web analytics
December 4, 2016 / 4 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Watch’

Watch: IDF Soldiers Afraid To Use Their Weapons Against Knife Wielding Zombie [video]

Wednesday, July 6th, 2016

On Tuesday a knife wielding female Arab terrorist approached a hitchhiking post at the Gitai Avisar junction in Samaria, an incident that ended in her death. However, the enclosed dashboard camera record of the incident reveals a troubling fact about the encounter: throughout the incident, it is painfully obvious that the two armed IDF soldiers are afraid to shoot the attacker.

They are afraid – but they are not afraid of the terrorist.  They are afraid to use their weapon against her and they do everything to avoid having to pull the trigger.

It takes the two soldiers a full 10 seconds, during which they keep retreating from the knife waving attacker, ordering her back as she continues to advance zombie fashion, until they are forced to shoot her.

Then, as the attacker, who is very much alive, continues to writhe in pain on the ground, the soldiers fail to eliminate her, exposing themselves to the real danger of being blown up by an explosive device she could be carrying, or if she got up again with her knife as the Bezeq terrorist did. There is even a point in the video where the two soldiers simultaneously look behind them, losing line of sight with the still-moving terrorist.

If ever there were proof of the damage that the IDF leadership has inflicted on the ability of the soldiers on the ground to defend themselves effectively against crazed terrorist attackers — this one should be played round-the-clock at IDF headquarters. This is a video of soldiers plagued by the fear of being prosecuted for their righteous actions and a fear of being forced to use their weapon against a dangerous terrorist who has clearly stepped beyond the rational realm.

The action begins around 0:20.

David Israel

Haifa U Study: Educators Should Watch for High-Functioning Autistic Children with Handwriting Difficulties

Thursday, May 26th, 2016

The handwriting performance of children with high-functioning autism differs from that of children without autism. Accordingly, the education system should consider the types and formats of tasks given to these children when they are integrated in regular schools. This conclusion emerges from a new study undertaken at the University of Haifa. “The typical process of handwriting performance among children with high-functioning autism is unique, but while the education system addresses reading skills, it pays almost no attention to handwriting skills,” explains Prof. Sara Rosenblum, the author of the study.

Children with high-functioning autism experience difficulties in the social, sensory, and movement fields, but differ from other children on the autism spectrum in terms of their linguistic and cognitive development. Among other differences, these children are usually integrated in regular schools where they are required to perform routine activities such as reading and writing. Writing tasks play an important part in academic progress: writing-related activities account for 30-60 percent of daily activity time in schools. Despite this, the education system places a strong emphasis on reading, whereas skills development, monitoring, and assistance in handwriting performance are much less frequent. There is also a lack of teacher training in this important area.

The present study is unique and the first of its kind in the world. The study was undertaken as part of the thesis prepared by Hemda Amit Ben Simhon of the Neuro-developmental Center at Maccabi HMO, supervised by Prof. Rosenblum, and in consultation with Dr. Eynat Gal, an autism specialist, both from the Department of Occupational Therapy at the University of Haifa. The study included 60 children aged 9-12 from the 3rd through 6th grades at various schools. Half the subjects were children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder with IQs above 80, while the other half were children with normal development. The children were asked to complete three writing tasks: writing the first name and family name; copying a paragraph; and writing a story describing a picture that was shown to them.

The writing tasks were completed using a special system developed by Prof. Rosenblum that provides objective, computerized data relating not only to the rhythm and speed of handwriting, but also to the degree of pressure applied on the page by the writer, the length of time the pen is in the air, the degree of slant of the pen during handwriting, and so on.

The study findings show that in 91.5 percent of the instances the objective indicators provided by the computerized system enabled the identification of children with high-functioning autism as distinct from children with normal development. In other words, the handwriting performances of the two groups showed statistically significant differences. The children with high-functioning autism produced taller and broader letters; waiting times on paper and in the air were longer; and the degree of slant of the pen was smaller.

It also emerged that the differences between the children with high-functioning autism and those with normal development were particularly prominent in the copying task, and less so in the free writing task. The text copying task required significantly more time. The researchers suggest that the need to invest a long period of time in the handwriting task may exacerbate fatigue, impair concentration, and even hamper the ability to produce handwritten content. This investment in the handwriting task may come at the expense of availability for other academic tasks the children receive, as well as their availability for social challenges in the classroom. “When a child has difficulty writing, they effectively have to cope with this difficulty over many hours a day, making it harder for them to cope with the additional challenges they face (social, cognitive, and functional). For example, if a child has to stay behind in recess to copy text from the board, they will have less time to practice social skills,” the researchers explained.

JNi.Media

Big ‘Nakba’ Protest in TAU this Sunday, Watch this Space for Updates

Friday, May 13th, 2016

This Sunday, May 15, at 11:00 AM, at Tel-Aviv University’s Antin Square, the annual Nakba (Catastrophe) commemoration ceremony will be held by the TAU Arab/Radical-Left students. Our friends at Im Tirtzu will be holding a “Nakba Charta” (Nakba Nonsense) counter protest and will update our website during and after the protest.

Nakba Day is commemorated on May 15, Israel’s declaration of independence day in 1948. The Jewish State, which follows the Jewish calendar for its “bank holidays,” celebrated the day on the 5th of Iyar (although this year, out of respect for Shabbat, we celebrated it on Thursday, Iyar 4). For the Arabs, it is an annual day of commemoration of the first day when their bad move at the UN Nov. 1947 partition vote blew in their faces, resulting in their succession of losses in their attempt to destroy the Jewish state—although they keep on trying.

It should be noted that as long as Israelis were determined to hold on to their right to settle anywhere in the Land of Israel, commemoration of the Nakba was being practiced by very few Arab citizens of Israel. The memories of 1948 were largely personal and communal, without a driving political component. But in the wake of the 1991 Madrid Conference, the first time Israel acquiesced to the concept of “Palestinian independence,” the observance of the Nakba has grown stronger and often violent. The Oslo Accords, which signaled that Israel was ready to capitulate on the fate of the liberated regions of Gaza, Judea, Samaria and the Golan, helped turn the Nakba craze into a regular day of confrontation between Arab Israeli youths and police, reminding many Israelis of the Arab pogroms of the 1920s and ’30s.

On Nakba Day 2011, egged on by the “Arab Spring,” Arabs from Judea and Samaria, the Gaza Strip, Lebanon and Syria marched towards the 1949 armistice (green line) borders, to mark their continued rejection of the right of the Jewish State to exist. At least twelve Arabs were killed and hundreds were wounded when the IDF blocked the zombie-fashion advance on the border fences by thousands of Syrian protesters who tried to forcibly enter the Golan Heights. Arabs also threw stones at Israeli soldiers guarding checkpoints in eastern Jerusalem, and the soldiers fired rubber bullets and tear gas in response.

A 2011 law empowers the Israeli finance minister to cut or reduce government funding to any NGO that organizes Nakba commemoration events.

David Israel

Watch full Version: Knesset ‘Songs in their Memory’ Event Honoring Israel’s Fallen [video]

Wednesday, May 11th, 2016

On Tuesday, the eve of the Day of Remembrance for the Fallen Soldiers of Israel and Victims of Terrorism, the Knesset held the “Songs in their Memory” event in the presence of President Reven Rivlin, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and hundreds of members of bereaved families.

Knesset Speaker Yuli Edelstein, Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon, Welfare Minister Haim Katz, Deputy IDF Chief of Staff Maj. Gen. Yair Golan and Israel Police Commissioner Roni Alsheich recited poems.

Israeli dignitaries at the memorial wall to the IDF fallen / Photo credit: Itzik Harari, Knesset Public Relations Division

Israeli dignitaries at the memorial wall to the IDF fallen / Photo credit: Itzik Harari, Knesset Public Relations Division

The ceremony also featured performances by Shiri Meimon, Ninet Tayeb, Harel Skaat, Idan Haviv, Chief IDF Cantor Lt. Col. Shai Abramson, Uziya Tzadok and military bands.

The main national event on the eve of the Day of Remembrance was a joint initiative of the Knesset, Ministry of Defense’s Families and Commemoration Department and the National Insurance Institute’s Division for Terror Victims.

During the event, the stories of the following fallen soldiers and terror victims were told:

Yair Engel and Matan Polivoda, the Shayetet 13 soldiers who were killed in a diving accident;

Ben Vanunu, who was killed in Operation Protective Edge;

Abie Moses, who lost his wife and son and suffered severe burns during a terror attack near Alfei Menashe;

Lt. Col. Daniel Shipenbauer, the pilot who was awarded a citation for an operation in August 2006 and was killed in the helicopter crash in Romania;

Dafna Meir, who was stabbed to death in front of her teenage daughter inside their home in Otniel;

Border Police Cpl. Hadar Cohen, who was murdered during a terror attack at Damascus Gate outside of Jerusalem’s Old City after preventing the death of a fellow officer.

JNi.Media

Shiloh Musings: Holocaust Memorial Day, When Even Mourners May Watch TV in Israel

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

One of the big adjustments for me as a mourner of a parent, a status that lasts a Jewish Year, is that I’m not permitted to watch my usual entertainment on the television, or my favorite movies–mostly old musicals– on DVD. I’ve been listening to a lot of shiurim, Torah and Tanach (Bible) classes from the computer, mostly Matan where I study, and I have no problem with newscasts.

In Israel there are two days a year when all the television programs suit the restrictions of mourners. As according to Jewish Tradition, the day begins at night, so last night on the Eve of Holocaust Memorial Day there were all sorts of television shows about the Holocaust, survivors etc. One I found particularly annoying and political; it was on Israel’s Chanel 1. Their news editors do their best to turn even the weather into complaints about the government, and they had an “expose`” of sorts emphasizing the difficulties many elderly “survivors” have financially and how some sort of fall between the bureaucratic cracks, because they don’t fit the clerical and/or legal definition of “survivor.”  They may have been too young or escaped too early or stayed in Europe too long to get German reparations which helped so many people financially. And now they are decades past retirement age, and like many elderly, have serious financial problems which they hope the Israeli Government can solve.  I changed channels.

I caught another program with interviews and films of survivors returning to their “former homes/countries” where they had suffered. There was also a Holocaust movie with Daniel Craig that I watched a bit until they had a crazy scene that meshed together Jewish wedding music and a battle.

Everyday fewer and fewer survivors, witnesses to the atrocities of the Nazis and too many others remain alive and/or capable of telling their tales. Yad Vashem and the Steven Spielberg Film and Video Archive are rushing to film and tape everyone who can possibly tell a first person tale of the Holocaust and survival. A friend of mine and her siblings recently accompanied their father back to Europe on a trip filmed by one of these groups.

The Holocaust was a very black and evil time in World History, and we shouldn’t forget that it happened in advanced and cultured Europe. That’s a message we must take to heart, and that is why I consider the terrible anti-Israel/antisemitic rhetoric coming out of even the most respected, academic and “open/Liberal” universities all over the world so troubling. The distortions in their thinking, teaching and ideologies are even more dangerous than  Hitler’s rantings and Mein Kampf.

I see myself as a realist, a pragmatist. Do you agree?

Batya Medad

Jewish Human Rights Watch Suing 3 Councils in High Court over BDS

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

Jewish Human Rights Watch (JHRW) has taken Swansea, Gwyneedd and Leicester councils to the High Court in London, alleging their boycott of Israeli goods is anti-Semitic and violates the 2010 Equality Act.

The group noted on their Facebook page: “We’re in the #‎HighCourt today and tomorrow about The Labour Party’s Leicester City Council & City and County of Swansea & Gwynedd Council’s #‎Antisemitic #‎Boycott motions. We’ll keep you updated as soon as we hear anything.”

Several local councils across the UK voted to boycott Israeli goods after 2009, when Israel refused to embrace the Hamas’ need to shoot rockets at its civilian population.

In 2010, Swansea council was seeking contracts with Veolia, a company connected to a project building a light railway in eastern Jerusalem. But then a motion was put before the council stating the project “not only contravenes UN demands but is in contravention of international law,” since the UN “has demanded that Israeli settlement activities and occupation should not be supported.”

Several council members called on the council to not do business with “any company in breach of international law or UN obligations or demands, so long as to do so would not be in breach of any relevant legislation.” The motion was approved.

Andrew Sharland, an attorney for Leicester’s council, which in 2014 approved a similar boycott of Israeli goods, said the JHRW is trying to “stifle criticisms of Israel.”

“What this challenge really concerns is criticism of the State of Israel, and the claimant’s desire to suppress it,” he said.

Following the 2014 vote, JHRW issued a statement saying, “Leicester City Council has taken steps down an anti-Semitic path under the guise of helping community relations in Leicester. Frankly this amounts to a get-of-out-town order to Leicester Jews.”

In 2014, Gwynedd council also passed a motion calling for a trade embargo against Israel, condemning the “attacks by the Israeli state on the territory of the Palestinians living in the Gaza Strip.” Just to make sure they did not come across as anti-Semites, Gwynedd council added, “It must be made clear that the proposal condemned the Israeli state and not the Jewish religion.”

The British government earlier this year issued guidelines for public authorities which say these boycotts are “inappropriate” without formal legal sanctions or embargoes by the national government. In fact, the Cabinet Office has said these boycotts “undermine good community relations, poison and polarize debate, weaken integration and fuel anti-Semitism.”

But Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn, whose party has been ridding itself of an industrial-size stash of anti-Semitic members in recent days, criticized the government’s warning against BDS as an “attack on local democracy.”

David Israel

Excellent Work Plan

Friday, August 23rd, 2013

Some Palestinian speaker detailing his view on negotiations over “Palestine,” and meanwhile offers a very good and reliable plan for Israel to deal with his kind. Just change the name to “Israel” and act accordingly, the situation would be resolved in under a day.

As a good friend of mine pit it, once you place yourself outside the law, you cannot continue to receive protection from the same law. This is a superb example of this axiom.

Last night, after someone in Lebanon shot four Katyusha rockets at Naharia, I expected a couple of IAF wings to get over to South Lebanon and return a large swath of land to the 12th century. Instead, we saw a proportionate response, an attack on some target south of Beirut which killed no one and didn’t even damage property.

We need to appoint this Palestinian man as our prime minister and follow whatever he says – except apply it to the enemy. Trust me, we will be immeasurably successful.

Oh – and watch the two Neturei Karta guys with the anti-Zionist sign. Do they recognize a pogrom in the making? I wonder.


Yori Yanover

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/multimedia/video-picks/excellent-work-plan/2013/08/23/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: