Photo Credit: Matty Stern / US Embassy in Tel Aviv
Hanukkah menorah at Yeshivat Sderot, created with the Qassam rockets fired from Gaza that exploded nearby

Israelis adapt quickly to the changing conditions of the region, and are nothing if not quick on the uptake. It’s how they survive. In this case, their survival skills are also the way they resume “normal” life as soon as possible — as they did Tuesday night when IDF Home Front Command informed security personnel that the situation was quiet and back to routine.

Residents of the Gaza Belt region were informed by community leaders that conditions had “returned to normal” and that schools are be back in session on Wednesday.

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A notice was sent out to security personnel in the communities of the Sha’ar HaNegev Regional Council district saying that no special instructions are being issued:

“Good evening,
We have now been officially informed that all restrictions on the Gaza envelope have been removed. Tomorrow we are back to normal. Studies in schools and educational systems in the settlements will be conducted as scheduled – including transportation. All institutions and organizations in the Council and in the settlements will operate in a regular format. There are no special instructions for the home front.
With a quiet night’s rest for all of us,
Adi Meiri, Spokeswoman for Sha’ar HaNegev Regional Council”

Likewise, the leaders of Kibbutz Zikim sent out a notice to residents saying, “From this moment on, it’s a full return to routine… Please note that tomorrow is a normal working day.”

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Hana Levi Julian is a Middle East news analyst with a degree in Mass Communication and Journalism from Southern Connecticut State University. A past columnist with The Jewish Press and senior editor at Arutz 7, Ms. Julian has written for Babble.com, Chabad.org and other media outlets, in addition to her years working in broadcast journalism.