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September 3, 2014 / 8 Elul, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘website’

The Guardian Invents Israeli Airstrike on Gaza Rally

Monday, December 10th, 2012

The Guardian published a post on Dec. 8 which contained 19 photos taken in Gaza on the day the Islamist terror group ‘celebrated’ their 25th anniversary: Khaled Meshaal attends Hamas anniversary rally in Gaza – in pictures. 

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Here’s one of the photos they included, taken by Reuters photographer Mohammed Salam.

Members of Hamas security forces stand guard

Here’s the caption:

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According to the caption, the building in the photo was destroyed by an Israeli strike during the Dec. 8 rally.

However, there have been no Israeli air strikes in Gaza since the ceasefire between Israel and Hamas went into effect on Nov. 21.

There have been a few violent border incidents and Gaza fishermen were arrested by the Israeli Navy on Nov. 28, but there have been no reports of airstrikes on Dec. 8, or on any day after the ceasefire - even on the website of Hamas.

Even the most minimal fact checking would have disproven the “witness” claim.

Please consider emailing Guardian readers’ editor Chris Elliott to seek a correction.

reader@guardian.co.uk.

Visit Cifwatch.com.

Spruce Up Your Website for the Holidays

Monday, December 3rd, 2012

Changing your website to reflect upcoming holidays, commemorations or celebrations is an easy, fun, inexpensive and engaging way to keep your site timely and give it a little personality. Adding whimsical graphics to your logo or a holiday banner at the top of your site can be an attractive accent that gets your visitors into the holiday spirit.

You don’t have to only commemorate recognized holidays. Your founder’s birthday or your company’s launch date anniversary are perfectly legitimate reasons to use a banner to commemorate the occasion. Be sure to give your graphic designer some latitude for this project. And if the reason behind the swapped out logo is to obscure, make sure your users can see the explanation in the tool tip popup when they mouse over the image (it’s good for SEO, too).

You can use the graphic to cross-market holiday or seasonal specials. You can use it as the starting point for a site-wide promotional treasure hunt, or as a link to a special video or social media contest. Use your imagination.

Since most of the Jewish holidays don’t allow the use of computers, it’s a good idea to put your logos on display before the actual holiday. A few days to a week should be enough.

One of the more complicated holiday logos I ever created was for Yideoz, a now-defunct online Jewish video site. Each night of Chanukah, a new candle that flickered appeared, and when you moused over the logo, it played a song.

The most complicated issue your programmer should have to deal with is that Jewish holidays follow the Hebrew calendar. You have to make sure that Hebrew calendar dates for holidays, such as Chanukah (25th of Kislev) and Purim (14th of Adar 1 or 2) are converted to the proper English date. Thankfully, there are simple methods to do this. In PHP, the jewishtojd() and jdtojewish() functions convert back and forth from Hebrew calendar dates to English dates. [Java has a considerably more complicated method, probably because one of it's founders wasn't Israeli.] Your programmer should be able to preset the logos or banners so that there is no need to remember to swap them every time.

Have some fun brainstorming some seasonal and commemorative tweaks to your website. Chag sameach!

 

The Hezi Family – Formerly Of Moshav Gadid; Now Of Ein Tzurim Caravilla Site

Sunday, December 2nd, 2012

The family: Carol & Shmuel Hezi and their six children, Asnat, Eitan, Amichai, Vardit, Harel and Maital

Background: I, Carol, was born in the States and grew up in Canada. I always assumed I would live in Israel one day. My second visit to Israel was as a university student – I planned on studying there for a year – then I met Shmuel, a native Israeli, and we got married. I completed my degree in Israel, and we began looking for a permanent home. We moved to Gush Katif when our oldest daughter was one year old. We lived in Kfar Darom with ten other families while our moshav, Gadid, was being built.

The house was tiny and the water in the taps was not drinkable–not dangerous, just not potable, so we used the tap water for washing and we always had a big pot of drinking water sitting on the kitchen counter. My mother-in-law wasn’t happy that we had to carry water into the house like she had done in Yemen, but I looked at it as my chance to live like a pioneer for a few months. The “few months” stretched into two years…

Our second child, a son, was born in Kfar Darom. Shmuel was a farmer; he grew flowers, tomatoes, and peppers for export, and later, bug-free lettuce and greens for the local market. He also worked as an agricultural advisor for one of the companies specializing in bug-free produce. When we first moved to Gadid, it was all sand, no roads or paths to walk on, just sand. Our four younger children were born in Gadid. The community was like an extended family. I never had to warn my children not to talk to strangers–instead I had to explain what a stranger was, because they had never met any.

Our house – then: We eventually added on to the house in Gadid. It wasn’t fancy but it was large, and usually full–my parents came on extended visits, Shumel’s family and friends from around the country came as well.

Our eldest daughter married and she and her husband rented a house in Gadid (one of the houses built by Ariel Sharon) in what became the “young neighborhood.” Their first child was born there and my daughter was nine months pregnant with her second child when the soldiers came to take her from her home.

The family’s home in Moshav Gadid

Day of uprooting from Gadid: Our two eldest boys doing their army service – they were sent home for a couple of weeks to be with the family. Luckily, their units were stationed elsewhere and were not involved in the expulsion. Still, it was very hard for them.

Our house – now: We were in hotels for 10 months. Now we live in a “caravilla,” a cardboard house that is well on its way to falling completely apart while we finish building the new house. It’s also very crowded when all the kids are home. Our daughter (who now has four children) could not get a caravilla here–they are at another site–so when they come for Shabbat, there are wall-to-wall people…

What we left behind: The community in which we had lived for 26 years. The trees that were finally tall enough to build a tree house in, the garden with fruit trees (one of my sons brought a laundry basket full of unripe mangos to his hotel room), the greenhouses, our livelihood, the sand dunes, the sea, the Beit Knesset – basically our whole way of life.

Feelings toward the State: Betrayal. We were, after all, encouraged by the State to move to Gadid in the first place.

The biggest difficulty: Economics. We finally have land again, but my husband and I are really too old to start rebuilding greenhouses and be farmers again. That’s for the young and healthy. Nor do we have the financial means to invest and rebuild.

Have you built a house? We are in the process of building a house now. This is not something I thought I would have to do again. It was more fun the first time.

Hamshushalayim 2012 Theme: ‘Humor’

Friday, November 30th, 2012

Hamshushalayim is the central cultural festival of the winter season in Israel that attracts tens of thousands of visitors each year and offers a unique combination of hundreds of quality cultural events coupled with tourist and culinary attractions, all concentrated into four fun packed weekends during December. Thanks to a sweeping collaboration of Jerusalem’s cultural institutions, tourist centers and culinary venues, the festival-goers of Hamshushalayim are invited to spend the weekends enjoying the city till the late hours of the night.

The central theme of Hamshushalayim 2012 is ‘Humor’ – for your enjoyment in the capital, the festival will feature shows of Israeli, Jewish, Yerushalmi, bible and international humor, stand-up comedians, satire, story telling and jokesters, comedies, cabaret, humorist literature and poetry, humor in art, pantomime comics, laugh yoga, and funny theatrical tours for all the family.

Israel’s finest artist, producers and comedians will descent on Jerusalem to entertain and make you laugh: Gavri and Uri Banai on Humor in the Jerusalem theatre, Dan Almagor exploring the origins of Yerushalmi humor in a series of seminars at the YMCA. Yossi Alfy with Yerushalmi laughter stories. Caricaturist Michel Kichka in the Tower of David. A mad stand-up marathon at The Incubator Theatre. Classic comedy performances at the Khan Theatre. Movie laughter mayhem at the Cinematheque, humor in literature and poetry at Agnon House. Special shows for children at the Train Theatre, and much more.

Visit their website.

From Rockets to Roses

Thursday, November 29th, 2012

Look at the amazing, amazing things created by this artist – Rockets into roses….my greatest wish is that he soon runs out of base material from which to create his amazing art and that he never be supplied with more.

Look at this website to see what beauty can be shaped when love and art is stronger than hate and destruction:  http://rocketsintoroses.com/

I hope you’ll buy something to support this – but even if you don’t – just going there to see what beauty he has created is one way to show support. I hope one day soon to buy something myself…they aren’t cheap…but God, they touch my heart.

Visit A Soldier’s Mother.

Yeshivish, the Language

Monday, November 26th, 2012

One of my personal pleasures these days is listening to an Iyun Kal (“lightly in depth”) Shiur on Shas Illuminated. This is a website designed for people who learn Daf Yomi and want t go into a bit more depth on the subject matter discussed in that day’s Gemarah. I have promoted this website a couple of times since my own son is one of the Magidei Shiur (lecturers). He did the first Perek (chapter) in Shabbos and is due to do the 12th Perek. Having it ‘spoon fed’ to me daily is quite a treat.

I love listening what various Rishonim, Achronim, and modern day Poskim have say on the those Sugyos (topics). I get quite a bit out of someone else’s hard work researching those sources.

But I wonder how many people are able to understand the language spoken by some of the Magidei Shiur. One might ask, “Don’t they give those Shiurim in English?” The answer is, sort of. The language they use is something called Yeshivish. That is a combination of English, Hebrew, Yiddish, and Aramaic.

For most people who have attended a Yeshiva through high school and beyond – this is not a problem. This is the way most of us have learned Torah. We use this “Language of Learning”. It is in our blood. Using words like “Mutar and “Assur” are far more natural for us than using their English translations of “permitted” and “forbidden”. It is far more comfortable for us to use the language of the Talmud itself in certain words and expressions.

In fact this is one of the problems I have with ArtScroll English Shas. They translate too much. But I am not criticizing them for that. I actually applaud them for it. They should use as pristine a version of the English language as possible so that everyone can study the Talmud despite their backgrounds.

So what’s my problem? It is the following. If one becomes accustomed to using Yeshivish instead of English one may actually come to forget how to speak the language. Not everyone will be able to understand them. In some cases the Yeshivish becomes so ingrained and so extreme that they become completely incomprehensible to the untrained ear. They may not even realize that normal English speaking non Yeshivishe people have no clue what they are saying.

I will never forget a Sheva Brachos I attended one time. The Chasan’s older brother who was born and raised in America but had been learning in a Yeshiva for over a decade after he was married was asked to speak. He realized that not everyone in the room understood Yeshivish and said so.

He therefore said that he was going to say his D’var Torah in English. And he proceeded to speak incomprehensible Yeshivish anyway. Makes me wonder what his actual Yeshivish sounded like. The point is, however, that he actually thought he was speaking English!

This is a tremendous failing in the right wing Yeshiva world. Secular studies are denigrated so much that the ability to communicate with the non Yeshiva world is completely hampered. These students are either never taught or they completely ignore English grammar and never try to increase their vocabulary.

I don’t think I am alone in noting that this is a problem. I believe that many even right wing Roshei Yeshiva believe it is a problem. I recall reading that Rav Avreimal Ausband, the Rosh HaYeshiva of Telshe Yeshiva of Riverdale saying he felt this way. And yet I don’t believe that any Roshei Yeshiva are doing anything about it.

If the right wing wants to communicate their ideas to an educated Orthodox public, speaking or writing in Yeshivish will not do the trick. They should be able to put together complete sentences that do not contain Yeshivishe words.

Nor will they be able to even teach Torah to anyone who has not gone through the Yeshiva system. Which brings me back to The Magedei Shiur at Shas Illuminated. They are all Tamidei Chachmim, Talmudic scholars. But not all of them speak English – even though they think they are.

My son does. In his Shiurim on that website, he utilizes the vocabulary and English grammar he learned in high school and college. Although he also uses some Yeshivishe words, they are only the ones that are most commonly used. His Shiurim are therefore more broadly understood. But some of the other Magidei Shiur use a Yeshivishe jargon that only those with a serious Yeshivishe background will understand.

‘Likudnik’ Website Hacked by Palestinians

Sunday, November 18th, 2012

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The Likudnik website (www.likudnik.co.il) was hacked by a Palestinian hacking group called “Network Hackers Palestine” on Sunday.

The site is black and for a split second upon loading a picture of a Palestinian girl wearing a kefiyah in the Arab  colors green, red, and white can be seen.

Likudnik considers itself the “unofficial” website of the Likud and is read by party activists. Members of Knesset and new candidates for the Knesset pay premium rates during election season to rent advertising space on the front page.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/likudnik-website-hacked-by-palestinians/2012/11/18/

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