web analytics
September 26, 2016 / 23 Elul, 5776
Blogs
Sponsored Post


US Policy on Israel is Stuck in the 1970s

Now that the U.S. is closer to energy independence, importing less oil now than at any time since 1987, the Saudis do not have anywhere near the leverage that they had in 1973.
Dunce

Photo Credit: Yori Yanover

Since 1967 and especially since 1973, U.S. policy has consistently aimed to drive Israel back to 1949 lines. The arguments publicly made for this policy are intended to convince, but I don’t believe are actually the driving force behind it. There is of course the professional dislike of the Jewish state found in the State Department, going back to 1948 and Secretary Marshall and before. But I think there is something more concrete, too.

After the 1973 war, the Arab members of OPEC announced an embargo of oil to the U.S. and other countries they deemed to have supported Israel:

Implementation of the embargo, and the changing nature of oil contracts, set off an upward spiral in oil prices that had global implications. The price of oil per barrel doubled, then quadrupled, leading to increased costs for consumers world-wide and to the potential for budgetary collapse in less stable economies. Since the embargo coincided with a devaluation of the dollar, a global recession appeared imminent. U.S. allies in Europe and Japan had stockpiled oil supplies and thus had a short term cushion, but the longer term possibility of high oil prices and recession created a strong rift within the Atlantic alliance. European nations and Japan sought to disassociate themselves from the U.S. Middle East policy. The United States, which faced growing oil consumption and dwindling domestic reserves and was more reliant on imported oil than ever before, had to negotiate an end to the embargo from a weaker international position. To complicate the situation, OPEC had linked an end to the embargo to successful U.S. efforts to create peace in the Middle East. Needless to say, the U.S. promised to give the Arabs what they wanted, and the embargo was lifted. But since then, we have kept our promise to our Arab “allies,” even as they have less and less influence on the price and supply of oil. Saudi lobbying and influence (directly and via oil companies) have effectively held our feet to the fire.

Now that the U.S. is closer to energy independence, importing less oil now than at any time since 1987 (and more of that from Canada than anywhere else), the Saudis do not have anywhere near the leverage that they had in 1973.

Why don’t our policies reflect this?

Visit Fresno Zionism.

Vic Rosenthal

About the Author: Vic Rosenthal created FresnoZionism.org to provide a forum for publishing and discussing issues about Israel and the Mideast conflict, especially where there is a local connection. Rosenthal believes that America’s interests are best served by supporting the democratic state of Israel, the front line in the struggle between Western civilization and radical Islam. The viewpoint is not intended to be liberal or conservative — just pro-Israel.

The author's opinion does not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Jewish Press.

If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

6 Responses to “US Policy on Israel is Stuck in the 1970s”

Comments are closed.

Current Top Story
Jeremy Corbyn re-elected to lead the Labour Party.
Lord Parry Mitchell Resigns ‘As A Jew and Zionist’ from Corbyn-led Labour Party

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/fresno-zionism/us-policy-on-israel-is-stuck-in-the-1970s/2013/02/06/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: