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August 31, 2015 / 16 Elul, 5775
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A Life with Autism


Nechama has high hopes for Shalom’s future. He shows high intelligence, including excellent problem-solving skills, and proficiency in math, reading, music and computers. Even though he may never function well in a traditional classroom environment, she believes he will have many options as he grows older.

Today, adults with autism like Temple Grandin and Stephen Shore, who have found the fulfillment that comes with independence and a successful career or family of their own, are still much too rare. In 10 or 15 years, there will be millions more maturing young adults with autism facing a crossroads in their lives, like Aaron Winston did. The challenge for society is to provide more programs like the nonPareil Institute which enable them to develop their intelligence and innate skills and take them as far as they can go.

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