web analytics
August 31, 2014 / 5 Elul, 5774
At a Glance
Judaism
Sponsored Post
Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat (L) visits the JewishPress.com booth at The Event. And the Winners of the JewishPress.com Raffle Are…

Congratulations to all the winners of the JewishPress.com raffle at The Event



Home » Judaism » Parsha »

For Honor And Glory


Rapps-Rabbi-Joshua-logo

The articles in this column are transcriptions and adaptations of shiurim by Rav Joseph Ber Soloveitchik, zt”l. The Rav’s unique perspective on Chumash permeated many of the shiurim and lectures he presented at various venues over a 40 plus year period. His words add an important perspective that makes the Chumash in particular, and our tradition in general, vibrant and relevant to our generation.

This column is an adaptation and extension of an idea presented by the Rav in a 1956 d’var Torah on the concept of kavod; it is in honor of the wedding of Rabbi Dr. Moshe and Devora Strauch

Parshas Pikudei describes the building of the tabernacle and the weaving and manufacturing of the bigdei kehunah, the unique garments for Aharon and his children, the kohanim. In Parshas Tetzaveh (Exodus 28:2), where the command and blueprint for these garments is given, the Torah adds the words that these garments should be l’kavod u’letiferes, for honor and glory. Let us analyze the concept of kavod, how it relates to the kohen gadol, each Jew and knesses Yisrael.

Just as great people can sink to great depths of defilement if they are not careful, lofty ideals and characteristics can be defiled as well. What are the characteristics of kavod. On the one hand we find that kavod appears to be something to avoid, as it says in Avos (4:28) that pursuit of kavod is one of the traits that remove man from the world. On the other hand we find that Chazal were of the opinion that kavod flees from one who seeks it yet pursues one who avoids it (See Eruvin 13b). There are both positive and negative aspects to kavod.

We find that King David (Psalms 24) ordered the gates to open for the Melech Hakavod. The gates asked who is the Melech Hakavod and he replied Hashem Tzevakos, the true Melech Hakavod. If kavod is an appropriate trait for Hashem, the mitzvah of vehalachta Bidrachav obligates us to emulate Him. To do this we must understand the meaning of kavod.

The root word of kavod, honor or respect, and koved, heavy or difficult, is the same. Hashem tells Moshe “v’ikavdah b’Pharoh” (Exodus 14:17), which the Targum translates as I will be glorified. Others interpret this phrase as I will make it very difficult for Pharaoh and the Egyptians. Both interpretations are appropriate. The will of Hashem was that Pharaoh and the Egyptians must respect and appreciate His greatness. The Egyptians were dragged through the mud of the Red Sea b’kveidus, with strain and pain, which brought them to the realization that Hashem is the One they have been resisting all along. They finally came to appreciate the gravity of Hashem and to respect Him.

The word masa, burden, is one of the many synonyms in the Hebrew language for prophecy. Prophecy, conveying the word of Hashem, is a difficult responsibility. It requires perseverance in the face of strong opposition. It demands an attitude and fortitude to resist the malaise of the people or the outright rejection of Hashem’s message. The messenger, the prophet, must ignore the threat of grave personal physical danger. We find prophets like Yonah who attempted to flee rather than carry the message of Hashem to a potentially dismissive audience. Malachi was given a difficult message to convey, referred to as masa, a burden (Malachi 1:1). It is the job of the prophet to convince the people to honor the Sender of the message as well as to relent and accept His weighty message.

The concept of kavod was also imparted to the human being. The Ramban comments (Genesis 1:26) that man was crowned with kavod and hadar, honor and beauty. Each member of klal Yisrael, indeed all of mankind, has a uniqueness, and individuality, like his Creator, that makes him special and grants him kavod. When one acts in a way that defiles that kavod, one denies and defiles the tzelem Elokim, the image of Hashem in which man is created.

About the Author: Rabbi Joshua Rapps attended the Rav's shiur at RIETS from 1977 through 1981 and is a musmach of Yeshivas Rabbeinu Yitzchak Elchanan. He and his wife Tzipporah live in Edison, N.J. Rabbi Rapps can be contacted at ravtorah1@gmail.com.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “For Honor And Glory”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
US Marines walk a city street in Fallujah, heavily damaged by the fighting. (2004)
Netanyahu Says Making Gaza ‘Israel’s Fallujah’ Was Too High a Price
Latest Judaism Stories
Taste-of-Lomdus-logo

First, how could a beis din of 23 judges present a guilty verdict in a capital punishment case? After all, only a majority of the 23 judges ruled in favor of his verdict.

Of paramount importance is that both the king and his people realize that while he is the leader, he is still a subject of God.

Daf-Yomi-logo

Untimely News
‘A Mourner Is Forbidden To Wear Shoes…’
(Mo’ed Katan 20b)

Questions-Answers-logo

Question: The Gemara in Berachot states that the sages authored our prayers. Does that mean we didn’t pray beforehand?

Menachem
Via Email

When a person feels he can control the destiny of other people, he runs the risk of feeling self-important, significant, and mighty.

Needless to say, it was done and they formed a great relationship as his friend and mentor. He started attending services and volunteered his time all along putting on tefillin.

He took me to a room filled with computer equipment and said, “You pray here for as long as you want.” I couldn’t believe my ears.

On Friday afternoon, Dov called Kalman. “Please make sure to return the keys for the car on Motzaei Shabbos,” he said. “We have a bris on Sunday morning and we’re all going. We also need the roof luggage bag.”

On Chol HaMoed some work is prohibited and some is permitted. According to some opinions, the work prohibition is biblical; according to others, it’s rabbinical.

If there is a mitzvas minuy dayanim in the Diaspora, then why is there a difference between Israel and the Diaspora in the number of judges and their distribution?

Judaism is a religion of love but also a religion of justice, for without justice, love corrupts.

The time immediately preceding Mashiach’s arrival is likened to the birth pangs of a woman in labor.

Eisenhower understood that motivated men will fight much harder and longer than unmotivated men.

Who does not want to get close to Hashem? Yet, how do we do that?

More Articles from Rabbi Joshua Rapps
Rapps-Rabbi-Joshua-logo

If there is a mitzvas minuy dayanim in the Diaspora, then why is there a difference between Israel and the Diaspora in the number of judges and their distribution?

Rapps-Rabbi-Joshua-logo

The first prayer of Moshe was Vayechal, where Moshe’s petition was that no matter how bad bnei Yisrael were, the Egyptians were worse.

Moshe served dual major roles for bnei Yisrael. He was their teacher and their leader.

Moshe’s punishment described in the parsha is most tragic. He was chosen to redeem the people, he loved them dearly and personally sacrificed so much for them.

Scientific disciplines don’t ask “why”, a metaphysical question. They ask “how does it function?”

While Moshe was the most unique prophet, he was also alone.

The multitudes among them experienced a desire for meat and wept.

The Shulchan Aruch notes that a priest who is in mourning for one of the seven close relatives does not bless the people during the Shiva period.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/parsha/for-honor-and-glory/2014/02/27/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: