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April 24, 2014 / 24 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘package’

Easy Weeknight Dinners – Grown-Up Grub The Whole Family Can Enjoy!

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

Now that my son has graduated from mashed entrées of sweet potatoes and carrots to grown-up grub, it’s back in the kitch for me! Farewell to the days of slacking off by serving frozen pizza and cold cut sandwiches for dinner. I may be a foodie; however, after a long day of juggling work and taking care of my son, a mom needs a break! Since take out and frozen dinners no longer make the cut, I have been on the hunt for easy weekday meals that taste great and are quick to whip up. Below are some of my fave dishes to serve for supper that guarantee no leftovers.

Meat Sauce

My son loves to nosh on pasta, my husband is a fan of meat and this recipe takes less than 30 minutes to prepare, which makes this dinner a win win for the whole family! This recipe is great way to sneak in whole grain pasta because the sauce is thick and flavorful and will cover up the taste if your kids are not fans of the healthier carb.

Ingredients: 1 box of rotini pasta 1 onion, diced 3 cloves garlic, diced 1 red pepper, cut into strips 1 lb. ground beef 1 can of diced tomatoes 1 small can of tomato sauce 1/4 cup ketchup 1/4 cup of sugar 2 tsp each of salt, pepper, paprika, garlic and oregano.

Directions:

Prepare pasta as directed on box. While the pasta cooks, fry up the onions and garlic in a pan. Once golden add the strips of pepper. Cook until soft and tender. Then add the beef and brown until no longer red. Once that has cooked add the can of diced tomatoes and the tomato sauce, the ketchup, the sugar and spice with: salt, pepper, paprika, garlic and oregano. (I sprinkle in about 2 teaspoons each and taste to see if more is needed) Let it simmer for about 5 minutes then combine with pasta.

Crunchy BBQ Chicken Fingers

The best way to get your kids to finish their dinner is to serve them something they can eat with their hands! When I want something crunchy and fast, this is the dinner I will make. Everyone loves it and it’s great as leftovers the next day for chicken salad or served in a sandwich.

Ingredients: Boneless chicken breasts cut into strips 1/2 cup of mayo 1/2 cup of BBQ sauce Flavored bread crumbs (I use Pereg’s Mexican flavored bread crumbs)

Directions:

Combine the mayo and the BBQ sauce in a large bowl. Dip the chicken strips into the mixture, then coat with the bread crumbs. Arrange the chicken strips onto a baking sheet and bake covered on 350 for about 45 minutes or until cooked. This can be served with mashed potatoes or rice and couscous. Add a veggie such a broccoli or corn and you are all set!

 

Tuna Noodle Casserole:

Lately my husband has been craving his mom’s tuna casserole. Since my son is a fan of pasta, I figured I would make both the men in my life happy by surprising them with this dish for dinner! My sister-in-law Sarrit and I experimented with my mother-in-law’s original recipe until we came up with this version that is the definition of comfort food at its best.

 

Ingredients:

1 bag wide noodles, boiled and drained according to package directions

Wonder Detergent

Thursday, September 16th, 2010

Last week, I bought a new brand of detergent.

 

It promises to remove all stains, even those stubborn, impossible to remove ones–or your money back. Guaranteed.

 

Amazing, huh?

 

I couldn’t even wait to get a stain, to try it out. And with a family of a bunch of kids, I didn’t have to wait very long.

 

You know what? It really does work wonders. Chocolate, grass, even lipstick-it takes them all out. Effortlessly.

 

But after a few washes, I noticed something else about my wonder detergent. As good as a job as it does, it also dulls the color. The shirts are no longer as bright. They look kind of worn out. Used.

 

             I guess I shouldn’t have expected more.

 

But imagine if you could find a detergent that at the same time as it removes the stains, also makes the colors look brighter, more prominent. And better yet, even makes the fabric look newer, not worn, but stronger, improving the texture of the material. Not only as good as new-but even better!

 

            Impossible? Probably.

 

But there is a wonder gift that G-d gave our world.

 

It’s got a brand name called teshuvah, repentance. Not only does teshuvah remove the stain of sin from the fabric of our souls, it actually makes our souls sparkle even brighter. By making us aware of how stained we’ve become it propels us to invest more energy and effort into strengthening our bond and connection with G-d. And that makes us look even better than ever.

