainly bolsters her credentials on Israel and within the Jewish community.”

Her major opponent, City Councilman Erik Martin Dilan, has called the 10-term incumbent Velázquez anti-Zionist.

In one of his campaign handouts, Dilan said that Velázquez had “the worst voting record on Israel in the New York congressional delegation.”

Dilan attacked Velazquez as one of the few members of Congress who refused to sign a 2010 letter calling on President Obama to impose sanctions on Iran to prevent it from developing nuclear weapons to be used against Israel.

The Velazquez camp told the NY Daily News that “suggesting the Congresswoman is anything but a friend, ally and supporter of Israel is politically driven nonsense.”

“She has been outspoken on issues ranging from holding Syria accountable for failing to support the peace process, condemning attacks by Hamas and Hezbollah on soldiers and civilians, furthering aid to Israel, calling on the U.N. to take to task the Iranian government for threats targeting Israel, and reaffirming the right of Israel to defend itself.”

Velazquez, Dilan, Dan O’Connor and George Martinez are on the ballot for the June 26 Democratic primary.

Jewish Press Radio with Yishai Fleisher: Votes to Make a Difference

Thursday, May 31st, 2012

(((CLICK BELOW TO HEAR AUDIO)))

Yishai is joined by Elie Pieprz, the national director of I Vote Israel, an organization dedicated to assisting American-born Jews residing in Israel with voting in American elections. Yishai and Pieperz talk about the goals of I Vote Israel and how overseas votes can really make a difference in election results. The segment wraps up with Yishai presenting a musical piece.

To download, right-click, and “Save Target As” HERE.

Rubin Reports: Western Civilization Faces the Big Test – Citizens! Heal Your Societies or Go Over the Cliff

Tuesday, May 8th, 2012

http://www.rubinreports.blogspot.com/2012/05/western-civilization-faces-big-test.html

The current political crisis in Europe, and in America as well, is not at all hard to understand. Think of it like this: society is not infinitely malleable. If you pull a rubber band far enough it is either going to snap back or it will break.

Western democracies have worked very well for 60 years now. They have been remarkably prosperous; remarkably peaceful. They defeated the Communist challenge. In a sense they—and I include the United States here—are victim of this very success.

Out of rational self-interest, the realities of electoral politics, and a strong sense—misguided or otherwise—the welfare state and the payment of entitlements have been expanding.

You can—as my grandmother used to say—throw around money like a drunken sailor until you run out of money.

The self-imposed burdens have reached, and exceeded, the limit of what these societies could finance. This problem has been highlighted, of course, by an economic recession but it is not the product of that business contraction.

Things have been made worse by the fact that most governments in power have tried to apply the very old policies that were making the societies ill in the first place. The situation is akin to the medical practice of centuries ago in which an already sickly patient was bled further by the application of leeches. Death often followed.

Those governments buried in the equivalent of “old-think” in the USSR have just three alternatives:

–Deny any of this is happening. Every penny spent is absolutely necessary to stop old people from starving, women from keeling over in their 30s, the globe from heating up like a tea kettle, and in short the mass extinction of the human race.

–Self-defense. Say that anyone who wants to recognize reality is a violent Nazi hater of women and a racist flat-earther.

–Use a scapegoat. If only taxes were raised on rich, greedy people then the party can go on uninterrupted.

Obviously, I’m being facetious but that when all the verbal foliage is cleared away that list is pretty accurate.

But what about those governments, or oppositions, that wanted to be responsible by limiting spending, reorganizing or reducing entitlements, and cutting their own payroll to a level that could be sustained?

Well, that’s an uphill battle as we’ve just seen in Greece. People don’t want to be told to sacrifice, especially because they suspect that the elite isn’t doing so and that this same elite is responsible for the mess. So they can be—easily?—manipulated into voting for those who tell them to eat, drink and be merry, with a minimal tax on billionaires and millionaires paying off the caterer.

If you can buy or import voting blocks to ensure your victory that also helps. Is any government in France from this moment on going to limit immigration, fight Islamism, cut back on vacations, and raise retirement ages and the length of the work week? That’s doubtful.

Now this is the very moment that democracy comes into play. It is in the hands of the voters to decide whether to face the music or default on paying the fiddler. Can they be made to understand in the face of a clueless mass media and a fantasy-intoxicated intellectual class what is at stake and what needs to be done? Ask again in November.

Something very important should also be made clear here: political stances and solutions are not historically permanent. I would argue that liberalism (and a dose of the social democrats) was the best solution for the West’s problems in 1900. But it is no longer 1900. Huge social reforms have been made; out-groups have been brought into the fold with equal rights. The balance has shifted and that reality must now be the starting point in facing reality.

Could it possibly be that a government that has grown steadily for so many decades might have become too big? Is it conceivable that regulations imposed by the thousands have become too onerous? Is it within the realm of the real world that the burden of salaries and retirements for those who draw government pay checks have become too onerous? Might it be true that if you keep dividing society into warring groups they will eventually go to war against each other?

Or is this all a fantasy of a reactionary, evil, woman-hating racist mindset that should be dismissed by any civilized being?

Democracy is based on the idea that the average citizen is wise enough to understand what his society and country must do to survive and to do better, or at least minimally well. We are now going to find out whether that proposition is accurate.

Assad: With a Ballot In One Hand, And A Gun In The Other

Sunday, February 26th, 2012

Over 100 Syrian civilians and soldiers were killed this past weekend, as the Assad regime and the international community independently stepped up efforts to resolve the crisis that has threatened to plunge the country into civil war.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said the Syrian military is continuing its bombardment of Homs, which has gone on uninterrupted for over three weeks. The human rights organization also reported intense skirmishes between Syrian troops and army defectors in Daraa, the southern province where the 11-month uprising originated. On Saturday alone, at least 85 people were reported killed.

Meanwhile, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) said Saturday that the negotiations it was brokering between the Assad regime and opposition groups yielded no breakthroughs. The ICRC is attempting to secure the agreement of both sides to enter Homs and evacuate those in need of medical assistance.

Against this backdrop of violence, the Assad regime held a referendum on a new constitution Sunday. Seen by most as a gesture to placate domestic and international fury, the proposed constitution would theoretically end the 30-plus year rule of the Assad family. The new constitution would omit the current article that declares the ruling Baath party the leader of state and society – effectively creating a multiparty system, and would limit presidential terms to two seven-year tenures.

Turnout is likely to be suspect, as the military continued to bombard opposition positions as voting stations opened across the country. In Homs and Daraa, foci of the most intense clashes and heaviest casualties, amateur video depicted people throwing ballots in the trash in protest. But voters in calmer regions like the capital of Damascus expressed excitement for the referendum, underscoring the support that Assad retains among swaths of Syrian society, as well as the great disparities that typify Syrian civil society.

Critics say that Assad’s ‘reforms’ are too little too late, and cite the fact that the proposed presidential term limit is not retroactive for proof that Assad has no intention of relinquishing power – having already served for 11 years, he would be eligible to serve another 14 years after his current term expires in 2014. The two main Syrian umbrella opposition groups – the Syrian National Council and the National Coordination Body for Democratic Change in Syria – urged citizens to boycott the referendum, while other groups called for a general strike.

German Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle responded to the referendum by reiterating the West’s unified opposition to Assad’s continued rule. “The referendum in Syria is nothing more than a farce. Sham votes cannot be a contribution to a resolution of the crisis. Assad must finally end the violence and clear the way for a political transition.”

Westerwelle’s comments follow the inaugural meeting of the ‘Friends of Syria’ that took place this past weekend. Attended by US, European, Turkish, and Arab League diplomats, the two-day conference in Tunisia sought to establish a coherent and coordinated strategy on alleviating the plight of the Syrian people, supporting the opposition, and removing Assad from power. The alliance discussed plans to deploy a civilian peacekeeping force after Assad’s departure, but the Western nations again deferred on the issue of military intervention.

Acre’s Arab Council Members Vote to Cut Soldiers’ Free Train Rides

Sunday, February 19th, 2012

MyNet reports today that following the decision by Israel Railways Authority to cut Sunday morning free rides for soldiers (who return to their bases en masse at that time), Acre Mayor Shimon Lankry proposed purchasing tickets for the city’s soldiers on active duty. The result was a vote that exposed a new rift in Jewish-Arab relations in this mixed city.

The proposal split the body almost perfectly along ethnic lines, with most Jewish council members voting for it, and all the Arab members voting against.

Even Deputy Mayor Adham Jamal. who is both an Arab and a member of the Mayor’s ruling coalition, voted against his boss’s idea, arguing that it was nothing more than political posturing.

“The mayor did it to get headlines in order to get the votes of the soldiers and their parents,” he told MyNet.

Jewish businessman and city council member Shlomo Fedida also voted against the mayor’s proposal, arguing there was a safety reason behind the Railways Authority’s decision to cut down on the number of soldiers it transports Sunday mornings.

A Post-Primary Message

Friday, February 10th, 2012

Before we wrap up the primary campaign, I wish to express a heartfelt thanks to all of my supporters. To push the faith-based alternative uphill, over long years and against all odds, is a task that I could never have done alone. You, the supporters, who see the vision and destiny in front of your eyes, are always ready and willing to make sacrifices to deal with the difficult and sometimes gloomy reality. You are the secret of our success.

You, who took a day off from work to drive voters throughout the country to the polls; you, who stood in the cold and rain for hours and insisted on voting despite all the tricks and shticks employed to prevent you from doing so; you, who spent hours calling voters from your private phones to convince them to vote for me; you, who spent the entire day at the polls persuading voters, observing the vote and trying to deal with all the voting shenanigans that took place; you, who donated your hard-earned money to help our campaign – I am grateful to all of you. You and all of our supporters are the pioneers leading the way, bearing the message of the faith-based revolution and the great hope for the nation of Israel and its state.

