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May 30, 2015 / 12 Sivan, 5775
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Close For Comfort

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Ages 6-9

Q. Why did Shira feel better after talking with her mom if her grandmother was still far away from her?

A. Although she wasn’t any physically closer to her grandmother, she felt spiritually closer once she realized that she had made many of her Bubbie’s good traits part of her life.

Q. Do you think this feeling of closeness will increase or decrease as time goes on?

A. While it is likely that the passage of time will make certain memories and feelings fade, Shira, if she chooses to, can keep her deep-down sense of her grandmother’s nearness strong, and even grow, the more she appreciates her good traits, and makes them a part of herself.

Ages 10 and up

Q. Is one person really closer to Hashem than someone else?

A. Ultimately, as Hashem created us, and constantly sustains us, we are all as close to him as could be. However our ability to feel and benefit from that closeness depends on our choice of whether to behave in a “G-dly” way, or not. In that sense we become closer to Hashem by acting more like Him.

Q. Can a human being really understand Hashem’s ways in order to emulate them?

A. The Torah is full of teachings that directly or indirectly show us the ways of Hashem, and how He interacts with His creations. While in the absolute sense, we can never fully understand Hashem, He has given us the Torah, to learn from His ways and apply them in our lives, for the betterment of the world.

About the Author: Nesanel Yoel Safran is a published writer and yeshiva cook. He has been studying Torah for the last 25 years, and lives in Israel with his family.


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