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April 17, 2014 / 17 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Preparation Time’

Burekas

Wednesday, June 24th, 2009

These popular little puff pastry parcels are usually filled with potatoes, mushrooms or spinach and cheese.  They can be served as snack, as finger foods at a Shabbos kiddush, or as part of a summer picnic.   They are a genuine Sephardic-Jewish creation, copied by others throughout the Eastern Mediterranean.  They can be served hot or cold; you can prepare them in advance, and then freeze, unbaked.  Just pop them into the oven when needed.

 

Preparation Time: 25 minutes   Cooking Time: 35 minutes

Makes: 20 burekas

 

Potato and Mushroom Burekas

 

For the Filling:

1 pound (approx. 3) potatoes – peeled and roughly chopped

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 onion – peeled and finely chopped

8 ounces fresh mushrooms – finely chopped

1 egg

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

2 pounds puff pastry – ready rolled if possible

2 egg yolks – beaten – to glaze

3 tablespoons sesame seeds

 

Method

1)      Preheat the oven to 400

Roasted Red Pepper and Carrot Soup

Thursday, March 26th, 2009

Soup is one of the best starters for a Seder meal because it is so easy and quick to serve, especially if you have a large crowd at the table. This recipe is a delicious, vibrant and tasty soup, which can be made in advance and uses readily available low-fat Pesach ingredients. Cooked with garlic and basil, it is full of the flavor of the Mediterranean and provides a delightful change from regular carrot soup.

 

Preparation Time: 20 minutes; Cooking Time: 35 minutes plus 10 minutes for cooling.

Serves: 8 people

 

Ingredients

6 large red peppers – cut into quarters, seeds removed

3 tablespoons olive oil

2 onions – peeled and roughly chopped

Large bunch of fresh basil

4 cloves garlic – peeled and finely chopped

6 carrots – peeled and roughly chopped

5 cups vegetable or chicken stock

Pinch of sugar

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

Garnish: Sprigs of basil

 

Method

1. Preheat the broiler to its highest setting.

2. Place the peppers on an oven tray and brush them with olive oil. Broil for about 10 minutes or until the skins have blackened and blistered.

3. Meanwhile, heat the remaining olive oil in a large deep saucepan. Saut? the onions, carrots and garlic for about 5 minutes. Add the stock, pinch of sugar and bring to a boil. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes or until the carrots are soft.

4. Remove the peppers from the broiler and immediately transfer to a dish and cover with plastic wrap. Leave for 10 minutes to cool.

5. Remove the skins from the peppers and roughly chop. Reserve one red pepper for garnish, but add the rest to the soup with the basil.

6. Simmer the soup for a final 5 minutes.

7. Liquidize half the soup to produce a semi-puree consistency. Return to the saucepan. Taste and adjust seasoning.

 

To serve the stylish way: Chop the remaining red pepper and sprinkle over the soup Garnish with sprigs of fresh basil.

Roasted Red Pepper and Carrot Soup

Thursday, March 26th, 2009

Soup is one of the best starters for a Seder meal because it is so easy and quick to serve, especially if you have a large crowd at the table. This recipe is a delicious, vibrant and tasty soup, which can be made in advance and uses readily available low-fat Pesach ingredients. Cooked with garlic and basil, it is full of the flavor of the Mediterranean and provides a delightful change from regular carrot soup.


 


Preparation Time: 20 minutes; Cooking Time: 35 minutes plus 10 minutes for cooling.


Serves: 8 people


 


Ingredients


6 large red peppers – cut into quarters, seeds removed


3 tablespoons olive oil


2 onions – peeled and roughly chopped


Large bunch of fresh basil


4 cloves garlic – peeled and finely chopped


6 carrots – peeled and roughly chopped


5 cups vegetable or chicken stock


Pinch of sugar


Salt and freshly ground black pepper


 


Garnish: Sprigs of basil


 


Method


1. Preheat the broiler to its highest setting.


2. Place the peppers on an oven tray and brush them with olive oil. Broil for about 10 minutes or until the skins have blackened and blistered.


3. Meanwhile, heat the remaining olive oil in a large deep saucepan. Sauté the onions, carrots and garlic for about 5 minutes. Add the stock, pinch of sugar and bring to a boil. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes or until the carrots are soft.


4. Remove the peppers from the broiler and immediately transfer to a dish and cover with plastic wrap. Leave for 10 minutes to cool.


5. Remove the skins from the peppers and roughly chop. Reserve one red pepper for garnish, but add the rest to the soup with the basil.


6. Simmer the soup for a final 5 minutes.


7. Liquidize half the soup to produce a semi-puree consistency. Return to the saucepan. Taste and adjust seasoning.


 


To serve the stylish way: Chop the remaining red pepper and sprinkle over the soup Garnish with sprigs of fresh basil.

Persian Chicken With Mint, Parsley & Dried Fruit

Wednesday, March 18th, 2009

               This colorful Persian Chicken dish with mint, parsley and dried fruit is perfect for Passover as it is easy to prepare and ideal when you have extra guests.  As I use the breast of chicken, there is no carving involved and serving is straightforward. The recipe is cooked in a delicious flavored turmeric stock, so should your Seder go on for longer than expected, the chicken will not dry out. Sephardim would tend to serve it with rice, but in my Ashkenazi household, I serve it with roasted potatoes.

 

Preparation Time: 15 minutes; Cooking Time: 40 minutes; Serves 6

 

Ingredients

1 cup dried apricots cut into strips

1 cup dried cherries or cranberries

1 cup water

3 tablespoons olive oil

2 large onions, chopped

1- 2 teaspoons turmeric

Large bunch of chives – chopped

Large bunch of mint leaves – chopped

Large bunch of parsley – chopped

2 cups chicken stock or water

6 chicken breasts – boneless and skinless cut into 1-1/2-inch chunks

Salt and freshly ground black pepper – to taste

 

Garnish: Flat leaf parsley

 

Method

1. Place dried fruit in medium bowl and cover with water and then cover bowl with plastic film. Place in the microwave for 2 minutes to soften.

2. In a large skillet, heat the oil. Cook onion until soft, about 5 minutes and then stir in turmeric and chicken pieces. Cook over a medium-high heat – about 2 minutes, or until fragrant.

3. Add the stock, bring to a boil and cook about 15 minutes.

4. Add the fruit, soaking liquid, herbs and simmer for a final 15 minutes.

5. Taste and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Persian Chicken With Mint, Parsley & Dried Fruit

Wednesday, March 18th, 2009

               This colorful Persian Chicken dish with mint, parsley and dried fruit is perfect for Passover as it is easy to prepare and ideal when you have extra guests.  As I use the breast of chicken, there is no carving involved and serving is straightforward. The recipe is cooked in a delicious flavored turmeric stock, so should your Seder go on for longer than expected, the chicken will not dry out. Sephardim would tend to serve it with rice, but in my Ashkenazi household, I serve it with roasted potatoes.


 


Preparation Time: 15 minutes; Cooking Time: 40 minutes; Serves 6


 


Ingredients


1 cup dried apricots cut into strips


1 cup dried cherries or cranberries


1 cup water


3 tablespoons olive oil


2 large onions, chopped


1- 2 teaspoons turmeric


Large bunch of chives – chopped


Large bunch of mint leaves – chopped


Large bunch of parsley – chopped


2 cups chicken stock or water


6 chicken breasts – boneless and skinless cut into 1-1/2-inch chunks


Salt and freshly ground black pepper – to taste


 


Garnish: Flat leaf parsley


 


Method


1. Place dried fruit in medium bowl and cover with water and then cover bowl with plastic film. Place in the microwave for 2 minutes to soften.


2. In a large skillet, heat the oil. Cook onion until soft, about 5 minutes and then stir in turmeric and chicken pieces. Cook over a medium-high heat – about 2 minutes, or until fragrant.


3. Add the stock, bring to a boil and cook about 15 minutes.


4. Add the fruit, soaking liquid, herbs and simmer for a final 15 minutes.


5. Taste and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Gazelle Horns

Wednesday, February 25th, 2009

I like to put these pastries in a basket for Purim as they make ideal Mishloach Manot. They transport well and look delightful all wrapped up. They are in fact a very popular Moroccan pastry especially in the street markets of Marrakech. 

 

Though its shape is reminiscent of a crescent, it actually represents a gazelle horn, hence its name. These pastries are always served at celebrations, particularly at wedding banquets. Filled with almond paste and flavored with orange flower water (can be found at specialty shops) they are a pure delight.

 

Preparation Time: 30 minutes; Cooking Time: 20 minutes; Makes: Approximately 35

 

Ingredients:

For pastry

1

Orange Chanukah Dreidel Cookies

Friday, December 19th, 2008

The dreidel is one of the best-known games during Chanukah. This four-sided spinning top has four letters: Shin, Hey, Gimmel and Nun. These letters mean “a great miracle happened there.”  Each letter has a fate, Nun means nothing happens, and the next player spins the dreidel, Gimmel takes all the tokens in the pot, Hey takes half the pot and Shin the player must put one token in the pot.


As well as playing the dreidel game with chocolate Chanukah gelt, why not play with these Chanukah cookies! These delicious dreidel shaped cookies are light and simple to make.  You can shape them using a dreidel cutter (I found some on the internet) but you can make them using a paper template and drawing round that. For an authentic look, you can also pipe a selection of Shin, Hey, Gimmel and Nun Hebrew letters using ready made colored icing. Little helpers will love making these!


To grind the Brazil nuts, place in a food processor for 2-3 minutes until completely ground.


Preparation Time: 20 minutes; Cooking Time: 15 minutes; Makes: 60 cookies


Ingredients
½ cup margarine/unsalted butter
2 tablespoons confectioner’s sugar
1 egg
1 tablespoon grated orange zest
1 cup ground Brazil nuts – ground in a food processor
1 cup all purpose plain flour
¼ teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon almond extract
Topping: Colored icing, colored sprinkles


Method
1. In a food processor, cream together butter or margarine and sugar until light and fluffy.
2. Stir in the egg, orange zest, and ground Brazil nuts.
3. Sift together flour and baking powder. Add to the creamed mixture.
4. Mix well. Stir in almond extract.
5. Preheat the oven to 350º F.
6. Roll out dough 1 inch thick on a lightly floured board.
7. Cut into dreidel shapes or other desired shapes.
8. Bake on a tray lined with non-stick baking parchment paper for 15 minutes.
9. When cool, pipe a selection of Hebrew letters. Can be frozen or stored in an airtight container for up to 4 days.

Orange Chanukah Dreidel Cookies

Friday, December 19th, 2008

The dreidel is one of the best-known games during Chanukah. This four-sided spinning top has four letters: Shin, Hey, Gimmel and Nun. These letters mean “a great miracle happened there.”  Each letter has a fate, Nun means nothing happens, and the next player spins the dreidel, Gimmel takes all the tokens in the pot, Hey takes half the pot and Shin the player must put one token in the pot.

As well as playing the dreidel game with chocolate Chanukah gelt, why not play with these Chanukah cookies! These delicious dreidel shaped cookies are light and simple to make.  You can shape them using a dreidel cutter (I found some on the internet) but you can make them using a paper template and drawing round that. For an authentic look, you can also pipe a selection of Shin, Hey, Gimmel and Nun Hebrew letters using ready made colored icing. Little helpers will love making these!

To grind the Brazil nuts, place in a food processor for 2-3 minutes until completely ground.

Preparation Time: 20 minutes; Cooking Time: 15 minutes; Makes: 60 cookies

Ingredients

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/food//2008/12/19/

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