web analytics
January 27, 2015 / 7 Shevat, 5775
 
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post


Lancut

          On my many trips to Poland, I always heard of the amazing synagogue structure in Lancut. In the past, circumstances had not enabled a trip to this town in Southeast Poland, near Rzeszow. But on my latest trip with Rabbi Gluck, Chief Rabbi of Galicia, while going to the graves of tzadikim, I finally got to see for myself one of most complete and highly decorated synagogues remaining in Poland.

 

         The synagogue dates back to 1761 and was funded by the local landowner who built it in order to attract Jews to his town.

 

 



The unimposing front facade of the Lancut Synagogue hides a richly decorated interior.


 

 

        During the Shoah, the local nobleman, Alfred Potocki, saved the synagogue by forcing the Germans to extinguish the fire they had ignited to destroy the building. The only resulting damage was to the women’s section, on the second floor, which was made of wood.

 

 


Detail of the roof of the bimah of the Lancut Synagogue.

 

 

         Today the synagogue stands as a monument to the great Jewish communities of the past. In the entrance hall there is a collection of matzevot, gathered from different places, after having been scattered by the Germans and Communists. Off to one side is the small shul that was supposedly used by Rabbi Jacob Isaac Horowitz, the Chozeh of Lublin and Rabbi Elimelech of Lizhensk (Lejask), both of whom later moved on to the towns, for which they are more famous.

 

 



Partial view of the richly decorated interior of the Lancut Synagogue.


 


 

         The Jews of Lancut were all exiled to Russia or were killed by the Germans. After the war the synagogue was used as a store but turned into a museum in the 1960s.

 

         The Jewish community saw many important rabbis as leaders over the years, including: Moses Zvi Hirsch Meizlish (Meisels, 1758-67); Moses Ben Yitzhak Eisik; Aryeh Leibush (author of Gevurot Aryeh), 1777-1819; and Eliezer Ben Zvi Elimelech Shapira (Lancut’s rabbi, 1816-1865), author of Bnei Yissachar. (Encyclopaedia Judaica entry for Lancut)

 

 


Rabbi Eliezer Ben Zvi Elimelech Shapira  (Lancut’s rabbi, 1816-1865),  author of Bnei Yissachar.

 

 

         Most people who visit Lancut go directly to the synagogue but the Jewish cemetery located on ul. Jageillonska 17. A gate leads up a flight of stairs with two ohalim near the entrance.

 

 


Rabbi Naftali Tzvi Horowitz of Ropshitz (Ropczyce) d. 1827.

 

 

         Whenever I visit a synagogue in Poland, I make sure to daven Shacharis, Minchah, or Maariv there.  Praying in the same shuls where great Jewish leaders from the past did is a most inspiring experience. This was particularly true at the shul in Lancut.

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Lancut”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
U.S. Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, released by Taliban in exchange for 5 Gitmo prisoners
Report: US Sgt Released by Taliban for 5 Gitmo Prisoners to be Charged with Desertion
Latest Sections Stories
Resnick-012315-Artist

Nouril concluded he had no choice: He had to become more observant.

Respler-012315

I find his mother to be a difficult person and my nature is to stay away from people like that.

Here are some recipes to make your Chag La’Illanot a festive one.

Baim-012315

Does standing under the chuppah signal the end of our dream of romance and beautiful sunsets?

We aren’t at a platform; we are underground, just sitting there.

Dr. Lowy believed passionately in higher education for both men and women and would stop at nothing to assist young students in achieving their educational goals.

It’s almost pointless to try to summarize all of the fascinating information that Holzer’s research unearthed.

The special charm of these letters is their immediacy and authenticity of emotion and description.

Why is there such a steep learning curve for teachers? And what can we, as educators and community activists, do better in the educational system and keep first-year teachers in the job?

Teachers, as well as administrators, must be actively involved in the daily prayers that transpire at a school and must set the bar as dugmaot ishiot, role models, on how one must daven.

Often both girls and boys compare their date to their parents.

We love the food, the hotels, and even the wildlife. We love the Israelis.

Few traces remain of the glory days of Jewish life in the kingdoms of Sicily and Naples, but the demise wasn’t due to the eruption of nearby Mount Vesuvius. Rather it was a manmade volcano called the Edict of Expulsion from Spain – and not even an invitation to return in Shevat of 1740 could […]

More Articles from Shmuel Ben Eliezer
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Lauder receiving a special album from Rabbi Maciej Pawlak, director of the Lauder-Morasha school in Warsaw.

In 1989 he hosted a dinner for 157 young Jews with the late Rabbi Chaskel Besser and the Ronald S. Lauder Foundation in Poland was born.

Part of the reconstructed Gwozdziec Synagogue.

The Polin Museum of the History of Polish Jews is designed to tell the whole thousand-year story of the Jews in Poland.

I REMEMBER WHEN I first started working at the Jewish Press 18 years ago, Arnie who was in charge of the newsroom, took me under his wing…

The official beginning of World War II was September 1, 1939. On that day German soldiers invaded Gdansk after bombarding the city with a military warship. As part of the Polish Government’s official series of events marking seven decades since the start of World War II, Poland’s Jewish community and the Jerusalem-based “Shavei Israel” organization held a special ceremony yesterday in the Gdansk synagogue to commemorate the outbreak of the war, which paved the way for the Holocaust.

The official beginning of World War II was September 1, 1939. On that day German soldiers invaded Gdansk after bombarding the city with a military warship. As part of the Polish Government’s official series of events marking seven decades since the start of World War II, Poland’s Jewish community and the Jerusalem-based “Shavei Israel” organization held a special ceremony yesterday in the Gdansk synagogue to commemorate the outbreak of the war, which paved the way for the Holocaust.

September 1, 1939 is the date on which Germany invaded Poland, starting WWII. While it should be said that the start of the war was not the start of the Shoah, which actually began with the rise of Nazism in 1933, it was a major milestone in the annals of the Holocaust. Within the first few days of the war, Germany had conquered and/or bombed much of Poland, including the capital, Warsaw.

September 1, 1939 is the date on which Germany invaded Poland, starting WWII. While it should be said that the start of the war was not the start of the Shoah, which actually began with the rise of Nazism in 1933, it was a major milestone in the annals of the Holocaust. Within the first few days of the war, Germany had conquered and/or bombed much of Poland, including the capital, Warsaw.

In September 1939 the Germans started establishing ghettos in the occupied territory of Poland. Ghettos played an important role in the Jewish extermination policy. They were filled with Polish and Western European Jewish deportees. The ghettos differed in times of existence, size, internal organization, and living conditions. The Germans called them ” death boxes” (Todeskiste). The city of Lodz belonged to the Wartheland District and the Germans changed its name into Litzmannstadt.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/columns/lancut/2007/10/24/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: