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July 29, 2015 / 13 Av, 5775
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Parshas Re’eh


Weekly Luach - Shabbat Shalom

Vol. LXIV No. 31 5773
New York City
CANDLE LIGHTING TIME
August 2, 2013 – 26 Av 5773
7:50 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

Sabbath Ends: 8:55 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sabbath Ends: Rabbenu Tam 9:21 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Weekly Reading: Re’eh
Weekly Haftara: Aniya So’ara (Isaiah 54:11-55:5)
Daf Yomi: Pesachim 43
Mishna Yomit: Sanhedrin 11:6 – Makos 1:1
Halacha Yomit: Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 288:2-4
Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Me’ilah chap. 8 – Hilchos Korban Pesach chap. 2
Earliest time for Tallis and Tefillin: 4:55 a.m. NYC E.D.T
Sunrise: 5:48 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Latest Kerias Shema: 9:29 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sunset: 8:09 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Pirkei Avos: 6

This Shabbos is Shabbos Mevarchim and we bless the New Moon. Rosh Chodesh Elul is 2 days, Tuesday and Wednesday. The molad is Tuesday evening, 2 minutes and 1 chelek (a chelek is 1/18th of a minute) past 10:00 p.m. (in Jerusalem).

Shabbos: All tefillos as usual, but we are not mazkir neshamos, nor do we say Av HaRachamim.

Rosh Chodesh Elul (first day) starts Monday evening.

Maariv: we add Ya’aleh VeYavo; if one forgot to say Ya’aleh VeYavo, at Maariv only, one does not repeat. (See Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 422:1 – based on Berachos 30b – which explains this as due to the fact that we do not sanctify the new month at night, and this rule applies even when Rosh Chodesh is two days).

Tuesday morning Shacharis: usual tefilla with inclusion of Ya’aleh VeYavo in the Shemoneh Esreh, half-Hallel, Kaddish Tiskabbel. We take out one Torah scroll from the Ark. We read in Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:1-15), we call four Aliyos (Kohen, Levi, Yisrael, Yisrael), the ba’al keriah recites half-Kaddish. We return the Torah to the Aron, Ashrei, U’va LeTziyyon – we delete La’menatze’ach. Chazzan says half-Kaddish, all then remove their tefillin.

Mussaf of Rosh Chodesh, followed by Chazzan’s repetition and Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu, Shir Shel Yom, Borchi Nafshi and their respective Kaddish recitations (for mourners). Nusach Sefarad say Shir Shel Yom and Borchi Nafshi after half-Hallel. Before Aleinu they add Ein Ke’Elokeinu with Kaddish DeRabbanan.

Mincha: In the Shemoneh Esreh we say Ya’aleh VeYavo, followed by Chazzan’s repetition and Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu and Mourner’s Kaddish.

Birkas Hamazon: In the Grace after Meals we add Ya’aleh VeYavo, as well as mention of Rosh Chodesh in Beracha Acharona (Me’ein Shalosh) at all times.

Tuesday eve. and Wednesday, 2nd day Rosh Chodesh, the order of the day is the same as yesterday. We also begin in the morning after Shacharis (after Shir Shel Yom) and then again in the evening after Maariv to say the psalm Mizmor LeDavid Hashem Ori. Nusach Sefarad say it after Mincha. This morning we also start the blowing of the shofar.

The Sefardic – Spanish, Portuguese, Mediterranean and Oriental – communities also start the recital of Selichos on the 2nd day of Rosh Chodesh. Ashkenazim wait (this year) for the Saturday night (after midnight) immediately before Rosh Hashana. All continue saying Selichos through erev Yom Kippur. Kiddush Levana at first opportunity (we usually wait until Motza’ei Shabbos).

The following chapters of Tehillim are being recited by many congregations and Yeshivos for our brothers and sisters in Eretz Yisrael: Chapters 83, 130, 142. – Y.K.

About the Author: Rabbi Yaakov Klass, rav of Congregation K’hal Bnei Matisyahu in Flatbush, Brooklyn, is Torah Editor of The Jewish Press. He can be contacted at yklass@jewishpress.com.


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