web analytics
November 24, 2014 / 2 Kislev, 5775
At a Glance
InDepth
Sponsored Post
IDC Herzliya Campus A Day on Campus

To mark IDC Herzliya’s 20th anniversary, we spent a day following Prof. Uriel Reichman, IDC’s founder and president, and Jonathan Davis, VP for External Relations, around its delightful campus.



Road To Nowhere

We had a sudden glimpse, a small taste, of what it was like for our ancestors in the “old days” in Europe, with the inhabitants of the land actively plotting against us. In the United States we had never seen the hatred and deception exhibited by that smiling anti-Semite.

The societies in which most of us live today would have us believe they are our friends. They have gulled us into thinking they are just like us and we are just like them. And we have fallen in, just the way the Jews in Shushan fell in. Mordechai had warned us against attending the banquet, but we didn’t listen. And just as this brazen young man directed my wife and I down a road to nowhere, so our taivas, our powerful desires, are leading us on a spiritual road to nowhere.

Let us remember what happened in ancient Egypt. As noted above, four-fifths of the Children of Israel died during the Plague of Darkness because they didn’t want to leave Egypt – even though they were being tortured. They didn’t want to follow Moshe Rabbeinu on the road to Har Sinai. Can you imagine? The greatest man in history was waiting to take us to greatness, to freedom, to meet God, and we preferred to remain behind in the country that was breaking us. What was wrong with us?

What was wrong with us? Again, it was the same thing that is wrong with us now.

We slavishly run after a culture whose essence is emptiness, a road to nowhere. “For the gods of the peoples are worthless…but Hashem made heaven and earth” (Pesukai D’Zimra).

Yes, the wine is kosher and the food is kosher, but the desire to mingle with the surrounding culture, the desire to impress them, the worship of their sports heroes, their business heroes, their entertainment heroes, their music, their money, their cars, their homes, their vacations, their values, their technology – all this is treif, treif, treif.

The tragedy of tragedies of Galus is that we have forgotten who we are. We have forgotten that we are unlike other nations. We are the berachah for the entire world but we can only be that berachah when we live as we were meant to live. Our ancient enemy Bilam understood very well who we are when he said, “Hen am levadad yishkon… Behold, it is a nation that will dwell in solitude and not be reckoned among the nations” (Bamidbar 23:9).

Bilam hated us but he saw the unique greatness that is ours and ours alone. Megillas Esther – the quintessential Book of Exile, the book that was written at the precise moment when we were about to be cast among the other nations for so many millennia to come – identifies with precision exactly the weakness that we must at all costs avoid as we struggle to regain our lost heritage and return to our ancient greatness.

At this climactic moment in history, let us not forget that the enmity of the world is buried but not forgotten. Like the smiling Russian, the nations are waiting for their opportunity. The prophets, thousands of years ago, told us what would befall us at the end of days:

[An] entire army, horses and riders, all of them clothed in splendor, a vast assembly with buckler and shield, all of them wielding swords…many people will be with [Gog]…. In the end of years [they] will come to a land…gathered from many nations, upon the mountains of Israel that had lain desolate continuously, [to people] who had been brought out from the nations, all of them dwelling in security. You will attack, like a storm you will come; you will be like a cloud covering the earth, you and all your cohorts and the many nations with you…. Thus said the Lord…on that day…I will punish [Gog]…I will be exalted and I will be sanctified… [Yechezkel 38]

May Hashem bless us with understanding and courage to “distinguish between Israel and the nations.” May we soon penetrate the dark cloud covering the summit of Har Sinai. By cleaving to our Father in Heaven we will see the clouds suddenly disperse and, like the Jews in Shushan haBira, we too will have “light and gladness and joy and honor.”

About the Author: Roy Neuberger's latest book, “2020 Vision” (Feldheim) is available in English, Hebrew, Spanish, French, Russian, and Georgian. An e-edition is available at www.feldheim.com. Roy is also the author of "From Central Park to Sinai: How I Found My Jewish Soul” (available in English, Hebrew and Russian, and Georgian) and “Worldstorm.” Roy and Leah Neuberger speak publicly on topics related to his books and articles. He can be contacted at roy@tosinai.com or through his websites www.tosinai.com and www.2020visionthebook.com.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

