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September 24, 2016 / 21 Elul, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘website’

Guggenheim Museum Website Calls Israel “Racist,” Falsely Claims it Censors Art

Thursday, May 26th, 2016

{Originally posted to the Elder of Ziyon website}

The famous Guggenheim Museum in New York has a blog that says it “tells the Guggenheim’s evolving story, and offers insights on visual culture, urbanism, and the global art world, along with regular discoveries from the archives.”

It recently posted this outrageous piece by Chen Tamir, called “Censorship in Israel:

Over the past two years, the arts in Israel have been increasingly threatened by censorship and draconian government funding proposals. Some see this as the beginning of a culture war not unlike the one endured by the United States during the 1990s, when politicians used arts funding reform as a political tool to curry favor with conservative constituents. Freedom of speech is not treated with the same reverence in Israel as it is in the States; the country was not founded on a constitution that privileges such liberty. (Indeed, there is no Israeli constitution, a fact that some would consider a root cause of its racist and lopsided legal system and civic infrastructure.) The state of stagnation and worsening division in Israel/Palestine further entrenches the occupation, allowing more settlements to be built and inflicting further oppression on Palestinians. The metanarrative in Israel is one of continuous existential fear and victimization, which leads to the increased justification of insularity and nationalism, and the silencing of opposition.

Tamir includes many half-truths and absurd exaggerations as well as a complete disregard for the definition of “censorship.”

The calls for and instances of censorship over the past two years have been both top-down (from government officials) and grassroots (by private citizens calling for the removal of artworks). Some individuals have taken matters into their own hands and established paramilitary organizations that spy on human rights activists and organizations, most notably the extra-political group Im Tirtzu, which recently published a blacklist of “moles”—cultural producers of all stripes who support leftist organizations that they perceive as anti-Zionist.

Im Tirtzu is paramilitary?

And why is art that defames a nation free speech, but compiling a list of people behind that art is “censorship?”

Here’s another example of “censorship”:

Artist-choreographer Arkadi Zaides was criticized for a video and dance work incorporating footage from B’Tselem’s Camera Project (through which cameras are given to Palestinians to document conflicts with the army and neighboring settlers). The Museum of Petach Tikva, which presented the work, was asked by the municipality to close the exhibition early following pressure from a “concerned citizen,” while the Ministry of Culture withdrew its funding from the show (although the exhibition remained open until its scheduled end date a few days after this incident).

So, not a single person was deprived of seeing the show. How is that censorship?

Further examples include the redirection of arts funding to things like the Zionist Art Prize, and right-wing Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, acting as temporary Minister of Education, vetoing the 2015 candidate for the Ministry’s annual literature prize.

That is not censorship either.

Minister of Education Naftali Bennett and Minister of Culture and Sport Miri Regev have been responsible for a string of incidents of or attempts at censorship, ranging from the banning of books and plays to a withdrawal of state funding from Jaffa’s Elmina Theater unless its director, Norman Issa, reversed his refusal to perform in a settlement in the West Bank. Regev, who previously served as the chief censor of the Israeli army, recently treated the director of the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Suzanne Landau (herself recently accused of self-censorship) to a surprise Friday-night phone call to ask about a work of art in a recent exhibition by Uri Katzenstein.

The only thing in this list that is actual censorship is the supposed “banning of books and plays.” Curiously, Tamir doesn’t mention their names, but almost certainly he is referring to the Education Ministry taking an anti-Israel novel off of its reading list as “banning,” which it isn’t. Almost certainly there has been no banning of any play as well.

It takes a while before we find out how Tamir defines “censorship”:  the refusal of a nation to fund art that directly attacks it.

Herein lies the crux of contemporary censorship: funding. As in the American Culture Wars, public funding is being manipulated to become a mechanism of censorship.

That is not censorship by any definition. Making it somewhat more difficult for an artist to make a living from public money is not censorship. I can make art if I want, but if the Guggenheim decides not to make an exhibition of my artwork and the government doesn’t fund me I am not being “censored.” If publishers aren’t interested in my poetry and the BBC refuses to air my play and MTV doesn’t want to air my music videos, I am not being “censored.”

The entire article is a string of lies that simply misuses the meaning of the word “censorship” to falsely paint Israel as a racist society.

The Guggenheim Museum should remove this article. Not because I support censorship – I emphatically do not – but because I do not believe that the museum should publish lies, fabrications and slander. Tamir has the full right to post her lies on her own website and the Guggenheim has the full right to reject publishing a litany of her lies and half-truths.

If supporters of the Guggenheim decide to withhold their funding to show their displeasure for the museum becoming a mouthpiece for anti-Israel propaganda, that isn’t censorship either.

Elder of Ziyon

Facelift for Mossad Intelligence Agency Website

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

The Institute for Intelligence and Special Operations (Israel’s Mossad international intelligence agency) has launched a new website to recruit new candidates.

The agency is looking for potentially qualified people to fill positions it does not usually publicize, including intelligence, cyber technology and other spots within the agency.

Both men and women are encouraged to apply for various roles. Mossad director Tamir Pardo said following the launch of the site, “We must continue to recruit the highest quality people so that the Mossad might continue to lead, defend and allow for the continued existence of the State of Israel. The Mossad’s qualitative human capital is the secret of our success. The Mossad will continue to operate wherever and whenever necessary in order to defend the security of the State of Israel.”

 

 

Hana Levi Julian

Israel Has Been Rocket Free For…

Friday, August 1st, 2014

If your curious as to how long Israel has been rocket free, go visit: Israel Has Been Rocket Free For…. It will also display properly there.

Read more about “IsraelHasBeenRocketFree” at http://digitalhighrise.com/

Jewish Press News Briefs

The Guardian Invents Israeli Airstrike on Gaza Rally

Monday, December 10th, 2012

The Guardian published a post on Dec. 8 which contained 19 photos taken in Gaza on the day the Islamist terror group ‘celebrated’ their 25th anniversary: Khaled Meshaal attends Hamas anniversary rally in Gaza – in pictures. 

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Here’s one of the photos they included, taken by Reuters photographer Mohammed Salam.

Members of Hamas security forces stand guard

Here’s the caption:

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According to the caption, the building in the photo was destroyed by an Israeli strike during the Dec. 8 rally.

However, there have been no Israeli air strikes in Gaza since the ceasefire between Israel and Hamas went into effect on Nov. 21.

There have been a few violent border incidents and Gaza fishermen were arrested by the Israeli Navy on Nov. 28, but there have been no reports of airstrikes on Dec. 8, or on any day after the ceasefire – even on the website of Hamas.

Even the most minimal fact checking would have disproven the “witness” claim.

Please consider emailing Guardian readers’ editor Chris Elliott to seek a correction.

reader@guardian.co.uk.

Visit Cifwatch.com.

Adam Levick

Spruce Up Your Website for the Holidays

Monday, December 3rd, 2012

Changing your website to reflect upcoming holidays, commemorations or celebrations is an easy, fun, inexpensive and engaging way to keep your site timely and give it a little personality. Adding whimsical graphics to your logo or a holiday banner at the top of your site can be an attractive accent that gets your visitors into the holiday spirit.

You don’t have to only commemorate recognized holidays. Your founder’s birthday or your company’s launch date anniversary are perfectly legitimate reasons to use a banner to commemorate the occasion. Be sure to give your graphic designer some latitude for this project. And if the reason behind the swapped out logo is to obscure, make sure your users can see the explanation in the tool tip popup when they mouse over the image (it’s good for SEO, too).

You can use the graphic to cross-market holiday or seasonal specials. You can use it as the starting point for a site-wide promotional treasure hunt, or as a link to a special video or social media contest. Use your imagination.

Since most of the Jewish holidays don’t allow the use of computers, it’s a good idea to put your logos on display before the actual holiday. A few days to a week should be enough.

One of the more complicated holiday logos I ever created was for Yideoz, a now-defunct online Jewish video site. Each night of Chanukah, a new candle that flickered appeared, and when you moused over the logo, it played a song.

The most complicated issue your programmer should have to deal with is that Jewish holidays follow the Hebrew calendar. You have to make sure that Hebrew calendar dates for holidays, such as Chanukah (25th of Kislev) and Purim (14th of Adar 1 or 2) are converted to the proper English date. Thankfully, there are simple methods to do this. In PHP, the jewishtojd() and jdtojewish() functions convert back and forth from Hebrew calendar dates to English dates. [Java has a considerably more complicated method, probably because one of it’s founders wasn’t Israeli.] Your programmer should be able to preset the logos or banners so that there is no need to remember to swap them every time.

Have some fun brainstorming some seasonal and commemorative tweaks to your website. Chag sameach!

