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April 20, 2014 / 20 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Hosni Mubarak’

Egyptian Army Turns Tables on Morsi: 48 Hours to Calm Opposition

Monday, July 1st, 2013

Egypt’s defense minister issued Muslim Brotherhood Mohammed Morsi a 48-hour ultimatum on Monday to reach an agreement with the opposition or face a military solution to the violence gripping the country. The ultimatum followed a dictate by the opponents that if Morsi does not quit within 24 hours, they will lead the second rebellion in the country in less than three years.

Defense Minister General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi said the security of the country is being threatened following the death toll of at least 16 and the firebomb attacks on the headquarters of Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood in Cairo.

The Brotherhood guards fired at attackers, and at least five people were killed.

Al-Sisi insisted he was not planning another military regime, but he did into detail what he meant by a “roadmap” if Morsi and the opposition cannot reach an agreement, which deems to be highly doubtful.

The anti-government protests that reached a peak on Sunday and Monday are the largest since those that deposed Hosni Mubarak for power and ushered in elections that catapulted the radical Islamic Muslim Brotherhood into power.

Morsi promptly tried to usurp powers that quickly turned his administration into a clone of the Mubarak regime, denying freedom and promoting corruption.

The economy has collapsed and the government is nearly bankrupt, providing all of the fuel for another rebellion. The lack of a single leader to attract the support of Egyptians is an indication that the people prefer anarchy, making it ripe for the military to take over as it did in the interim period between Mubarak’s ouster and Morsi’s election.

Morsi told the London Guardian that if he were to bow to opposition demands and quit, protesters would be back in the street within a “week or a month.”

Given the gang rapes of foreign journalists that accompanied the protests against Mubarak and that occurred again this week in the growing rebellion against Morsi, and given the  breakdown of law and order and the Muslim war against the Christian Coptic sect, ultimatums and anarchy are the rule of the day in Egypt.

Welcome Back Hosni

Sunday, June 30th, 2013

Call me optimistic, but I wouldn’t be surprised if we see Egypt’s favorite dictator back in power in the near future. The current protests in Egypt have got Morsi on the ropes, and the army certainly doesn’t appear to be backing him at all.

And why should it?

The country has deteriorated to incredibly low levels since Mubarak was kicked out.

I’m willing to bet the Egyptian people would be glad to have Mubarak back at the reins, and putting everything back where it belongs.

Consider this – after being deposed, Mubarak wasn’t shot or hung. Quite an unusual move, I’d say. Almost as if someone (the army?) wanted to keep him in reserve in case things got really, really bad.

Bad, sort of like where Egypt is now, with only a few weeks of gas left.

Morsi, on the other hand, doesn’t really enjoy that kind of support from the army, or the people.

If a coup happens, you can be rest assured that Morsi will most likely quietly find his end somewhere behind a building, and if Mubarak does come back after his extended sabbatical vacation, the rest of the Muslim Brotherhood members will likely be meeting Allah almost as soon.

I just want to remind (the potentially) returning President Mubarak of one thing. It was Fuad Ben-Eliezer and others in the Israeli government that showed you support and offered you asylum when the going got tough, not America, and definitely not your fellow Arab countries. So when you’re back in power and cleaning house, if you could take care of the Sinai for us and those Gaza tunnels, it would be much appreciated.

Israel Calms War Fever, Re-Opens Northern Air Space

Monday, May 6th, 2013

The IDF has taken its fingers off the panic button and has lifted Sunday’s ban on civilian aircraft in the north following the weekend bombing attacks on missiles in Syria.

The closure grounded Arkia’s Haifa-Eilat flights as well as private planes, and it was supposed to stay in effect at least until Thursday.

An army spokeswoman told the French news agency AFP that the closure was expected to end later on Monday, while the IDF confirmed to the Jewish Press that the ban already has been lifted.

“Civilian aviation in northern Israel will resume regular operation following security assessments,” a statement said.

Headlines around the world are screaming that Syria, Lebanon and Israel are prepared for war, and that is correct to the extent that every normal country beefs up its defenses in the face of a perceived threat.

But a sure sign that everyone, particular Hezbollah and Syrian President Bashar Assad, are basically huffing and puffing is that Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu took off for China Sunday night.

It is extremely unlikely that the Prime Minister of Israel would trek off the Far East to promote trade relations if political and military analysts expected war.

Just to make sure Syrian President Bashar Assad understands Israel’s intentions of self-defense by bombing in Syria of Iranian missiles that were about to be handed over to Hezbollah in Lebanon, Israel reportedly sent him a soothing  “don’t worry” message Monday.

Israel has no intention of trying to help the rebels and is not trying to intervene in the civil war, said the message, sent through diplomatic channels, according to the Hebrew language Yediot Acharonot newspaper.

Israel has rarely, if ever, intervened in another country’s political affairs, although critics charge that Israel’s political leaders’ love of American politics has proven the United States to be an exception.

Prime Minister Netanyahu knows full well that it will not relish whoever might replace Assad, termed a “butcher” this week by no less than his former short-lived fair weather friend Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Similarly, Israel uncharacteristically shut up during the Arab Spring rebellion against Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.

The war rhetoric mainly is coming from the other side of the border, with Syrian television even calling on “Palestinians to act against Israel” from the Golan Heights.

However, there are virtually no “Palestinians” in the Golan, where most of those who are not Jewish are Druze.

If Syria meant that the tens of thousands of Palestinians in Syria would cross the Golan Heights border like tourists, of it meant that the Druze are going to fight for Assad, that only shows how much the Syrian regime is living in its own world.

Al Jazeera: US ‘Increasingly Irrelevant’ to the Arabs

Sunday, March 24th, 2013

“U.S. policy in the Arab world has long been widely unpopular, to put it mildly,” on Sunday Sarah Mousa wrote in Al Jazeera. Although President Obama’s 2009 speech in Cairo were met with great enthusiasm, she continues, “the Arab uprisings transformed many peoples’ views on the role played by the US in their region. While Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton did offer verbal support to most of the protest movements, hypocritical selective support, initial American hesitation in backing the uprisings and past policies bolstering dictatorships were not forgotten.”

Mousa, a graduate from Princeton University and a 2010-2011 Fulbright Scholar in Egypt, states: “More crucially, it became clear to many that the outcome of the uprisings was up to them, and not to U.S. policymakers. In the case of Egypt, U.S. statements only called for Hosni Mubarak to step down when it became entirely clear that it was inevitable. While the gesture may have been appreciated by parts of the Egyptian opposition, it was not viewed as a significant turning point.”

Obama’s visit to Israel and the PA were received coolly by Palestinians, writes Mousa. “Young activists referred to the speeches as ‘insipid’ and ‘sycophant.’ The part of Obama’s Jerusalem speech that many Palestinians paid most attention to was an interruption by Palestinian audience member Rabeea Eid: ‘Did you really come here for peace or to give Israel more weapons to kill and destroy the Palestinian people? Did you happen to see the apartheid wall on your way here? There are Palestinians sitting in this hall. This state should be for all of its citizens, not a Jewish state only.’”

We’ve all seen the clip where, as the noisy Eid was being dragged out of the hall, Obama referred to the interruption as a good display of “lively debate.”

Recordings of the incident quickly spread throughout the Palestinian Internet. Obama’s failure to effectively address Palestinian rage on the student’s points, just as Eid was being dragged away and handcuffed, made him a mockery in Palestinian eyes, argues Mousa.

“The U.S. is increasingly irrelevant to movements throughout the region,” she concludes. “In his March visit to Cairo, Secretary of State John Kerry extended invitations to meet with members of opposition parties. Many turned him down. Distour party member Gamila Ismail explained her rejection of the invitation in a scathing letter to Kerry, in which she criticized self-interested U.S. policy that has supported repressive regimes in Egypt for decades.”

Ismail also wrote Kerry: “This is a revolution that will teach the world, as Obama, your president, has said. And we want to teach the world and be a model for it. And we will become different than what you see. Your embassy reports see that we do not deserve anything except this [limited] amount of democracy. And that this [limited] amount is ‘enough’.”

Interestingly, as America is achieving a steady decline in reliance on Middle Eastern oil, American foreign policy no longer views the region with the urgency it did only a decade ago – and the Arab intelligence gets it.

How I wish Benjamin Netanyahu would get it, too.

Muslim Brotherhood Candidate Wins Egyptian Presidential Elections

Monday, June 18th, 2012

Although results from Cairo give establishment candidate Shafiq a 58 percent lead in the capital, winning Cairo will not be enough to put Shafiq ahead of Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mursi in 27 governorates.

If these results stand, Mursi will have won Egypt’s first post-uprising elections with 51.89 per cent of the vote, succeeding toppled dictator Hosni Mubarak.

Downtown Cairo is filled with the sounds of horns and chants as Mursi supporters are descending on Tahrir Square.

Official results will be announced by the Supreme Presidential Electoral Commission on Thursday, June 21, and the ruling military council will “hand over power” on 30 June.

As the vote count began on Sunday, a decree from the ruling military council assigned only limited powers to the new head of state, and reclaimed for the military council the legislative rights of the Islamist-led parliament, after the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) dissolved parliament last week.

Both Liberal and Islamist opponents denounced this as a “military coup.”

The Brotherhood’s Mohamed Mursi was in weekend a run-off election against Ahmed Shafik, former prime minister under the deposed and ailing Hosni Mubarak.

“The results posted by the Mursi campaign on their website, which show Mursi in the lead, reflect to a large degree the results tallied by the electoral committee,” the member, who asked not to be named, told Reuters.

Other officials contacted by Reuters refused to comment on the Brotherhood’s claim.

“The election commission has nothing to do with the announced results,” committee member Mohamed Momtaz said, while a second member, Osama Salama said: “We are still conducting the tally process.”

Another Explosion Rocks Egypt-Israel Gas Pipeline

Sunday, February 5th, 2012

Egyptian state television reported that another explosion has hit the Egypt-Israel gas pipeline on Sunday.

This pipeline has been attacked at least a dozen times since Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak was deposed in February 2011.

According to Reuters, the explosion occurred in the Sinai peninsula, near the coastal town of al-Arish.

 

 

Islamists Win Over 70% of Egyptian Parliament

Sunday, January 22nd, 2012

Egypt’s Islamic parties won a resounding victory in the first elections since the overthrow of dictator Hosni Mubarak in February 2011, garnering over two-thirds of the seats in the new People’s Assembly.

The Muslim Brotherhood’s party – The Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) – won 235 seats in the national legislature (47.18%), the Salafist Al-Nur party came second with 121 seats (24.29%), and the liberal Wafd party was third with 9%.

The two-chamber People’s Assembly is particularly important because it is responsible for selecting a 100-member panel to draft a constitution.

A new president will be elected by June 2012.

Nine Dead, Hundreds Wounded in Egyptian Protests

Saturday, December 17th, 2011

At least nine people have been killed and over 300 wounded in two days of violent clashes between Egyptian security forces and protestors.

Hundreds of Egyptian soldiers taking orders from the incumbent Egyptian military council, beat and electric-shocked protestors to the ground on Saturday. They also burned down a protestors’ field hospital and erected a wall of concrete blocks to divide Tahrir Square from the area of the parliament and cabinet buildings. The clashes began late Thursday, after anti-military protestors demanding an end to military rule and the transfer of power to civilian authority were ousted from their camp near Tahrir square, with one protestor being beaten by military police.

Tahrir had once been the backdrop of an 18-day protest leading to the ousting of President Hosni Mubarak.  At that time, the military was seen as a partner in the revolution and a protector of the people.

The new protests against the military council and the council’s subsequent crackdown took place after the first rounds of democratic parliamentary elections saw large turnouts, particularly in favor of the militant Muslim Brotherhood and the fundamentalist Salafi/Wahhabi parties.

In November, over 40 people were killed in six days of crackdowns on demonstrators.

Kamal el-Ganzouri, who was appointed interim prime minister following the unseating of Mubarak by the military, addressed the nation on Monday, denying that forces had shot anyone or used violence, and accusing some protestors of having less-than-pure intentions in their activism.

In the meantime, protestors contended that soldiers were indeed firing on them, as well as confiscating cameras and other journalistic equipment, and videos being released showed military police pointing guns and protestors and hitting them.  The military council on Friday issued a statement claiming soldiers were acting self-defense against lawless insurgents armed with Molotov cocktails and rocks.

The Muslim Brotherhood condemned the crackdown, saying the military council had betrayed the Egyptian people’s trust, disrupting the democratic process, instigating unrest, and destabilizing the handover of power.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/nine-dead-hundreds-wounded-in-egyptian-protests/2011/12/17/

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