2 Responses to “Road To Nowhere”

  1. Anonymous says:

    Wow! At first I wondered if Mr Neuberger had written a Charedesque article. But upon further reflection I realized that this very message is what Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveichik, would teach.
    The Rav wrote in his book, Five Addresses, on page 31 “There is secular culture, great and powerful technology creating wonders and changing the foundations of our life..This secular culture entails destructive elements, many negative and perverse aspects; it may be a blessing and a curse simultaneously, and thus AS LONG AS ONE CAN LIVE WITHOUT IT SO MUCH THE BETTER FOR THE SPIRIT.
    We owe it to ourselves to remember what is our true goal in this evermore materialistic world really is.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Wow! At first I wondered if Mr Neuberger had written a Charedesque article. But upon further reflection I realized that this very message is what Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveichik, would teach.
    The Rav wrote in his book, Five Addresses, on page 31 “There is secular culture, great and powerful technology creating wonders and changing the foundations of our life..This secular culture entails destructive elements, many negative and perverse aspects; it may be a blessing and a curse simultaneously, and thus AS LONG AS ONE CAN LIVE WITHOUT IT SO MUCH THE BETTER FOR THE SPIRIT.
    We owe it to ourselves to remember what is our true goal in this evermore materialistic world really is.

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Talks, talks and talks a between p5+1 and Iran.
Kerry Ready for another ‘Framework’ to Let Iran Off the Hook
Latest Indepth Stories
David Ben-Gurion publicly pronounces the Declaration of the State of Israel, May 14 1948, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Arab opposition to a Jewish State of any size was made known by word and deed in the form of terror

beta-israel2

Operation Moses: First time in history that non-blacks came to Africa to free blacks from oppression

Jo-map

As Arabs murder and maim Jews, Jordan’s leaders bark the blood libel of “Israeli aggression.”

bulb

Perhaps attacking a terrorist’s legacy broadly and publicly would dissuade others from terrorism?

R’ Aryeh yelled “Run, I’ll fight!” Using a chair against terrorists to buy time so others could flee

Riot started when Muslim students wore the Pal. kaffiyeh and Druze students demanded them removed

The “Media” didn’t want us to know what a kind, giving, loving young woman Dalia was.

A “Palestine” could become another Lebanon, with many different factions battling for control.

Maimonides himself walked and prayed in the permissible areas when he visited Eretz Yisrael in 1165

Having a strong community presence at the polls shows our elected officials we care about the issues

Israel’s Temple Mount policy prefers to blames the Jews-not the attackers-for the crisis.

When Islam conquered the Holy Land, it made its capital in Ramle of all places, not in Jerusalem.

I joined the large crowd but this time it was more personal; my cousin Aryeh was one of the victims.

Terrorists aren’t driven by social, economic, or other grievances, rather by a fanatical worldview.

The phrase that the “Arabs are resorting to violence” is disgraceful and blames the victim.

Tuesday, Yom Shlishi, a doubly good day in the Torah, Esav’s hands tried to silence Yaakov’s voice.

More Articles from Roy S. Neuberger

In the recent Gaza war and its aftermath, we saw a totally illogical reaction from the world.

Our rabbis told us it’s going to be very difficult before Mashiach comes. Should we fool ourselves?

The unwarranted hatred among us that caused the destruction of the Second Temple clearly still plagues us.

At the end of the harvest, winter begins. The earth becomes cold and hard, nights are long, and the sun seems far away in the southern sky. The sap ceases to flow in the trees. But in this season of temporary “death” Hashem sends down harbingers of coming life in the form of tal u’matar livrachah – dew and rain for a blessing – upon the earth.

“Logically” speaking, after the millennia of hatred and destruction directed against us, there should not be one Jew in the world today who still keeps the Torah.

They were lining up for gas masks in Israel.

Apparently, at the very time of year we are supposed to be full of simcha, Hashem wants us to be aware of the possibility of danger. Indeed, during the Yom Tov of Sukkos, we read cataclysmic haftaras dealing with the ultimate war, the Milchemes Gog Umagog. Where does that war take place? In the Holy Land, of course, where the eyes of the world are always focused.

At the mikveh they were discussing Egypt.

So many things seem to be unraveling. It’s not just Egypt but the entire Middle East. No, it’s not just the Middle East; it’s the entire world.

What is the relationship between Pesach and Shavuos?
Rabbi Naftali Jaeger, rosh yeshiva of Sh’or Yoshuv, relates in the name of the Ishbitzer Rebbe a striking metaphor:

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/front-page/road-to-nowhere/2013/02/20/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: