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August 29, 2016 / 25 Av, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘West Coast’

More Competition for Israel’s El Al Airlines

Thursday, May 26th, 2016

Israel’s national airline is about to have more competition on its Tel Aviv-United States route. United Airlines announced Thursday that it will increase the frequency of its flights between Tel Aviv and San Francisco.

Currently United flies the route three times a week; but on October 8, the airline plans to launch daily flights on Boeing 787 Dreamliners.

The new daily Tel Aviv – San Francisco route is bound to attract numerous business commuters and dual citizen immigrants. These passengers often find themselves forced to land in New York and then continue their journey onward with a second flight to the West Coast.

United Airlines Israel managing director Avi Friedman told Globes business news, “The decision to add flights on the San Francisco route was a response to strong demand for the route among consumers during the few months since it was launched.”

Hana Levi Julian

TCLA GRADUATION

Thursday, August 9th, 2012

Touro College Los Angeles (TCLA), the West Coast’s only WASC-accredited Orthodox Jewish college, recently celebrated its sixth annual commencement ceremony.

Seventeen graduates received degrees before over 150 guests. The keynote speaker, Dr. Mark Hasten, chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Touro College and University system, spoke about the value of education and the Touro College system’s history. TCLA’s dean, Dr. Esther Lowy, also spoke at the commencement.

Touro College Los Angeles annual commencement graduates.

Among the graduating class of 2012, outstanding students were recognized for scholastic achievement and service to the community. Valedictorian Miriam Brummer encouraged her fellow graduates to utilize their degrees to achieve their future goals and, most important, to hold onto Touro College’s value system. “Stay true to the values and ethics we have gained the past few years, and stay true to yourself,” Brummer said. Rochel Pollak was the salutatorian, while Avram Saada and Leah Mizrahi were recognized for their devotion to the Jewish community at large and the Touro community in particular. TCLA graduates seeking advanced degrees are proceeding to such prestigious universities as Columbia, USC and Pepperdine. Others will be working in their fields of interest.

TCLA is part of the Touro worldwide non-profit institutions of higher and professional education. The college is currently developing concentrations in health sciences and early education. For more information about TCLA, please call 323-822-9700 x 85155 or e-mail tourola.admissions@touro.edu.

Jeanne Litvin

On the West Coast, Coping with Israel Detractors

Thursday, June 28th, 2012

Visit http://israelcampusbeat.org for the latest Israel trends and events on campus.

As they look back at the recently completed academic year, many campus Israel activists can point to examples of apartheid walls and walkouts, but these instances do little to ruffle their optimism. As they look ahead to the upcoming academic year, they focus on improving the campus Israel environment and building a stronger community commitment to peace and coexistence.

While most pro-Israel students have encountered some degree of tense or uncomfortable opposition on their campuses, they do not let these obstacles deter them from their goal of improving the campus Israel environment.

Portland State University student Josh Aherns and others affiliated with Christians United for Israel (CUFI) waged an uphill battle in response to an anti-Israel message advanced by rap group DAM at a local Portland public high school early in the school year. DAM’s performance at the school was promoted by an Arabic studies professor and the school principal. In May, CUFI hosted an event that drew more protesters than people who actually were interested in the program.

“A good portion of our audience was people who did not agree with our message and showed up to demonstrate against us,” Aherns acknowledged.

The message they were protesting was hardly radical: The organizers sought to encourage open dialogue.

“While they didn’t stay for the whole lecture, we were able to explain to them that we weren’t what DAM was saying about us,” Aherns said, adding that the walkout did not signify a total failure “While the group walked out, some individuals stayed for the entire event and accepted our invitation to dialogue.”

The experience in Oregon is replicated elsewhere around the country on a regular basis. Faced with walkouts, protests at events and blatant anti-Israel and anti-Jewish rhetoric, campus Israel leaders work towards a more peaceful, brighter future as they plan for the next academic year.

UCLA sophomore Avinoam Baral envisions an exciting future for Bruins for Israel (BFI), which he said hopes to enhance its campus presence next year.

The group hopes to facilitate more positive and reciprocal conversation between pro-Israel students and Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) members. With little cooperation from UCLA’s SJP chapter, BFI members anticipate that they will enjoy success by maintaining the relationships that were built throughout the last academic year and cultivating new ones.

Focusing on the positive isn’t always easy, especially in light of some major tensions that BFI encountered on campus during the spring quarter. Baral pointed to one example, in which SJP members led a walkout that disrupted a BFI event.

“The walkout was a very unfortunate move, ” he said.” It could have been managed better [by both sides].”

Like many other Israel activists on campuses across the country who face similar challenges, Baral and Ahrens were not deterred by the obstacles they encountered last year. Rather, these occurrences inspired them to redouble their efforts in the year ahead. Baral said that BFI hopes to capitalize on the students they already have interested or seeking more information on pro-Israel activism by keeping up enthusiasm and education “to build a pro-Israel community that is not only a large community with a lot of members but is educated, well informed and can effectively advocate and support Israel.”

Aherns and other CUFI on Campus members at Portland State hope to build a more open and respectful environment in spite of the hostility they have encountered on campus.

“It was stressful, but very encouraging to students who had felt too intimidated to speak up for Israel on campus,” Aherns said in reference to last year’s events. “We strengthened our relationships and resolve, and were able to demonstrate to the community and students who weren’t sure what to think about Israel and CUFI that our group was able to be respectful and positive, even in a hostile environment.”

Rachel Henderson, Israel Campus Beat

OU West Coast Convention

Wednesday, January 4th, 2012

Orthodox Union Executive Vice President Rabbi Steven Weil at the West Coast launching of the OU Press’s Koren Mesorat HaRav Siddur at the recent OU convention in Los Angeles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rabbi Hershel Schachter of Yeshiva University answering a question by Jewish Press West Coast Editor Jeanne Litvin at the recent OU convention in Los Angeles.

 

 

Jeanne Litvin

Manischewitz Promises A Passover With Tam Tams

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

SAN FRANCISCO – They’re baaack. Duly chastened by the Great Tam Tam Crisis of spring ’08, the Manischewitz Company went into overdrive and will have plenty of the crunchy six-sided unleavened crackers available this Passover season.

    “Absolutely,” declared the company’s former CEO Bruce Bossidy last November.

Bossidy joined the country’s first and still largest matzah-making concern in January 2008 and spent much of the year bringing in new management and getting the new matzah production line up and running at the company’s year-old, $15 million facility in Newark, N.J.

But the clock ran down and early last year, Bossidy was forced to cancel Tam Tams for the first time in 68 years.

The outcry was immediate; Jewish consumers coast to coast mourned the absence of the beloved cracker. Stories ran not only in the Jewish media but The New York Times and New York Daily News, and on NPR. The blogosphere exploded with anger. A black market sprang up, with one Michigan rabbi offering three boxes of the previous year’s crackers on eBay; bidding started at $10.

This April, however, there will be more than enough to go around. All flavors of Passover Tam Tam crackers will be available except for Tiny Tams, which were not made because of complications with the die cut used to create them. Bossidy also promised a sufficient amount of Passover matzah; last year saw shortages of the unleavened holiday bread in the Northeast and along the West Coast during the eight-day holiday.

While Manischewitz makes an array of kosher products, it was founded in 1888 as the country’s first commercial matzah bakery and matzah remains central to its mission.

Like most kosher food manufacturers, Manischewitz’s busiest season is Passover. Fifty percent of its business involves kosher-for-Passover food, particularly matzah, which is an extremely labor-intensive product.

As one of two sacramental foods required at the seder table, along with wine, production is carefully controlled to ensure that water only comes into contact with the flour for less than 18 minutes. Longer than that and, according to rabbinic authorities, leavening begins.

In industrial production, a mashgiach, or kosher supervisor, must watch the flour from the time the wheat is milled until water is introduced to the flour during the mixing process. At that point the dough is given even closer supervision to make sure it is completely baked in less than 18 minutes.

Manischewitz begins making Passover matzah immediately after Labor Day and its manufacture continued until late February. During the five-month season, up to 20 mashgichim work on the product. This year for the first time the factory is using only kosher-for-Passover flour year-round, even for its daily matzah. Although the flour is more expensive to produce, it costs the company much less than shutting down the entire plant for four or five weeks every summer for re-kashering. Now the annual kashering takes about a week.

During the height of the Passover production season, one or two truckloads of flour arrive at the Manischewitz plant every day, about 500,000 pounds a week.

Nearly 76 million sheets of matzah are produced each year, enough to circle the globe if one wanted to waste perfectly good matzah in such a foolhardy way.  (JTA)

Sue Fishkoff

The Hardest Three Words to Say

Wednesday, October 29th, 2008

You and your spouse are driving along the highway. You begin to strongly suspect that you have missed your exit. The thought keeps nagging at you, and as more time elapses and the terrain is looking less and less familiar, the more certain you become. Yet as you begin to vociferously demand that your husband turn off the next exit, he stubbornly insists that you are headed in the right direction.

Fifteen minutes have passed. By now you both realize that you are driving on the wrong route. Yet instead of changing paths, your spouse is still hoping beyond hope that this will somehow bring you to your intended destination.

Why is he being so obstinate? Because turning around is admitting that he has made a mistake – and that’s probably the hardest thing for any human being to do.

We all have that highway scenario played out in our lives. We understand that we’re heading down the wrong path and we realize that the longer we continue, the more lost we will become. And yet we obstinately cling to our mistaken ways.

Why? Because it is so incredibly hard to admit that we’ve make a mistake.

You’ve had a disagreement with your spouse, child or coworker. It escalated to the point of ugly comments and incriminating remarks.

You know you were wrong. You know you crossed some red lines. You realize that you should never have brought his mother into the conversation, or that hapless remark he once said (and apologized for dozens of times) more than 10 years ago.

And yet you couldn’t stop yourself. As soon as you began your slippery slide into that nasty terrain of discord, there was no way to prevent plunging full force.

Now the heated moment is behind you. You know you ought to make amends, but every time it occurs to you to apologize, every fiber of your being rebels as your mind begins a full-scale line of defense. You may have been wrong, but he did say/do/act so inconsiderately. Thus, he should be apologizing!

Why remain in a bitter tug of war that is straining your relationship and distancing you further, when an apology could easily make things right? Because the hardest words to utter are, “I’m sorry, I made a mistake.”

 

Let me share a small incident. When I was traveling recently to the West Coast, a friend asked me to take a very important package to her son who was studying there. I readily agreed, packed it into my suitcase, took it along with me – and proceeded to forget all about it, schlepping it right back home with me. Only when I finally unpacked my suitcase upon my return did my heart drop, as I realized my error.

What to do now?

1.  My first reaction: ignore the whole mess-up and avoid the unpleasant ramifications. But her son really did need this package. It was bound to come to the fore, and wouldn’t she be even more upset that I didn’t inform her immediately?

2. Call her and defend myself, effectively freeing me of any guilt. Explain it this way: “Hey, it was nice enough of me to agree to schlep it in the first place.” Find some way of blaming her for not anticipating this by having her son call to remind me about the package.

3. Own up to my mistake and sincerely apologize for it.

The incident was minor enough with small enough at stake that I was able to take the latter path − and truly admit to how idiotic and silly I felt for being so absent-minded. The conversation could have taken a very different turn, but instead the more I carried on about how utterly sorry I felt, the more she reassured me, “You’re only human! Please stop blaming yourself.”

But it did teach me that the more we go against our initial and natural resistance, admit to our wrong and sincerely apologize for it, the softer and more appeasing our friends, spouses, children and coworkers become. On the other hand, the more defensive or blaming we become, the more the situation spirals out of control into a full-blown war.

With minor mistakes, it is easy enough for us to own up to our wrongs. The challenge, however, takes place when it happens in more sensitive areas or in more meaningful relationships – especially when there may be traces of emotional baggage and prior feelings of hurt, resentment, or anger.

I am sorry. Three short words. Three powerful words. Three words that can prevent us from plunging deeper down the wrong path. Will we allow our egos to get in the way of steering us toward this harder, but far more rewarding, path?

Chana Weisberg is the author of several books, including Divine Whispers – Stories that Speak to the Heart and Soul and Tending the Garden: The Unique Gifts of the Jewish Woman. Watch Chana Weisberg’s two-minute videocast on www.chabad.org/intouchfor your dose of weekly inspiration. She is an international inspirational lecturer on a wide array of topics and an editor at chabad.org. She can be reached at chanaw@gmail.com.

Chana Weisberg

The Hardest Three Words to Say

Wednesday, October 29th, 2008

You and your spouse are driving along the highway. You begin to strongly suspect that you have missed your exit. The thought keeps nagging at you, and as more time elapses and the terrain is looking less and less familiar, the more certain you become. Yet as you begin to vociferously demand that your husband turn off the next exit, he stubbornly insists that you are headed in the right direction.


Fifteen minutes have passed. By now you both realize that you are driving on the wrong route. Yet instead of changing paths, your spouse is still hoping beyond hope that this will somehow bring you to your intended destination.


Why is he being so obstinate? Because turning around is admitting that he has made a mistake – and that’s probably the hardest thing for any human being to do.


We all have that highway scenario played out in our lives. We understand that we’re heading down the wrong path and we realize that the longer we continue, the more lost we will become. And yet we obstinately cling to our mistaken ways.


Why? Because it is so incredibly hard to admit that we’ve make a mistake.


You’ve had a disagreement with your spouse, child or coworker. It escalated to the point of ugly comments and incriminating remarks.


You know you were wrong. You know you crossed some red lines. You realize that you should never have brought his mother into the conversation, or that hapless remark he once said (and apologized for dozens of times) more than 10 years ago.


And yet you couldn’t stop yourself. As soon as you began your slippery slide into that nasty terrain of discord, there was no way to prevent plunging full force.


Now the heated moment is behind you. You know you ought to make amends, but every time it occurs to you to apologize, every fiber of your being rebels as your mind begins a full-scale line of defense. You may have been wrong, but he did say/do/act so inconsiderately. Thus, he should be apologizing!


Why remain in a bitter tug of war that is straining your relationship and distancing you further, when an apology could easily make things right? Because the hardest words to utter are, “I’m sorry, I made a mistake.”

 

Let me share a small incident. When I was traveling recently to the West Coast, a friend asked me to take a very important package to her son who was studying there. I readily agreed, packed it into my suitcase, took it along with me – and proceeded to forget all about it, schlepping it right back home with me. Only when I finally unpacked my suitcase upon my return did my heart drop, as I realized my error.


What to do now?


1.  My first reaction: ignore the whole mess-up and avoid the unpleasant ramifications. But her son really did need this package. It was bound to come to the fore, and wouldn’t she be even more upset that I didn’t inform her immediately?


2. Call her and defend myself, effectively freeing me of any guilt. Explain it this way: “Hey, it was nice enough of me to agree to schlep it in the first place.” Find some way of blaming her for not anticipating this by having her son call to remind me about the package.


3. Own up to my mistake and sincerely apologize for it.


The incident was minor enough with small enough at stake that I was able to take the latter path − and truly admit to how idiotic and silly I felt for being so absent-minded. The conversation could have taken a very different turn, but instead the more I carried on about how utterly sorry I felt, the more she reassured me, “You’re only human! Please stop blaming yourself.”


But it did teach me that the more we go against our initial and natural resistance, admit to our wrong and sincerely apologize for it, the softer and more appeasing our friends, spouses, children and coworkers become. On the other hand, the more defensive or blaming we become, the more the situation spirals out of control into a full-blown war.


With minor mistakes, it is easy enough for us to own up to our wrongs. The challenge, however, takes place when it happens in more sensitive areas or in more meaningful relationships – especially when there may be traces of emotional baggage and prior feelings of hurt, resentment, or anger.


I am sorry. Three short words. Three powerful words. Three words that can prevent us from plunging deeper down the wrong path. Will we allow our egos to get in the way of steering us toward this harder, but far more rewarding, path?


Chana Weisberg is the author of several books, including Divine Whispers – Stories that Speak to the Heart and Soul and Tending the Garden: The Unique Gifts of the Jewish Woman. Watch Chana Weisberg’s two-minute videocast on www.chabad.org/intouchfor your dose of weekly inspiration. She is an international inspirational lecturer on a wide array of topics and an editor at chabad.org. She can be reached at chanaw@gmail.com.

Chana Weisberg

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/jewess-press/the-hardest-three-words-to-say/2008/10/29/

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