Our position is far better at the end of this election campaign than it was before the election. To sum up the election, we crossed the “Green Line” in a big way.

In absolute numbers, we doubled our vote total from the last election. Three- quarters of the votes we received this time were from cities and towns throughout Israel. The faith-based alternative has become part and parcel of the national camp. It has made its way to the fore, fighting to be recognized. One quarter of the Likud (without taking into account the election fraud that is unfortunately becoming apparent) is already there. This is the most momentous achievement of this election.

Despite very difficult opening conditions that no other person in the Likud dared take on, we ran a focused, ideological campaign. Thank God, we have emerged strengthened and full of positive energies.

For the first time, we ran against a very strong incumbent prime minister. We had to deal with a totally obedient cabinet that stood behind him at all the rallies and in their media dealings. We ran despite the fact that not one person from the entire Knesset faction dared to step out of line and support me. We ran against colossal financial support on behalf of Prime Minister Netanyahu and a never-ending stream of text messages to the voters from Netanyahu, Minister Yuli Edelstein (in Russian) and the Likud’s executive director – while we had a budget permitting us to send only one text message. We ran against a party machine that activated a well-oiled mechanism of mayors and Likud branches. And we ran against a barrage of threats. Despite all these obstacles, every fourth Likud member in Bat Yam, Holon and Yavne came forward and voted for me.

As more and more proof of voting fraud comes to light, we can safely say that it is very likely that the actual number of votes we received is significantly higher. But that is not the point. We must understand that just as the land of Israel was acquired through suffering, so will be the leadership of Israel. In this way, though, it is acquired for eternity.

The way ahead for us is still long, treacherous and complex. There are important lessons for us to learn, changes that need to be made, and a new approach that we must adopt in the Likud. But there are three things that must be done immediately: Sign up new members for the Likud, make any necessary changes in your Likud membership, and, most important, ride the wave of the hearts that have been opened in this campaign and connect to your local Likud branch. This is the most authentic and honest way to make your mark. Learn from our supporters in Petach Tikva, Rosh Ha’ayin, Netanya, Haifa, Jerusalem, Bnei Brak, Beit Shemesh and throughout the country. In every place where these connections were made, we had tremendous election results.

Connection is the true secret. It is the name of the game. When we authentically connect with our fellow Jews, nobody can separate us from the faith and true will of the majority of the Israeli public.

May we merit the ability to perfect the world in the Kingdom of Heaven.

Netanyahu Wins Big Over Feiglin in Likud Primary

Wednesday, February 1st, 2012

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu declared victory over Jewish Leadership faction head and long-time activist Moshe Feiglin Tuesday night, after winning 75% of votes for leader of the Likud party.

“Today the real Likud won,” Netanyahu told supporters in Tel Aviv. “We proved that our strength is our unity.  We will continue to lead with responsibility for better education, economy, and security for all citizens of the State of Israel.”  He also said general elections will not take place for some time.

Just half of Likud’s 130,000 eligible voters came out to vote for Likud party leader and for new members of the Central Committee.  Despite what was considered a low showing – due to inclement weather and some voting station complications – it was a 10 percent higher turnout than during the last primary in 2007.

Though Feiglin’s loss was by a large majority, he did gain a couple of percentage points on Netanyahu since the last primary vote.  In 2007 he earned 23.4% while on Tuesday he earned 25%.

“I think we can be proud of our percentage in these primaries,” International Director of the Jewish Leadership faction Shmuel Sackett told The Jewish Press.  “we need to remember that Moshe’s opponent was a sitting prime minister whereas three years ago, that same opponent was just a regular member of Knesset. To increase one’s percentage against such odds is actually an incredible feat.”

He raised concern, however, that his supporters were purposefully thwarted in the voting.  Some polling stations in Judea and Samaria – Feiglin’s stronghold – were reported to have opened two hours late due to the eligible voters list going missing.  Approximately an hour before polling stations were scheduled to close, the Likud announced that voting would be extended for another hour until 11pm, to give members a final opportunity to vote.  A spokesman also reported that Feiglin representatives were illegally restricted from being present during vote counting.

A Likud spokesman said voting location problems occurred outside Judea and Samaria as well, in places where Netanyahu was believed to have a greater advantage.

Some voters protested Prime Minister Netanyahu’s policies in Judea and Samaria by boycotting the vote.

Feiglin expressed satisfaction with the results, saying: “More than one quarter of registered Likud members voted for me and for a Jewish state.” “All politicians and Israeli media people were surprised by the results,” Sackett said.  “We plan on growing stronger from here.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/netanyahu-wins-big-over-feiglin-in-likud-primary/2012/02/01/

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