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September 23, 2014 / 28 Elul, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘ZOA’

Hotel Owner who Kicked Jews Out Hosting Anti-Jihadists

Friday, January 25th, 2013

In 2012 the Jewish Press reported on the successful lawsuit against the Muslim owner of a swanky Santa Monica hotel who, while exclaiming, “Get the [expletive deleted] Jews out of my pool,” had her employees do just that.  The plaintiffs had been at the hotel at a fundraiser they hosted for a pro-Israel organization, the Friends of the Israel Defense Forces (FIDF).

The jury found the hotel and its owner, Tehmina Adaya, had committed “particularly reprehensible” acts of discrimination against the plaintiffs, and specifically, that Adaya had acted with “malice, oppression and fraud,” slapping her with punitive damages.

When word got out about what Adaya had done to the FIDF volunteers, members of  the Los Angeles office of the ZOA planned a protest in front of the hotel.  Adaya met that public relations protest by sending an underling to promise the activists she would host an event for them at her expense within a year in exchange for cancelling the protest.  They accepted the offer and called off the protest.

When the trial ended and the jury returned its verdict finding that Adaya had discriminated against Jews, she and the ZOA group issued their agreed-upon statements.  In hers, Adaya said she was opposed to anti-Semitism.  Adaya also claimed she had not done any of the things she had been accused of, or had been found liable for.  The ZOA LA statement included, “we believe that her statement exhibits the Jewish value of teshuva, repentance.”

As Miles Lozano, the Shangri-La public relations manager told the Jewish Press at the time, “the steps Adaya is taking are intended to address the Shangri-La’s public relations issues, whereas the court case dealt only with the legal issues.”

Adaya is still working with a bifurcated plan: on the legal front, she has appealed the ruling by the jury that she committed particularly reprehensible acts of discrimination against Jews, and at the same time, she is footing the bill for an event which is now a fundraiser for the new organization of the former ZOA director, Orit Arfa (Arfa was fired by the ZOA in the fall).  Strikingly, that event is headlining two of the world’s most renown and controversial anti-Jihadi activists, Pamela Geller of Atlas Shrugs.com, and Robert Spencer, of Jihadwatch.com.

Geller garnered a great deal of attention over the past several months by running a series of ads in New York City, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C. transit systems which state: “In any war between the civilized man and the savage, choose civilized man.  Support Israel. Defeat Jihad.” Muslim groups such as Council on American-Islamic Relations, Islamic Society of North America, Muslim Public Affairs Council and others were outraged and pushed back hard.  In September, Mona Eltahawy, an Egyptian-American activist, was arrested for vandalizing one of Geller’s posters in New York.

When asked how she felt about being hosted by someone who had engaged in such reprehensible acts of discrimination against Jews, Geller told the Jewish Press,

“The public renunciation by Adaya of one of the most egregious and monstrous acts of anti-Semitism in modern times is something to celebrate.  She is underwriting the cost of a gala costume ball honoring two of America’s leading critics of Islamic anti-Semitism, and at a Purim event, perhaps this is Haman avenged!  ‘Cause it’s the same hate, different era.”

When one of the plaintiffs in the case against the hotel was asked about the Shangri-La Purim party, the response was not as enthusiastic.  The plaintiff told the Jewish Press that she and the other plaintiffs found the response to Adaya and the Shangri-La Hotel by some in the pro-Israel community to be “deeply disappointing.”  Why?  The plaintiff gave several reasons:

First, despite what the ZOA director wrote at the time, there was no teshuva by Adaya – she is still claiming not to have done anything wrong and everyone knows the steps for teshuva are first, acknowledgement that one acted wrongly, and second, apologizing to the one wronged.  To this day Adaya and her hotel have not apologized to the plaintiffs.  But second, given that the FIDF was the wronged party, why isn’t Adaya having a fundraiser for the FIDF?  Instead, the Purim Gala is to help promote a new organization created by the former ZOA employee who falsely claimed Adaya had done teshuva.

There are other ways to divine the sincerity of Adaya’s gesture.  Court papers filed by her new attorneys on January 7, offered several reasons to justify Adaya being given a new trial.  Much emphasis was placed on the “fact” that one of the jurors hid that she was Jewish.  According to the filed papers, Adaya is claiming that one of the jurors “failed to disclose her religious background, Jewish,” during the jury selection process.  Two problems with that: there’s no legal bar to a Jewish juror sitting on a case about anti-Semitic discrimination, and Adaya’s lawyers never asked the juror whether she was Jewish during the jury selection process.

ZOA Loses Tax Exemption Status, Will Apply for Reinstatement

Wednesday, September 12th, 2012

The Zionist Organization of America has lost its 501(c)3 tax exemption status, due to failure to file tax returns for the last three years.

In an interview with JTA, ZOA president Morton Klein confirmed the loss, and stated that his organization has hired a tax attorney to help them bring their files up to date and apply for reinstatement of their status.

According to Klein, the error in filing was due to the failure of a ZOA-funded school in Ashkelon to provide correct information in time, as well as a misunderstanding on the part of the ZOA as to the amount of time it had left to file for an extension.

Jury Said Hotel Owner Is Anti-Semitic, But She Insists: ‘Some of My Best Friends Are Jewish’

Sunday, August 26th, 2012

The Santa Monica hotel owner recently found liable by a jury for dozens of counts of anti-Semitic discrimination has issued a press release in which she claims she deplores anti-Semitism.  Not only that, but, to replay one of her losing defenses at trial, some of her best friends are Jews. And, she claims, she never did or said the things the jury determined she did.

On August 15, the jury in a discrimination lawsuit returned a verdict against Tehmina Adaya, owner of the Shangri-La Hotel in Santa Monica, finding that she had repeatedly violated the California Civil Rights Act and committed various other acts of discrimination against a group of 18 plaintiffs.  The plaintiffs had attended a July, 2010 Friends of the IDF charity fundraiser for a program that sends to summer camp the children of Israeli soldiers who were killed while serving.  That charity event was held at the pool area of the Shangri-La Hotel.

According to sworn testimony presented at trial, when the hotel owner saw the FIDF banner and literature, she shouted, “get those [expletive] Jews out of my pool,” at which point her staff forced everyone in the pool with a blue FIDF wristband to get out, took down the FIDF banners and literature, and attempted to remove from the premises all of those attending the pro-Israel charity event.

The Western Region ZOA office planned a public protest to take place on August 26th, in front of the Shangri-La Hotel.  The protest was planned, according to Orit Arfa, executive director of that ZOA office, as part of the ZOA’s mandate – “to take stands against anti-Zionism.”

In response to publicity about the protest, a representative for Shangri-La spoke with ZOA leadership.  When Adaya agreed to issue a public statement condemning anti-Semitism, announcing donations to two Israeli charities, and hosting a future ZOA pro-Israel event at her hotel, the protest was called off.

“I care deeply about the hurt, anger and misunderstanding that has resulted and I want the Jewish and pro-Israel community to know I condemn anti-Semitism,” Adaya wrote in her press release.  She continued, “I pride myself on having close Jewish friends and senior staff, employees representing 12 countries, and we welcome guests from around the world. While I regret I didn’t publicly address this sooner given my belief in my innocence, I support Israel and seek to enhance relationships with people of all backgrounds.”

In addition to sharing what she described as her “sensitivity to Jewish groups and Israel,” Adaya, a jet-setting, multi-millionaire, announced she was donating $3600 each to two Israeli charities, the Koby Mandell Foundation, which supports victims of terrorism, and the Zahal Disabled Veterans Organization.

James Turken, the plaintiffs’ lawyer in the discrimination lawsuit, was not moved by Adaya’s efforts.  Although Adaya spent much of her release extolling her sensitivities and trumpeting her donations, she also claimed she had not said and done what the jury determined was the case.  What’s more, she mischaracterized what the jury said and found in a way that, at least for legal experts, goes beyond mere spin.

According to her statement, Adaya “never made any disparaging comments to anyone who attended an event here.”  That’s true, but no one claimed she had.  In fact, on the day the Jews were rounded up and removed from her pool, and throughout the hours-long effort to salvage the event, Adaya refused to talk to or meet with the plaintiffs and only dealt with them through her intermediaries.

But of greater concern to Turken was Adaya’s public relations claim that “While the jury found that the hotel did not have proper business protocols in place, they did not claim or believe she made discriminatory comments to any of the plaintiffs.”

Turken told The Jewish Press: “This is an effort at spin control that ignores reality.  The entire proceeding is a public record, as are the verdicts.  The jury found multiple violations of the Unruh Act – that is a civil rights act which can only be violated by acts of discrimination.  Further, the jury awarded treble damages which are only triggered when there is a finding that a defendant’s actions were “particularly reprehensible.”  In addition, Turken explained, “the award of punitive damages was only legally permissible because the jury found Adaya had acted with malice, oppression and fraud.”

Jewish Mega-Philanthropist Backing Gingrich, Drawing Critique

Friday, January 27th, 2012

Republican US presidential hopeful Newt Gingrich’s relationship with Jewish megabillionaire and foremost donor Sheldon Adelson has raised the ire of critics, who say Gingrich’s very public support for Israel is an exchange for support.

Gingrich reiterated his belief that the Palestinians are an “invented” people at a CNN Republican debate in Florida ahead of Tuesday’s primary, promising to issue an executive order moving the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, in accordance with a law passed by Congress in 1995 which has been waived by every US President since.

View statements to the Republican Jewish Coalition in June 2011 by Gingrich, posted by his campaign on YouTube:

At the time the Jerusalem Embassy Act, which stated that “”Jerusalem should be recognized as the capital of the State of Israel; and the United States Embassy in Israel should be established in Jerusalem” as an “undivided city”, was passed, Gingrich was Speaker of the House of Representatives. It was during that tenure that Gingrich met Sheldon Adelson, wealthy casino resort magnate and staunch advocate for Israel.  To assist in promoting the law, Adelson arrived in Washington to talk to leaders about the matter on Capitol Hill.  Gingrich introduced the legislation, and Adelson and Gingrich’s relationship grew.  Ultimately Adelson became a big sponsor of the work Gingrich did prior to his candidacy, and then the foremost supporter of the campaign itself.

Adelson, who grew up as the son of poor Ukrainian Jewish immigrants to Boston, scratched his way to the top in business, first selling toiletries and ultimately becoming owner of 3 successful Las Vegas casino hotel s and convention centers, as well as contracts for casinos in Macau and Singapore.  He is now the 8th wealthiest person in the United States, according to Forbes’ most recent ranking, behind George Soros and ahead of Jim Walton.

Since making his billions, Adelson has earned a name as a pre-eminent Jewish philanthropist, giving $100 million to the Birthright Jewish identity-building project taking youth on trips to Israel, $25 million to the Yad VaShem Holocaust Memorial in Israel, and donated a new headquarters to the Israel lobby in Washington, AIPAC, despite his reservations that the organization is overly pro-Palestinian.  Adelson is against a two-state solution which would give the Palestinian Authority control over lands historically belonging to the Jewish people, and has supported Gingrich’s remarks on the subject of Palestinian nationhood.

Adelson also started the free daily newspaper distributed in major Israeli cities called Israel HaYom (Israel Today), which espouses views leaning more toward Likud than Labor.

Adelson’s wife, Miriam, is an Israeli-born doctor specializing in the treatment of addictions.  Together, they have opened treatment centers in Las Vegas and Tel Aviv.  The pair have made many of their contributions in tandem, with Miriam donating $5 million of the $10 million the couple have thus-far given to Gingrich’s campaign.

While media speculations that Gingrich’s pro-Israel outlook was bought by Adelson, Gingrich told the Associated Press that he has only promised Adelson to “seek to defend the United States and United States allies,” with Zionist Organization of America (ZOA) President Morton Klein telling the AP that Gingrich has been known as “one of the few politicians who has had the courage to tell the truth about Israel,” saying that is probably why they formed a relationship.

As for himself, Adelson says that his support for Gingrich comes from an interest in helping his friend win.  “Our means of support might be more than others are able to offer,” Adelson said, “but like most Americans, words such as friendship and loyalty still mean something to us.”

No Retirement In Sight For The ZOA

Wednesday, December 23rd, 2009

ZOA – The Zionist Organization of America hosted its 112th Annual Gala Dinner in New York City last week, and since I happened to be in the “neighborhood,” visiting the tri-State area for an upcoming simcha – I decided to attend.

One of the facts I learned about this venerable organization was that it was launched in 1897 – almost half a century before the creation of the modern State of Israel.

At the time, Jews in various parts of the world were – at worst – being massacred in pogroms, or at best discriminated against, e.g. denied entry into hotels, universities, country clubs and medical schools. In fact some of the best hospitals in North America were built in order to accommodate newly minted doctors who could not get residencies in local hospitals.

The 19th century ideology called Zionism was born – even though for centuries Jewish had been longing for Moshiach and a return to Eretz Yisrael – with the goal of having a Jewish homeland created, where Jews would live their lives with the rights and privileges of full fledged citizens, like their non-Jewish peers in the countries they lived in.

A troubling thought struck me as I looked at the hundreds of guests who robustly joined in the singing of Israel’s national anthem early in the program. Why are we here? Why is there a ZOA hosting a fundraising event? After all, wasn’t the Zionist dream fulfilled over 60 years ago? Haven’t the majority of Jews living today grown up with the reality of a Jewish country called Israel – a country with many colors and favors, peopled by Jews of all nationalities?

Israel has succeeded no doubt beyond the wildest imagination of the Zionists of old – for not only does the State of Israel exist but she more than holds her own in the global community of nations. Indeed Israel surpasses many longer established counties in the uplifting of the arts and sciences, including life-enhancing, cutting-edge innovations in 21st century technology and medical research.

So why hasn’t the ZOA “emptied its desk, shut off the lights and shut the door behind it?”

Because, as speaker after speaker pointed out, including Minority Whip Congressman Eric Cantor (R: VA) and General Moshe Ya’alon, former IDF chief of staff, from the moment the Zionist dream was actualized, it has been forced into an existential nightmare.

War after war was launched against the newborn state, and when she prevailed, despite the overwhelming number of armies bent on wiping her off the map, (how appropriate that the dinner took place during Chanukah) new tactics were used against her residents, including hundreds of acts of terrorism – basically a war of attrition – with civilians (of all faiths and creeds) being randomly murdered a handful at a time.

And in recent years Israel has had to deal with a new battle – a war of words, in which a country willing to slice off chunks of her tiny self in desperate bids for peace is demonized in the court of public opinion. Not just by her long-standing enemies – but by her supposed friends.

And that is why, so tragically, the door of the Zionist organization of America is still open decades after the realization of a Jewish homeland. The battle to defend the Jewish people and the State of Israel’s integrity has not ended – nor is it likely to any time soon. If anything, the growling from the international community grows louder and more threatening and vicious. As the child of Holocaust survivors, I have experienced the births, in recent years, of my late parents’ great-grandchildren with equal dollops of joy and worry.

However, as the story of Chanukah teaches us – we must have faith. AS ZOA president Mort Klein pointed out in a somber but inspiring speech, the State of Israel did not enjoy peace in her the past, nor has she in the present, nor will she in the foreseeable future. However, Israel can exist and thrive without peace – as evidenced by her existence.

The Land of Israel, Klein pointed out, is referred to in the Bible as the “Promised Land” – promised by G-d to the Jewish People.

And the Jewish People are eternal. As we learn from the Maccabees and a review of global Jewish history, we have been marginalized, knocked down, outnumbered, slandered, threatened physically and spiritually, demeaned, degraded, despised and decimated. Yet we overcome, bounce back, fight and prevail.

Did Group Raise Money For Hamas On American Campuses?

Wednesday, December 9th, 2009


WASHINGTON – A U.S. congressman is the latest to call for a Justice Department investigation into whether a pro-Palestinian group has been raising money on college campuses for Hamas.


In a letter to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, Rep. Brad Sherman (D-Calif.) urged a probe into Viva Palestina USA, a humanitarian aid convoy led by British lawmaker George Galloway that brought medical supplies to Gaza last July.


Both the Zionist Organization of America and Anti-Defamation League in recent months have urged Holder to investigate reports about the convoy’s links to Hamas.


The groups made their requests after Galloway and other Viva Palestina USA members appeared and reportedly raised funds at some college campuses in the spring and summer.


“Clearly, people and organizations in the United States cannot be allowed to solicit funds for foreign terrorist organizations,” Sherman wrote in his letter to Holder.


“That such solicitation is occurring during the middle of the day at a public university is truly frightening,” he said, referring to the University of California, Irvine.


