Photo Credit: Abed Rahim Khatib / Flash 90
Portraits of Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi and Palestinian Authority leader Mahmoud Abbas hang at the Rafah border crossing with Egypt on November 1, 2017.

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi met on Saturday with Palestinian Authority leader Mahmoud Abbas in Sharm el-Sheikh to discuss the cease fire deal being hammered out between Israel and Gaza’s ruling Hamas terrorist organization. Neither side revealed to journalists what was discussed in the meeting.

Both Israel and Hamas are still negotiating; however, the Hamas-linked Al-Akhbar newspaper in Lebanon, quoted by Ynet, published an initial draft of a 10-point cease fire deal between the two sides.

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Hamas would be required to restrain the riots at the border and punish those who violate the agreement.

Riots and flotillas on Mondays would end in northern Gaza, but the so-called “march of return” demonstrations in non-violent form would continue until the end of this calendar year.

Egypt would work towards lifting 70 percent of the blockade on Gaza, until riots are completely terminated.

The Gaza fishing zone would be expanded to 14 nautical miles.

The Kerem Shalom and Erez crossings would open permanently. Israel would grant 5,000 work permits to Gazans under age 40 – but only after the Palestinian Authority pays 80 percent of the salaries of Gaza government workers, and agrees to Qatari payments for the salaries of Hamas officials.

The final four points of the agreement – which aren’t even relevant for the present – include:

* Egypt working to implement a prisoner swap between Israel and Hamas (not under discussion for now);
* a three-year minimum “calm” on the Gaza border under international supervision, headed by the UN and Russia;
* permanent opening of Rafah crossing
* initiation of projects to create 30K jobs for university graduates in Gaza.

Each step is conditioned on completion of the one prior, in a manner similar to that of the Oslo Accords.

However, the draft published by Ynet, has yet to be confirmed by Israeli authorities.

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