 

Imagine going through the wash cycle, and coming out looking even newer and brighter. Sounds too good to be true?

 

Now there’s something to package.

Wonder Detergent

Thursday, September 16th, 2010

Last week, I bought a new brand of detergent.

 

It promises to remove all stains, even those stubborn, impossible to remove ones–or your money back. Guaranteed.

 

Amazing, huh?

 

I couldn’t even wait to get a stain, to try it out. And with a family of a bunch of kids, I didn’t have to wait very long.

 

You know what? It really does work wonders. Chocolate, grass, even lipstick-it takes them all out. Effortlessly.

 

But after a few washes, I noticed something else about my wonder detergent. As good as a job as it does, it also dulls the color. The shirts are no longer as bright. They look kind of worn out. Used.

 

             I guess I shouldn’t have expected more.

 

But imagine if you could find a detergent that at the same time as it removes the stains, also makes the colors look brighter, more prominent. And better yet, even makes the fabric look newer, not worn, but stronger, improving the texture of the material. Not only as good as new-but even better!

 

            Impossible? Probably.

 

But there is a wonder gift that G-d gave our world.

 

It’s got a brand name called teshuvah, repentance. Not only does teshuvah remove the stain of sin from the fabric of our souls, it actually makes our souls sparkle even brighter. By making us aware of how stained we’ve become it propels us to invest more energy and effort into strengthening our bond and connection with G-d. And that makes us look even better than ever.

 

Imagine going through the wash cycle, and coming out looking even newer and brighter. Sounds too good to be true?

 

Now there’s something to package.

Tampering With Traditional Fare

Wednesday, June 2nd, 2010

I sometimes — ok, often — envy my friends who cook daring, exotic dishes and throw crazy things like fruit into veggie salads.  Innovative stuff like that doesn’t go over so well in my house.  I can prepare it, but Hubby will stare down at the unfamiliar thing on his plate with suspicious distaste.  He’s a creature of habit, even more so a creature of tradition.  Not only does he want to eat the same things, he wants it prepared in the most traditional way.  To him, it’s not really Shabbos without classic gefilte fish and chicken soup.  And even when its 99 degrees outside, steaming hot cholent and potato kugel better be on the menu. 

 

 Defending this bias with his favorite phrase “well, that’s how I had it growing up ” he will insist on chopped liver, even when there are a dozen other sides on the table.  Garden salad should be served sans dressing, with multiple bottled dressings standing alongside the salad bowl ‘cuz, “that’s how I had it growing up “  (Never mind that whenI was growing up, bottles on the table were worse than elbows.)  Even the salad itself should be boring, made with iceberg lettuce.  ICEBERG!  No colorful fruit slices, exotic greens, toasted nuts or onions of any color except white, in this nostalgic salad of his childhood. 

 

Listen, I will gladly love and honor Hubby forever, but I go off when he begs for gefilte fish out of a jar, because .  Granted, he prefers my homemade version – as long as it’s plated exactly the same way as it was when he was growing up – but those jellied fishballs are his unerring default.  To tell the truth, I developed my own addiction to the taste — especially to the jelly itself – but eventually it seemed just too easy.  My grandmother probably went fishing herself for the carp or whatever fish you use to make gefilte fish from scratch; how can I just open a jar?  Yet when I was a new bride – and all thumbs in the kitchen — I stocked up on this wondrous stuff, knowing that it could last unrefrigerated in my pantry until our 50th wedding anniversary.  When friends and relatives would come over to our apartment, Hubby would say, “You have to see this,” and show off our cupboard filled like an aquarium with jars of gefilte fish.  Go figure. 

 

But ever since I learned to cook, I got restless.  More than restless, I got gutsy.  I wanna try new tastes, new ingredients, unusual combinations. 

 

Here is a recipe that takes conventional fare — and adds a few surprises!

 

 

Beef Sukiyaki with Noodles

 

The name says it all!  As far from standard kosher cooking as you can get.  Bring it on!

 

This recipe is adapted from Food & Wine magazine. It called for sake, a traditional Japanese wine fermented from rice; I substituted white wine, as it is hard to find kosher sake.

 

Prep: 9 min, Cook: 15 min, Yield: 8 servings

 

Ingredients:

1 cup soy sauce 1/2 cup white wine 1/2 cup seasoned rice vinegar 4 tablespoons sugar 2 pounds pepper steak strips 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided 2 medium onions, sliced 5 scallions, sliced 1 (6-ounce) package sliced portobello mushrooms 1 (7-ounce) package baby spinach leaves 1 (16-ounce) box fettuccine, cooked according to package directions

 

Preparation:

Mix soy sauce, wine, vinegar and sugar in a small bowl until sugar dissolves; set aside.

Rinse pepper steak and pat dry.

Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a large, deep skillet over medium heat. Add pepper steak and saut? for 2 to 4 minutes, until almost cooked through. Remove from skillet and set aside.

Add remaining oil to skillet and saut? onions, scallions and mushrooms for 5 minutes.

Add spinach and cook for 1 minute, until wilted.

Return pepper steak to skillet with vegetables and add 3/4 of the soy sauce mixture. Bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, for 1 minute.

Place meat and vegetable mixture in a large warm serving bowl. Add fettuccine and toss. Drizzle with remaining soy mixture before serving.

 

Tips:

The word yaki means “saute” or “grill” in Japanese. The best beef for sukiyaki is a cut that has lots of fat but is still very tender. For a splurge, ask your butcher to slice top chuck French roast into pepper steak-like strips.

Always Room On The Shabbos Table

Wednesday, November 25th, 2009

It’s time for the next chapter in the re-education of kosher cooks. First came correctly pronouncing quinoa, incorporating edamame into salads and soups, and who can forget the strawberry mango salad? Now, there is a mass of new recipes available with the introduction of Kolatin, a parve bovine-based, kosher gelatin. Espresso panna cotta, here we come.

 

            Luckily, the doyenne of kosher cooking herself is here to help. Susie Fishbein, the supremely popular author of the Kosher By Design cookbooks, has developed new recipes that incorporate gelatin into desserts, centerpieces and even berry sparklers. Some of the recipes will be available in her upcoming cookbook, Kosher By Design Teens in the Kitchen.

 

            One of Ms. Fishbein’s recipes, tropical coconut pudding parfait, will be included on the first consumer package of Kolatin. Ms. Fishbein describes the dessert as “a really lovely coconut pudding layered with mango and graham cracker crumbs.” “Because you can layer this product,” she adds, “the presentation values are just stunning.”

 

 Other recipes include triple chocolate mousse pie and the aforementioned espresso panna cotta.

 

            This is not your grandmother’s Jell-o. “I was introduced to gelatin in the past,” noted Ms. Fishbein, “but I never used it because the results were not up to par. They didn’t have holding power and you want the shimmer. Once I got my hands on this, it opened up a world of possibilities to me of recipes I never developed before.” We’re talking no-bake cheesecake. 

 

            Using an advance sample of Kolatin, I made both a basic marshmallow recipe (designspongeonline.com), as well as Ms. Fishbein’s triple chocolate mousse pie. Both were delicious and neither required the oven. The mousse pie, in particular, was decadent and a fantastic recipe for the chocoholics in your life. The name comes from the three layers of chocolate-the crust, the mousse and an additional layer of melted semi-sweet chocolate that adds a deep and gooey texture to the dessert. The recipe is dairy and it tastes like it.

 

            Gelatin-based foods and desserts, in particular, are great recipes to make with children and teens. There is, in fact, a gelatin recipe in Kosher By Design Teens in the Kitchen. According to Ms. Fishbein, the recipe is a variation on a traditional Jell-o sparkler, “where you take the berry sparkler and make it more upscale or healthier using fruit juices that are high in antioxidants,” pomegranate or blueberry juice, for example. Cooking with children (and teens) is generally a great way to expose them to new foods and get them more involved in what they eat.

 

For all of you one-pot cooks, I should warn you, that both recipes I tried necessitate a few steps as well as bowls and dishes.

 

            That’s the thing of gelatin. Its magic takes time; not much time – five minutes will do.


 

* * * * *

 


The accompanying recipe – excerpted from the Kosher By Design Supplement introducing Kolatin Kosher Gelatin by Susie Fishbein with Tish Boyle and exclusive photos by John Uher – is printed with permission of Glatech Productions. Learn more about kosher gelatin and get exclusive recipes at koshergelatin.com.


 

 

Triple Chocolate Mousse Pie

By Susie Fishbein


 


 


Dairy


Makes 8-10 servings


Hands on time: 10 minutes


Chill time: 3 hours


 


Here’s a no-bake pie that will thrill the chocolate lovers in your life. It is exceptionally easy to prepare, and makes a dramatic presentation at a party. Serve it with additional whipped cream, if you like.


 


Ingredients:


6 ounces semisweet good quality chocolate bars, finely chopped


2 cups (16-ounces) heavy cream, divided


1/3 cup sugar


1 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder

Rochelle Rothman’s Freezer Tips

Wednesday, August 26th, 2009

Easy Summer Recipes And Tips


 


Marinating



  1. Marinades do not need to totally cover the food.  Allow ¼ to ½ cup of marinade for every 1-2 pounds of food.

  2. Marinade fish for not more than one hour.  Any more than that and the acidity of the marinade will begin to break down the texture of the fish. 

  3. Always discard marinade in which raw meat has been soaking.  Do not use it for basting.  If you want to have some for basting or dipping, make extra or take off some before you pour it over the meat. 

  4. Marinade chicken (boneless) for 1-2 hours, chicken (bone-in) 1 hour to overnight, and vegetables 30-60 minutes.

  5. Marinating any food is a breeze when you have the Tupperware Seasonserve container. You just place your food in, add your marinade and flip it over several times while the food absorbs all the flavors.

  


Easy Creamy Potato Soup


An easy creamy soup is welcome on most summer menus.  Try the following recipe for a quick lunch with a sandwich or add it to your dinner menu.   


 


Ingredients


2 potatoes, peeled and cubed               


3 squash, peeled and cubed


1 clove garlic, crushed


1 onion, diced


1 tbsp. olive oil


Salt and pepper to taste


 


Sauté fresh onion and garlic in oil. Add squash and potatoes to pot; add water to cover.  Cook for 20 to 30 minutes until vegetables are soft.  Use hand blender to puree soup in pot for creamy effect.  Serve hot with sprinkling of croutons or garlic bread. 


 


Winter Watermelon  


This dessert puts a different spin on watermelon.  It is a fun dessert to prepare and serve.  You will enjoy the compliments your guests will bestow upon you after eating this refreshing concoction!


 


Ingredients


½  gallon lime sherbet


½  gallon raspberry sherbet (or strawberry)


¾  -1 cup raisins or mini chocolate chips


 


         Allow the lime sherbet to become soft enough to be smoothed into a Tupperware bowl as to form rind of watermelon.  Put into freezer as you soften and stir up raspberry sherbet with raisins or mini chocolate chips to make inside of watermelon.  Pour into “rind” and smooth over top.  Place seal on container and freeze overnight or until very hard.  Hold bowl in your hands until it comes out of the container.  Slice down from bottom to make halves, slice into thin slices or quarters for serving so that it looks like a watermelon.


 


Summer Pops


Pour mixture into molds.  Seal with sticks and seals.  Freeze at 0 degrees or colder for 3 hours or more.  Hold molds under warm water for a few seconds to loosen pops.


Here are several recipes for you to try. Some of them are dairy, but you can use pareve substitutions.


 



  • 1 can fruit cocktail – place in blender, liquid and all, blend and put in molds.

  • Any flavor instant pudding – use package directions and pour into molds before it sets.

  • Dreamsicles – 1 20oz. bottle orange soda, one 14 oz. can of sweetened condensed milk. Mix together and put in molds. (This recipe can also be made with root beer instead of orange soda, too)

  • Frozen Purple Cow – Whisk 1 cup milk with ¾ cup grape juice, ¼ cup sugar and ¼ cup lemon juice. Pour into molds and freeze. Only 62 calories per pop!

  • Butterscotchcicles – 1 package butterscotch instant pudding, 1 cup root beer, 1 ½ cups water.  Mix and pour into molds and freeze.

  • Punch and Cream – 1 cup Hawaiian Punch, 1 cup ice cream.  Mix together and pour into mold and freeze.

TIP: Put a terrycloth sweatband on a child’s wrist while eating any kind of ices and the wristband will catch all the drips.  Then just toss it into the washing machine.  (The wristband that is, not the child!)


 


 


Over 550 recipes and tips are featured in Rochelle’s humorous and entertaining cookbook, NOT JUST A COOKBOOK.  It also features many “multi-ethnic” recipes that were adapted for the kosher cook.  Rochelle’s book examines food around the year by month. What a GREAT gift!  Check out www.notjustacookbook.com for FREE recipes and to order your copy online, or call 718-258-0415 for store information.  Rochelle is available for cooking demo events for fundraisers as well as Tupperware demonstrations and Custom Kitchen planning with Tupperware Modular Mates.   Call to find out about the SUPER SALES for August thru September!  SUMMER COOKBOOK SALE-BUY 6 get 1 FREE!!

Avoiding Taxes, At All Costs?

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009

 I was recently traveling across the United States/Canadian Border. As soon as people heard I would be traveling that way, my phone began ringing off the hook. Friends, and even strangers, called me to ask if I would take packages for them. From a favorite food for someone’s daughter, baby clothes for a new grandchild, to a much loved breakfast cereal; the requests came pouring in. But what astounded me the most was the requests from people I didn’t know asking me to take jewelry. One person asked if I would take a diamond ring to her son so he could propose. She wanted to send it with me so that it would not be held up for taxes.

 

 I couldn’t help but wonder how the stranger could know I was an honest person and actually trust me to deliver the ring. And then I thought about all these packages I was being asked to take and wondered if they indeed contained what the people told me they did. Forget about them trusting me. The real question was could I trust them?

 

            There are many reasons I do not take packages for people when I travel. I am still astounded that so many people do, even from strangers. Every few months we read another story about someone being arrested for unknowingly smuggling drugs hidden in cans of coffee, birthday cakes, or suitcases. We are all fair game to the unscrupulous or the addicted whether we are close relatives or have never seen this person before. So many innocent people are serving time in prison for helping a friend or a stranger. 

 

So, how can we teach our children (and even ourselves) to maintain a high level of chesed, to be willing to run and do for another, while at the same time staying safe in a world filled with danger? How can we learn to tell the difference between chesed and exploitation?

 

            This is what I would like to suggest as a partial solution to the problem. It may not help in all situations, but I think in most cases it can be effective.  It’s simply to follow a strict adherence to halacha. 

 

 People are asked to take packages for others for a variety of reasons. For some the packages are a way of sending their love. For others it is a way of avoiding taxes. Most of us have come to see cheating the taxman as a positive thing. But in reality it is simply geneiva, theft. The Torah instructs us to obey the laws of the land we live in. Like it or not, taxes are part and parcel of those rules. We need to teach our children, and realize ourselves, that helping someone avoid taxes is simply not kosher. If we are able to get this message through to our children then they will readily refuse to take the diamonds (so a friend can avoid taxes) that turn out to be drugs or the artifact (with the high tax rate) that is filled with Ecstasy or jewelry etc. They will deny the request as quickly as they would deny a suggestion that they rob the local store because they will see them both as theft, which indeed is exactly what they are.

 

 But what of the other items we are asked to deliver – the gift to a daughter living in a different city or the toy to a grandchild or the sealed package for a friend’s birthday. Emes, truth, is our protection in these cases. Simply ask the person to write their own name and address on the package and then be truthful at the border, telling the guard that you are taking a package for this person and you did not pack it yourself. Ask the sender to leave the package open so you can examine it and know what it contains so you can be honest at the border when asked what you are carrying. Anyone, stranger or friend, who declines your request and wants you to lie for them, can just use the mail services.

 

 I am not naive enough to think that this will solve the whole problem. Unscrupulous people will still find ways to take advantage of our children’s and our own innocence and lack of experience. But being meticulously honest and truthful in all our dealings, both within our community and outside it, being extra careful in our halachic observance can only add to our own well-being and safety. The closer we strive to meet the ideals of Hashem’s Torah, the more we infuse ourselves and teach our children to be thoroughly honest and truthful in all our dealings, in business and life, the more protected we will be.


 


You can reach me at annnovick@hotmail.com

Why Should I Suffer?

Wednesday, November 19th, 2008

      There is a great scene in “Fiddler On The Roof” where a donor gives a beggar one kopek.

 

     “Why only one kopek?” asks the beggar.

 

      “I had a bad week,” replies the donor.

 

      “If you had a bad week,” responds the beggar, “why should I have to suffer?”

 

        Unfortunately, that is the situation for many charities in Israel. They are having a very difficult time, and this may not be the best time to allow them to suffer.

 

     Some organizations are just too special to be allowed to flounder. I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Mrs. Barbara Silverman, the founder and spirit behind “A Package from Home.” Mrs. Silverman sends packages to Israeli soldiers serving in the fighting units guarding Israel.  

 

   The conditions under which our soldiers operate are usually not ideal because of the heat in the summer and the cold in the winter. Standing guard while isolated from their families and loved ones is often very difficult. A warm and cuddly “Package from Home” can lift their spirits and generate a smile.

 

     Barbara tells a story related to her by a group commander. His fairly new recruits were the soldiers closest to a terrorist bus attack where several children were maimed and murdered. His boys were sent to protect the survivors and help clean up the mess. The commander related how dejected the boys were as they returned to the base. After a very quiet review of the incident (every action is reviewed immediately after it is completed), the boys walked very slowly, heads down, and with great sadness in their eyes.

 

     They did not rush off to shower and eat, as they usually did, but rather came into their bunk where all of the beds were lined up in a neat row, and sat on their beds in silence. They did not even bother to turn on the lights. Their commander stood by the door watching, not knowing what to say.

 

    Suddenly, he noticed that there was a wrapped package on each bed. He remembered that he had recently approved a request by Barbara Silverman to send each soldier in the unit a package, but the boys did not seem to pay attention to what was on their beds. One boy eventually did notice and opened his package, smiled and said, “Guys, listen to this. `My name is Dvora and I go to a Jewish day school in Manhattan, N.Y. My friends tell me that I am pretty and I am 16 years old. Do you have a girlfriend?’”

 

     That broke the sad mood, and the soldiers suddenly relaxed, took a deep breath, and started opening the packages, eating the candy, and reading the letters.

 

    The officer mentioned the incident at a commander’s meeting, and many officers started calling Barbara to ask for packages for their troops.

 

    Today, unfortunately, the donations to “A Package from Home” have dried up. People who used to donate $500 every few months are sending $25 checks. Barbara, at age 78, was told not to bother to come to the USA on a fund-raising mission because no one is giving. The rockets are still hitting Sderot and our young boys are still out there guarding the country, but very few packages are being sent out.

 

    Barbara began “A Package from Home” in her living room with a mailing of 25 packages. The organization has expanded, and more than 135,000 packages have been sent to Israeli soldiers over the past eight years. Barbara feels that her mission is to strengthen the spirit and resolve of each Israeli combat soldier, and to show them our appreciation for the sacrifices they are making in securing our safety and the survival of the Jewish People.

 

    The care packages are not only a warm reminder of our love and esteem for our young men and women, but they also contain items that they truly can use.

 

     There are many ways that people have donated to “A Package from Home.” Children in schools and shul youth groups have written letters in Hebrew, English, Russian or Amharic and collected funds to adopt a fighting unit. A family might come to Israel to celebrate a Bar/Bat Mitzvah and the boy or girl would decide that part of the gift funds should go to “A Package from Home.” In addition to monetary donations, the family might bring small items in large suitcases.

 

     The following items are especially appreciated: toothpaste, toothbrushes, two-piece long underwear sets in size medium and large, cotton boxer shorts in medium and large, deodorant (non- aerosol), soap, shampoo, individual bags of M&M’s and Mike & Ike candy. Also appreciated are men’s round neck, short sleeve, navy, black, brown, white and khaki T-shirts in size medium and large, sun screen, medicated foot powder, lip balm, and J&J Compeed – medicated especially for blisters.

 

     A tourist family might even decide to come help “do a packing.” After the packing, the family members usually have the opportunity to meet several of the soldiers who come to pick up the packages for their unit.

 

    If you would like more information about “A Package From Home” please check their beautiful website at http://www.apackagefromhome.org/.

 

   American checks (donations over $ 250 will receive a tax-deductible receipt) can be mailed to: Naomi Eisenberger, The Good People Fund, 384 Wyoming Ave, Milburn, NJ 07041.

 

    Checks should be made payable to “The Good People Fund” with a notation that it is slated for “A Package from Home Project” (at the bottom of the check please write “A Package From Home”).

 

    The Good People Fund accepts credit cards for U.S. tax-deductible contributions. Online donations may be made at www.goodpeoplefund.org. Barbara’s email is emess@netvision.net.il.

 

    Please help give fighting units a smile!! ?

 

    Comments may be sent to dov@gilor.com  

 

 

 

 

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/columns//2008/11/19/

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