Sherman wrote similar letters expressing concern about the reports on Viva Palestina USA to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, University of California, Irvine chancellor Michael Drake and Internal Revenue Service commissioner Douglas Shulman.


Viva Palestina USA was launched after the Viva Palestina group that Galloway set up in Britain sent a convoy to Gaza in March. It did not respond to request for comment.



At a meeting in Gaza with Hamas officials during the March trip, according to a report from terrorism expert Steven Emerson, Galloway held up a bag of cash and said, “This is not charity. This is politics” and “We are giving this money now to the government of Palestine. And, if I could, I would give them 10 times, 100 times more.”


When the Viva Palestina USA convoy arrived in Gaza months later, there was no similar public event with Hamas, although the group reportedly did meet with Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh.


Giving humanitarian aid to Gaza is legal under U.S. law, but providing it to Hamas officials or the Hamas government in Gaza would likely be considered illegal because Hamas is on the list of foreign terrorist organizations.


The most controversial appearance by Viva Palestina USA and Galloway in the United States came May 21 at the University of California, Irvine, a campus that has experienced tensions between Jewish and Muslim students and where a civil rights complaint was filed earlier this decade claiming a hostile environment for Jewish students. (A federal investigation found that the university acted appropriately.)


UC-Irvine has referred information about the event, which was sponsored by the Muslim Student Union, to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. ZOA leaders said they had obtained a video of the event and, at the bureau’s request, passed it on to law enforcement officials.


The university also says it is investigating whether the Muslim Student Union had violated university policy by raising money without the university’s authorization.


In a letter to the university’s campus counsel, the Muslim Student Union acknowledged that it may have “unknowingly breached university policy (as undoubtedly have every student organization on campus as well as university administrators).” But the student group rejected ZOA’s accusations that it may have raised money for Hamas as “nothing short of libel.”


“ZOA seeks to smear MSU’s reputation by maliciously accusing MSU of breaking U.S. laws without providing any real evidentiary backing,” the group said in its letter.


The ZOA praised the university’s decision to forward information on the Viva Palestina fund raising.


“They’ve done the right thing,” said Susan Tuchman, director of the ZOA’s Center for Law and Justice. “All groups should be held accountable.”


University spokeswoman Cathy Lawhon said the campus police forwarded information on the Viva Palestina fund raising to the FBI because it felt “they were the best agency to handle it.” She said outside counsel is examining whether the Muslim Student Union violated campus procedures.

(JTA)

Creating ‘Synergy’ Between Israel And The U.S.

Wednesday, November 11th, 2009

Nearly two years ago, the Zionist Organization of America (ZOA) opened an Israel office in Jerusalem. The director of the office, Jeff Daube, made aliyah after years of working with organizations like AIPAC, NORPAC, CAMERA and Palestinian Media Watch as well as lobbying extensively on Capitol Hill.

Soon after arriving in Israel, Daube made headlines when he was detained by Israeli police for handing out factual booklets about Fatah, which the police deemed “seditious,” and later with the opening of a ZOA branch at the Shalom House in Hebron in an effort to prevent the eviction of Jewish settlers there.

Daube recently spoke with The Jewish Press.
 
The Jewish Press: How did your background as an activist prepare you for heading the ZOA office in Israel?

Daube: In the U.S. I worked with many established organizations and activist groups and extensively with leaders in Congress. Over the years of advocacy and networking, I developed an appreciation for the importance of relationship building. A significant portion of my first 20 months in Israel has been spent cultivating those relationships and establishing key contacts. In Israel, where whom you know is perhaps more important than what you know, this is a necessary strategy for achieving one’s political objectives.

What are the goals of the ZOA’s Israel office?

The ZOA in Israel and in the U.S. share the same basic goals: strengthening the bond between our two countries, raising Zionist consciousness, and doing everything possible to ensure the security of Israel. But it didn’t take long for me to decide it would be a mistake to try and duplicate much of the successful work of the U.S. operation.

Rather, I came to view my role here as a unique opportunity to create a synergy between our respective communities, leaderships and institutions. For example, since the establishment of the Netanyahu government I’ve met regularly with a number of members of Knesset and government ministers.

The present Israeli government is much more inclined to share the ZOA perspective on security-related issues than previous governments, and I share with them the feedback I get from my contacts in Congress. My aim, specifically, is to underline for the decision makers and policymakers here that, despite recent setbacks, there is still significant consensus to support Israel should it decide to take more resolute positions.

What specific projects are you currently working on?

My emphasis is on increasing the level of interactivity between members of Knesset and like-minded members of Congress. Because Israeli legislators do not have the typical 18 or more specialists working on each of their staffs as do their counterparts in Washington, they are not necessarily as conversant on all of the issues as we might like them to be, nor do they have in-house experts to guide them when their own knowledge falls short.

I try to improve information access and education in this milieu, especially for junior members of the Knesset, so they can be more compelling presenters of Israeli government policy in their dealings with congressional leaders.

Engaging U.S. leadership not only means providing communication and meeting opportunities between them and Israeli decision makers, it also entails taking them to disputed areas to show how critically important land is to Israel’s security and helping them understand that a Jew has the moral, legal and historical right to live wherever he or she chooses, especially in our biblical heartland.

My best hope for influencing the decision-making process in the halls of power in both countries regarding Israeli security would be via Americans Vote Israel, a parallel grassroots program meant to tap into the enormous political leverage that even a fraction of the 250,000 American citizens living here could provide. We have been steadily mobilizing this community, along with their families, friends and colleagues in the U.S., to engage them further in the political processes both here and abroad.

You’ve been working with American politicians for a long time. Do you see any change in their support for Israel since Obama took office, especially among Democrats?

I’ve made dozens of visits to Capitol Hill and always encountered consistent and strong bipartisan support on our issues. Of course, there may have been some differences with certain members of Congress, but overall we could always count on broad support. Although I am no longer pounding the marble in the Rayburn or Hart Buildings, I still try to keep my finger on the Beltway pulse and I do sense some weakening of support for Israel in general, but particularly among Democrats.

Often when I look at the results of a vote on an Israel-related bill or resolution, I find the overwhelming majority voting against Israel to be Democrats. A recent example: Earlier this year a resolution in support of Israel’s right to defend itself in Gaza passed the House 390-5 with 22 members registering “present.” Of the 27 not voting in favor, 26 were Democrats and one was a nominal Republican, Ron Paul.

Unlike in the ’50s and ’60s, when Democrats were more supportive of Israel, there is now, according to poll after poll, a marked and significant gap between vigorous Republican and tepid Democratic support for Israel. Given Obama’s expressed interest in “putting daylight” between his administration and Israel, I would hope the American Jewish community will reevaluate its near monolithic support for one party.

One can presumably place the relatively new J Street on the opposite end of the spectrum from the ZOA. How does J Street (or similar groups in Israel) impact the ZOA Israel office?

ZOA in the U.S. has done a great job raising consciousness about the dangers of J Street, a counterproductive upstart that has already managed to undermine Israel’s influence on international policy in Washington. Unfortunately, I have been forced to devote a portion of my time – better spent on issues like Iran’s nuclearization – with MKs, other organizations, and the public, explaining how the policies of J Street and like-minded groups are, in fact, inimical to the security interests of the State of Israel.

I have already contacted members of Congress with whom I maintain close ties to respectfully suggest they limit their engagement with this organization that is anything but “pro-Israel” and “pro-peace.” I am also encouraging members of Knesset to do the same. I can’t emphasize enough the potential benefits of having Israeli and U.S. leaders communicate directly with one another to minimize the negative messages from groups like J Street and their minority cohorts in both countries.

What do you perceive as the main difference between American and Israeli politicians?

That is a subject for a thesis! The main differences between Israeli and American politicians involve accountability and style. Because Israeli politicians do not have specific constituencies to which they are continually answerable, they tend to be less attuned to the wishes of their polity. One of my main projects here, organizing the American-Israeli community into a cohesive political force, may yield some dividends in this regard someday.

Another difference is in the Israeli politicians’ readiness to confront an issue head on. Political culture on the Hill demands a certain protocol, with staffers playing a very significant role.

Israeli politicians, on the other hand, with their aides often removed from the conversation, usually cut to the chase. They ask tough questions and expect direct and thoughtful answers.

Also, as with everything else here, the political culture is more informal than in the U.S. – there is a “we’re all in this together” feeling about the issues.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/interviews-and-profiles/creating-synergy-between-israel-and-the-u-s/2009/11/11/

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