web analytics
November 28, 2015 / 16 Kislev, 5776
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Yeshiva University’

‘Names, Not Numbers’ Holocaust Survivors’ Interviews Enters 11th Year at YUHSB

Thursday, September 24th, 2015

(JNi.media) Yeshiva University High School for Boys (YUHSB) at 2540 Amsterdam Avenue in Washington Heights, Manhattan, is now offering the course “Names, Not Numbers” as a 12th grade elective, Ari Hagler reported for MTA News. Participants will interview Holocaust survivors and later compile their stories into a documentary film. The program had its first meeting a week ago Thursday, with documentary filmmaker Michael Puro.

Puro, whose filmography consists mainly of editing work on a variety of documentary films, both short and full length, is the director of the 2010 film “Names, Not Numbers,” which featured 23 students from three Jewish day schools who came together to record oral histories of Holocaust Survivors.

Tova Fish-Rosenberg created the program back in 2004, transforming traditional history lessons into a lively, interactive, nontraditional experience that involves individuals who have actually lived through the history being taught. Other Jewish schools that have incorporated the program include Yeshiva University High School for Girls, ESW in Houston, Jewish Day School of the Leigh Valley in Allentown, Pa, and the Rambam yeshiva in Baltimore.

“After the training and research, the students gain first hand knowledge through being paired with and given the opportunity to interview and videotape Holocaust survivors, World War II veterans who liberated camps, survivors who later immigrated to pre-1948 Israel, and second generation, who are now living in the same communities as the students,” states the website. “Oral histories of this era depict either survivors or veterans. The students are preserving on videotape and DVD, a small segment of the history of World War II and its aftermath with the connections to Israel. At the same time the participants form intergenerational friendships with their interview subjects.”

Sample interview questions include (although the website cautions that not all of these will be appropriate for everyone):

Describe what your life was like growing up before the war.

Can you tell us what the Jewish community was like?

Did you play a sport?

What did you do for fun with your friends?

How old were you when you first heard the name Hitler?

How did things change when the Germans invaded?

What was it like when Hitler came to power?

Did you have non – Jewish friends before the Holocaust and how did they react to the changes?

Describe what it was like to leave your home with almost no possessions.

What was it like to be in hiding?

What was daily life like in the ghetto /concentration camp?

Do you have a tattooed number? How did you feel when you lost your identity and became a number?

What kind of activities did you do there?

What interesting /moving story would you like to share with us?

How / why did you join the resistance / partisans?

Can you describe liberation day?

What happened to you after you were liberated?

Did other members of your family survive?

How did you come to Israel or America?

Do you have any mementos/ pictures of your family to show us?

Did the Holocaust affect your belief in Hashem?

Finally, the last two questions for the survivors and liberators are important to ask, according to the website:

In what ways does the Holocaust affect your life today?

What kind of message would you like to pass on to young people and to future generations?

Yeshiva University President Richard Joel Announces Retirement

Thursday, September 10th, 2015

Yeshiva University President Richard Joel has announced he plans to step down at the end of his current term, and possibly earlier if a successor can be found before 2018.

The announcement was made by Joel, 65, in an email sent to YU alumni, staff and students on Thursday.

“I am well into my 13th year of the presidency and the 28th year of leading Jewish educational institutions,” Joel wrote.

“When I accepted a third term as president, I informed our chair, Henry Kressel, that it would be my last.

“As we now are poised to advance, I have asked chairman Moshael Straus to begin the process of transition and to identify and recruit my successor. This wonderful and committed lay leadership deserves to have the time to be deliberate in that process.”

Earlier in the day on Thursday (Sept. 10) Yeshiva University and Montefiore Health System announced they sealed a landmark deal between the two that gives Montefiore operational authority and responsibility over Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein).

Under the agreement, Yeshiva University remains responsible for academic oversight, including the granting of degrees. YU also runs a satellite program in Israel.

Montefiore, Yeshiva University Close Deal on Einstein Med School

Thursday, September 10th, 2015

Montefiore Health System (Montefiore) and Yeshiva University (Yeshiva) sealed a landmark deal between the two that gives Montefiore operational authority and responsibility over Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein).

Under the agreement, Yeshiva remains responsible for academic oversight, including the granting of degrees, according to a statement released today (Thursday, Sept. 10) by the two institutions.

The agreement comes half a century after the affiliation between the two was first signed. “As the University Hospital for Albert Einstein College of Medicine we have together strengthened the shared missions of our two institutions in a way that few Academic Medical Centers have been able to achieve,” said Steven M. Safyer, M.D., president and CEO, Montefiore.

“Montefiore and Einstein have become the example of what transformative care, science and education can be. This new agreement which brings us even closer will be the first step toward a more secure and sustainable future.” “Montefiore and Einstein’s relationship is rooted in shared values and a commitment to social justice. This historic agreement will perpetuate Einstein as a top-tier medical school and research institution by deepening the bonds between Montefiore and Einstein. Further integrating the institutions’ faculty, students, and staff, will align operations to best advance science and medicine and build on traditions of service and success,” said the statement issued to media. “This is part of a journey that began when Yeshiva University founded Einstein 60 years ago,” said Richard M. Joel, president, Yeshiva University. “Albert Einstein lent his name to this fledgling institution at a time when Jewish students were turned away from other schools.

“The new imperative in today’s complex health care environment is to formally link this now world-class medical school and research institution to a world-class health system. Yeshiva University continues its historic commitment to medical education while we further our unique mission to prepare students through a contemporary academic education enlightened by Jewish values.”

Yeshiva University operates a satellite program in Jerusalem as well.

Harvard, Stanford, MIT top 2015 Shanghai Ranking, Hebrew U 67th, Technion 18th in CS

Sunday, August 16th, 2015

(JNi.media) Harvard University is still number one in the world, for the 13th year, in the 2015 Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) released on Saturday by the Center for World-Class Universities at Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

Harvard is followed by Stanford, MIT, Berkeley, Cambridge, Princeton, Caltech, Columbia, Chicago and Oxford. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem ranks 67th, after having dropped in 2014 from 59th to 70th place.

The Technion-Israel Institute of Technology is ranked 18th in the world in computer science in 2015.

Starting in 2003, ARWU has been presenting the world Top 500 universities annually, based on a set of objective indicators and third-party data. It is considered a trustworthy source, using six objective indicators to rank world universities, including the number of alumni and staff winning Nobel prizes and Fields medals; the number of highly cited researchers; the number of articles published in journals of nature and science; the number of articles indexed in Science Citation Index – Expanded and Social Sciences Citation Index, and per capita performance.

More than 1200 universities are ranked by ARWU every year and the best 500 scores are published.

The Technion is in 77th place on the list of world academic institutions. Tel Aviv University ranks between 151-200, alongside Weizmann Institute of Science. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev ranks between 401-500.

Haifa University did not make the top 500 institutions.

Yeshiva University was ranked between 201-300. Yeshiva’s ranking has been on a steady decline in the Shanghai ranking, down from the 100-200 band in 2003-4. The only area where Yeshiva has retained its 151-200 ranking in 2015 is clinical medicine and pharmacy.

The top world academic institution in natural sciences and mathematics in 2015 is the University of California, Berkeley, followed by Harvard, Princeton and Stanford Universities. The Technion ranks in the 51-75 band, together with Hebrew University and the Weizmann Institute of Science. Tel Aviv University ranks in the 101-150 band.

The top world academic institution in computer science in 2015 is Stanford University, followed by MIT, UC Berkeley, Harvard, Princeton, Carnegie Mellon, the University of Texas at Austin, Cornell, UCLA, and USC.

The 18th ranked Technion is followed by Tel Aviv University which ranks 20th in computer science, and the Hebrew U and Weizmann which are in the 76-100 band in the same category. Ben-Gurion is in the 101-150 band. Bar-Ilan University is in the 151-200 band in computer science.

Thousands Mourn Rabbi Lichtenstein

Tuesday, April 21st, 2015

Approximately 10,000 men and women mourned Rabbi Aharon Lichtenstein at eulogies and the funeral for the Torah sage who left Yeshiva University and moved to Israel, where he was a leading national religious rabbi and head of the Hat Etzion Yeshiva in Gush Etzion.

He was 81.

Hundreds of the mourners, many of them former students, flew last night to Israel to attend the funeral.

Rabbi Lichtenstein was buried in Jerusalem after eulogies at the yeshiva he headed in the community of Alon Shvut.

His son Rabbi Moshe Lichtenstein told mourners Tuesday of his father:

You were a soldier of Torah who stood at guard duty. You were general of Torah.