 

Marc Gottlieb

The Hezi Family – Formerly Of Moshav Gadid; Now Of Ein Tzurim Caravilla Site

Sunday, December 2nd, 2012

The family: Carol & Shmuel Hezi and their six children, Asnat, Eitan, Amichai, Vardit, Harel and Maital

Background: I, Carol, was born in the States and grew up in Canada. I always assumed I would live in Israel one day. My second visit to Israel was as a university student – I planned on studying there for a year – then I met Shmuel, a native Israeli, and we got married. I completed my degree in Israel, and we began looking for a permanent home. We moved to Gush Katif when our oldest daughter was one year old. We lived in Kfar Darom with ten other families while our moshav, Gadid, was being built.

The house was tiny and the water in the taps was not drinkable–not dangerous, just not potable, so we used the tap water for washing and we always had a big pot of drinking water sitting on the kitchen counter. My mother-in-law wasn’t happy that we had to carry water into the house like she had done in Yemen, but I looked at it as my chance to live like a pioneer for a few months. The “few months” stretched into two years…

Our second child, a son, was born in Kfar Darom. Shmuel was a farmer; he grew flowers, tomatoes, and peppers for export, and later, bug-free lettuce and greens for the local market. He also worked as an agricultural advisor for one of the companies specializing in bug-free produce. When we first moved to Gadid, it was all sand, no roads or paths to walk on, just sand. Our four younger children were born in Gadid. The community was like an extended family. I never had to warn my children not to talk to strangers–instead I had to explain what a stranger was, because they had never met any.

Our house – then: We eventually added on to the house in Gadid. It wasn’t fancy but it was large, and usually full–my parents came on extended visits, Shumel’s family and friends from around the country came as well.

Our eldest daughter married and she and her husband rented a house in Gadid (one of the houses built by Ariel Sharon) in what became the “young neighborhood.” Their first child was born there and my daughter was nine months pregnant with her second child when the soldiers came to take her from her home.

The family’s home in Moshav Gadid

Day of uprooting from Gadid: Our two eldest boys doing their army service – they were sent home for a couple of weeks to be with the family. Luckily, their units were stationed elsewhere and were not involved in the expulsion. Still, it was very hard for them.

Our house – now: We were in hotels for 10 months. Now we live in a “caravilla,” a cardboard house that is well on its way to falling completely apart while we finish building the new house. It’s also very crowded when all the kids are home. Our daughter (who now has four children) could not get a caravilla here–they are at another site–so when they come for Shabbat, there are wall-to-wall people…

What we left behind: The community in which we had lived for 26 years. The trees that were finally tall enough to build a tree house in, the garden with fruit trees (one of my sons brought a laundry basket full of unripe mangos to his hotel room), the greenhouses, our livelihood, the sand dunes, the sea, the Beit Knesset – basically our whole way of life.

Feelings toward the State: Betrayal. We were, after all, encouraged by the State to move to Gadid in the first place.

The biggest difficulty: Economics. We finally have land again, but my husband and I are really too old to start rebuilding greenhouses and be farmers again. That’s for the young and healthy. Nor do we have the financial means to invest and rebuild.

Have you built a house? We are in the process of building a house now. This is not something I thought I would have to do again. It was more fun the first time.

Jewish Press Staff

Hamshushalayim 2012 Theme: ‘Humor’

Friday, November 30th, 2012

Hamshushalayim is the central cultural festival of the winter season in Israel that attracts tens of thousands of visitors each year and offers a unique combination of hundreds of quality cultural events coupled with tourist and culinary attractions, all concentrated into four fun packed weekends during December. Thanks to a sweeping collaboration of Jerusalem’s cultural institutions, tourist centers and culinary venues, the festival-goers of Hamshushalayim are invited to spend the weekends enjoying the city till the late hours of the night.

The central theme of Hamshushalayim 2012 is ‘Humor’ – for your enjoyment in the capital, the festival will feature shows of Israeli, Jewish, Yerushalmi, bible and international humor, stand-up comedians, satire, story telling and jokesters, comedies, cabaret, humorist literature and poetry, humor in art, pantomime comics, laugh yoga, and funny theatrical tours for all the family.

Israel’s finest artist, producers and comedians will descent on Jerusalem to entertain and make you laugh: Gavri and Uri Banai on Humor in the Jerusalem theatre, Dan Almagor exploring the origins of Yerushalmi humor in a series of seminars at the YMCA. Yossi Alfy with Yerushalmi laughter stories. Caricaturist Michel Kichka in the Tower of David. A mad stand-up marathon at The Incubator Theatre. Classic comedy performances at the Khan Theatre. Movie laughter mayhem at the Cinematheque, humor in literature and poetry at Agnon House. Special shows for children at the Train Theatre, and much more.

Visit their website.

Jewish Press Staff

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/photos/hamshushalayim-2012-theme-humor/2012/11/30/

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