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Jewish tradition dictates that, every morning, men say a blessing thanking God for not being born women, “shelo asani isha.” Doesn’t that seem a bit distasteful? In this week’s video, Rabbi Fohrman provides an interpretation that turns on the notion that great evils are often wrought by those who are blithely unaware of the power they wield.

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Rabbi David Fohrman is the dean of Aleph Beta Academy. He has taught at Johns Hopkins University, and was a lead writer and editor for ArtScroll's Talmud translation project. Aleph Beta creates videos to help people experience Torah in way that is relevant and meaningful to them. for more videos, visit: alephbeta.org.

20 COMMENTS

  1. Not at all. That anybody should find it distasteful shows how most American men, including Jewish ones, have been emasculated by feminism. I’m supremely glad that I am a man. I love being able to do the heavy lifting in my house. I love having run marathons in my younger days and finishing in the middle of the men’s pack. I love being able to run through NYC neighborhoods where few Orthodox females would set foot, and sometimes being greeted by ex-students. I love being able to solve problems instead of panicking whenever a little something goes wrong. And it goes on and on. When I say that brakha I close my eyes and run through some of the benefits that accrue to me because of what I have between my legs and the hormone they produce.

    Men of the world unite; you have nothing to lose but your acquired weakness, fear and insecurity.

  2. <Doesn’t that seem a bit distasteful?>
    Not at all. That anybody should find it distasteful shows how most American men, including Jewish ones, have been emasculated by feminism. I'm supremely glad that I am a man. I love being able to do the heavy lifting in my house. I love having run marathons in my younger days and finishing in the middle of the men's pack. I love being able to run through NYC neighborhoods where few Orthodox females would set foot, and sometimes being greeted by ex-students. I love being able to solve problems instead of panicking whenever a little something goes wrong. And it goes on and on. When I say that brakha I close my eyes and run through some of the benefits that accrue to me because of what I have between my legs and the hormone they produce.

    Men of the world unite; you have nothing to lose but your acquired weakness, fear and insecurity.

  3. May I humbly restate one sentence….”men have ALLOWED themselves to become emasculated by feminism. Remember we are defenseless and the weaker of the genders. May I suggest there was some laziness and acceptance on the male part for emasculation to occur in the first place. There are many parts and reasons for human change.

  4. May I humbly restate one sentence…."men have ALLOWED themselves to become emasculated by feminism. Remember we are defenseless and the weaker of the genders. May I suggest there was some laziness and acceptance on the male part for emasculation to occur in the first place. There are many parts and reasons for human change.

  5. Mr. Stern, you don’t know what you are talking about!! There are female firefighters stronger than you, female Olympic runners faster than you, female scientists who solve problems without panicking when something goes wrong because they are smarter than you etc. Just being a man does not make you that great!!!

  6. Mr. Stern, you don't know what you are talking about!! There are female firefighters stronger than you, female Olympic runners faster than you, female scientists who solve problems without panicking when something goes wrong because they are smarter than you etc. Just being a man does not make you that great!!!

  7. A bracha is not a “thank you”. The closest thing to thanking in Hebrew is hoda’a as in “toda” or “modeh ani” (really “hoda’a” means “admitting”). A bracha is something else entirely. So the premise behind the upset is flawed and moot from the beginning…

  8. A bracha is not a "thank you". The closest thing to thanking in Hebrew is hoda'a as in "toda" or "modeh ani" (really "hoda'a" means "admitting"). A bracha is something else entirely. So the premise behind the upset is flawed and moot from the beginning…

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