You were a scholar and a devoted father. You have established an entire world.

One morning I saw you sitting in a room in conversation on the telephone, and I did not understand why you did not go for morning prayers. When you finished, you told me you were talking with a mother whose son was murdered in a terrorist attack. She did not even know you, and you give her support and guidance.

Another son, Rabbi Yitzchak Lichtenstein, related that his father “did not know what anger was and never engaged in slander.”

Rabbi Lichtenstein was born in France shortly after the Nazi occupation. His family escaped to the U.S. when he was seven years old. He earned a doctorate in literature at Harvard University after learning at Yeshiva University, where he eventually returned to teach and learn under Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik, whose daughter he married.

Rabbi Lichtenstein moved to Israel one year after answering the late Rabbi Yehuda Amital’s request to help lead the new Har Etzion Yeshiva in Alon Shvut, where he lived until his death Monday.

rav l eulogy

rav l inside yeshiva

rav l tent

My Encounter with Rav Lichtenstein

Tuesday, April 21st, 2015

Some 25 years ago I decided I wanted to go to Israel and debated over which Yeshiva I would attend.

The “Gush”, Yeshiva Har Etzion, Rav Aharon Lichtenstein’s yeshiva in Israel, was one of the options on my very short list.

I applied, and was invited to come down to Yeshiva University for an interview with Rav Lichtenstein.

I spent weeks preparing for that interview. I picked out an interesting piece of Gemorah, and learned it backwards and forwards.

I walked confidently into Rav Soloveitchik’s apartment in YU where Rav Lichtenstein was holding interviews with prospective students, and we began to learn. He asked questions and I answered them. I defended my positions. Very straightforward.

And then I don’t know what happened.

He raised a question from a different Gemorah related to this particular sugiyah. A Gemorah I had also studied in preparation for this interview.

I don’t recall it even being a complex question. But his question came from a perspective I hadn’t considered, and it turned everything upside down. Suddenly we had to take everything I learned apart, and we started again from a completely different angle.

I walked into that interview thinking I knew that Gemorah like the back of my hand, and by the middle of this experience, I realized I knew almost nothing, including how to learn.

What was supposed to have been a 15 minute interview, turned into an intense, more than hour-long learning session and intellectual battle, the likes of which I had never experienced in my entire life.

I walked out of the apartment as white as a sheet, and covered in sweat from the energy I expended in the intellectual battle I just fought and lost with Rav Lichtenstein, realizing that my weeks of learning, where I thought I knew the Gemorah inside and out, had barely scraped the surface of the depths of what learning truly was.

The students who were waiting patiently outside for for their turn, took one look at me and were afraid to go in next for their interviews.

While it had been intellectually satisfying, I was sure I hadn’t been accepted to the Gush after displaying how embarrassing little I had managed to actually learn in the few weeks ahead of the interview, compared to what we had accomplished in such a short time.

But to my surprise I was accepted.

Ultimately, I chose a different path to Israel, but that encounter — learning with Rav Lichtenstein — was the yardstick by which I measured the quality of my learning from that point forward.

Rabbi Aharon Lichtenstein Dies at Age 81

Monday, April 20th, 2015

Rabbi Aharon Lichtenstein, a leading national religious figure and chief rabbi of the Har Etzion Yeshiva in Gush Etzion, died Monday morning at the age of 81. He will be buried on Tuesday in Gush Etzion.

His health has been declining in recent years.

He was born in Paris shortly after the Nazi occupation, but his family managed to escape to the United States. He studied at Yeshiva Rabbi Chaim Berlin, Yeshiva University and at Harvard, where he earned a doctorate in English Literature.

Rabbi Lichtenstein was married to a daughter of Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik, under whom he studied. He was head rabbi of Yeshiva University before moving to Israel

He joined Rabbi Yehuda Amital to head the Har Etzion Yeshiva in 1971, and he maintained a close connection with Yeshiva University through its Gruss Institute affiliate in Jerusalem and its Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary.

Rabbi Lichtenstein was awarded the Israel Prize for Jewish Literature last year on Yom Ha’Atzmaut.

He and his wife, Dr. Tova Lichtenstein, moved in 2005 from Jerusalem to Alon Shvut, where Yeshiva Har Etzion is located.

They had six children.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/rabbi-aaron-lichtenstein-dies-at-age-81/2015/04/20/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: