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September 18, 2014 / 23 Elul, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘neighborhood’

A Cold Dip in Mei Neftoach

Tuesday, July 24th, 2012

These three Haredi boys have the right idea about temperature management. Just jump in the water and stay there until it’s safe to come out again – say, before Rosh Hashanah.

At least I think they’re Haredi, because one of them has lost control of his earlocks which are flying on either side of his head. But maybe by now boys of all manner of Orthodox Judaism have started to grow payas. See, normally we tell by their yarmulkas…

The pool they just jumped into is in an old Jewish village which is mentioned in the Book of Joshua, Mei Neftoach. In 1948 there was an Arab village here, named Lifta, on the outskirts of Jerusalem. The Arab population fled during Israel’s War of Independence, when the Jordanian Legion lay siege to the Jewish neighborhoods of Jerusalem and Jewish units were attempting to break through this area with supplies for the starved city.

The village, which remained intact, sits on a hillside between the main entrance to Jerusalem and the neighborhood of Romema. In 2012, plans to rebuild the village as an upscale neighborhood were rejected by the Jerusalem District Court.

Good looking pool, though.

 

NYPD Increasing Protection of Jewish Sites After Bulgarian Bombing

Thursday, July 19th, 2012

The New York City Police Department is stepping up its presence at synagogues and in Jewish neighborhoods the wake of yesterday’s deadly bus bombing in Bulgaria, reports NY1.

The website cites NYPD officials who say that critical response vehicles have been re-deployed as a precaution.

Residents of the Upper East Side told NY1 Thursday morning that increased police presence has become a routine sight.

“I think there’s usually a very large police presence in this neighborhood anyway, so I didn’t really notice that much of a difference. I mean, I do notice sometimes that they’re more here than in others, there’s more of a presence, but I think it’s to be expected,” said an Upper East Side local.

The NYPD says there are no specific threats against the city.

City police took similar precautions in March, after three children and a rabbi were gunned down in Toulouse, France.

Mosque’s Loud Prayer Generates Mega-Decibel ‘Battle of the Bands’

Monday, July 16th, 2012

After the French Hill neighborhood of Jerusalem has decided to play very loud music, in defiance of the volume and disturbance of the sound of the muezzin at the mosque in nearby Al-Issawiya, two additional Jewish neighborhoods, Pisgat Ze’ev and Har Choma, have announced that they, too, will take up a similar approach. French Hill also decided to go with hard rock, and not Mediterranean tunes, as had originally been planned, because, as they put it, hard rock is more likely to deliver the message.

According to Yediot Jerusalem, the French Hill neighborhood has recently approached an amplification company with an order for four huge speakers to be directed at Al-Isawiya. As soon as the village muezzin will start his exceedingly loud prayer, it will be responded to with ear shattering Rock n’ Roll, letting local Arabs understand how disturbing the loud prayers have been to their Jewish neighbors.

Har Choma and Pisgat Ze’ev residents are waiting to see the results from the French Hill “pilot.” If the protest via rock blasts succeeds, the other two neighborhoods, situated on the border of the Jerusalem municipality, will follow suit.

Har Choma residents are coping with the sound of the muezzin from the villages of Umm Tuba and Sur Baher. Pisgat Ze’ev residents receive their 5 daily Muslim inspiration calls from Beit Hanina, Shuafat and Anata.

Jerusalem’s city hall has attempted to negotiated between Al-Issawiya village head Darwish Darwish and the residents of French Hill. Darwish promised to regulate the noise level, but the French Hill residents are saying nothing has changed, and the muezzin call continue to reach unbearable decibels.

The Truth About Cronkite

Wednesday, July 11th, 2012

A new biography of the late Walter Cronkite has forced even admirers of the iconic CBS anchorman to reassess the man long held up as a paragon of journalistic ethics and objectivity.

Newsweek media critic Howard Kurtz, for example, writes that in reading Cronkite, by the historian Douglas Brinkley, he “came to realize that the man who once dominated television journalism was more complicated – and occasionally more unethical – than the legend that surrounds him. Had Cronkite engaged in some of the same questionable conduct today – he secretly bugged a committee room at the 1952 GOP convention – he would have been bashed by the blogs, pilloried by the pundits, and quite possibly ousted by his employer.”

Kurtz also notes that in 1968 Cronkite secretly met with Robert Kennedy and urged him to run in the Democratic primaries that year against President Lyndon Johnson. “Soon afterward,” writes Kurtz, “Cronkite got an exclusive interview in which Kennedy left the door open for a possible run – the very candidacy that the anchor had urged him to undertake. (Kennedy announced three days later.) I am shaking my head at the spectacle of a network anchor secretly urging a politician to mount a White House campaign – and then interviewing him about that very question. This was duplicitous, a major breach of trust.”

It was Cronkite’s good fortune that his heyday came and went in the era prior to the arrival of cable news, talk radio and the Internet. In that far-off time, Americans watching television had to settle for the Big Three networks and a smattering of local stations. There was little recourse for viewers who weren’t comfortable with the narrow worldview promulgated by a relatively small group of liberal middle-aged white men living and working in close proximity to one another within a few square blocks of prime Manhattan real estate – a neighborhood, if one can call it that, as unrepresentative of America as any neighborhood could possibly be.

In such a homogeneous media universe, it was easy for someone like Cronkite to assume that whatever he passed along to Mr. and Mrs. America would be accepted as unvarnished truth, free of any bias or spin.

In the years following his retirement in 1981, Cronkite revealed himself to be the liberal many of his critics always suspected him of being, which was his right, of course, but it does raise questions about the slant and emphasis he brought to the job when putting together newscasts in the tumultuous Vietnam/Watergate years.

Cronkite also revealed a daffy side, as when he responded to a question from Esquire magazine in 2006 about whether Oprah Winfrey would make a good president. “Well, apparently so,” he responded. “She seems to have an understanding of our problems. A great deal of that probably comes from being African-American and suffering the indignities of that. And se certainly has shown that she has a literate approach to solving problems. So I’d like to think she’d make a good president”

This is the same Cronkite who, when a new videotape from Osama bin Laden surfaced a few days before the 2004 presidential election, saw it as some nefarious plot hatched in the bowels of the Bush White House. Appearing on CNN’s “Larry King Live” on the Friday immediately preceding the election, Uncle Walter formally linked hands with the nuttiest of conspiracy-mongers:

“So now,” Cronkite told King, “the question is, basically, right now, how will this affect the election? And I have a feeling that it could tilt the election a bit. In fact, I’m inclined to think that Karl Rove, the political manger of the White House, who is a very clever man, that he probably set up bin Laden to this thing.”

So it was all a Karl Rove production, according to the Crank named Cronkite. Can you picture the scenario? Karl Rove, anxiously pondering the latest tracking polls, puts in a call to bin Laden, hiding in a cave somewhere in scenic Afghanistan, and asks him to give Bush a boost by releasing a video.

That’s the way it was, apparently, inside the mind of one of the most undeservedly over-hyped men of his generation.

Tragic Ulpana Hill Evacuation Conducted in Orderly Fashion

Tuesday, June 26th, 2012

The morning of the evacuation of Ulpana Hill opened with a mass Shachrit prayer of local residents, led by Rabbi Zalman Melamed, facing the settlement of Beit El.

Some residents wearing black shirts that read “Ulpana Hill, we shall return,” held an impromptu press conference. “This is a black day for Israel,” one resident said.

Didi Dickstein told Maariv: “This is our home. It’s hard to leave home.” He announced that he would passively resist the move. “It’s a very difficult day for neighborhood residents,” he added in a pained voice. “This is a happy neighborhood, alive and full of life, which is going to be destroyed.”

Dickstein emphasized that he and his neighbors have decided to leave without violence, according to Rabbi Melamed’s instructions, but he noted that “they made us leave, we do not leave willingly, I personally do not feel I can be a partner in the evacuation. Let them come and get me.”

Meanwhile, preparations for the neighborhood evacuation are already underway. Eight trucks were hired by the Ministry of Defense to move 16 families from their homes, half of them Tuesday morning and the rest in the afternoon.

Contractors hired by the Defense Ministry have arrived and are now helping residents to pack up equipment for transfer later.

Residents who lived in the five buildings slated to be demolished, are on schedule to be moved to the site of trailer “villas” known as Caravillas which was established for them in an empty military base.

By government order, to the extent possible, the evacuation will be conducted without the presence of children.

Shopping with my Dog

Sunday, June 24th, 2012

Young woman and her dog out shopping in the Florentin neighborhood in South Tel-Aviv.

The Florentine neighborhood in south Tel-Aviv was established years ago by the newcomers from Greece and Turkey. It was planned as a simple and pretty neighborhood, but it quickly sank into poverty and neglect.

Today the neighborhood attracts many foreign workers, legal and otherwise, as well as young students, all of whom like the low rents.  The city has been investing in the neighborhood’s infrastructure and in education, but the neighborhood remains rundown.

Despite this, during the day it is a busy and vibrant place where people flock to buy furniture and fabrics, or visit the Levinsky Market.

(From Tel-Aviv Guide)

‘This is the Torah’

Wednesday, June 20th, 2012

Hundreds of Jewish men taking part in a mass prayer on a street of the Ulpana neighborhood in Beit El.

Negotiations over the fate of the neighborhood are in full swing, with the government looking for quiet removal of residents over a dubious High Court order. The final decision on how residents will act rests on the shoulders of the dean of Beit El’s yeshiva, Rabbi Zalman Melamed.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/photos/this-is-the-torah/2012/06/20/

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