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December 18, 2014 / 26 Kislev, 5775
 
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Visiting Residents: the Daily Plea of Elul

Student blowing a shofar

Young students blow a shofar in the classroom of a Talmud Torah.
Photo Credit: Nati Shohat/Flash90

We know, only too well, that being excited about a routine is almost impossible. And yet we also know that without the enthusiasm, it will be very difficult to maintain it, let alone pass it on to the next generation.

As the year is coming to an end, with endless days filled with doing the very same commandments, we besiege G-d on each remaining day, asking for one vital ingredient for the one yet to come: May we never get used to our routine.

May we be permanent residents, feeling like visitors.

About the Author: Rabbi Yehoshua Grunstein is Director of training and placement at The Straus-Amiel Institute at Ohr Torah Stone.


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As the year is coming to an end, with endless days filled with doing the very same commandments, we besiege G-d on each remaining day, asking for one vital ingredient for the one yet to come: May we never get used to our routine.

I’d like to submit that anything Frequent in our life tends be Forgotten! Something we see every day does not rank high on our list of concerns, and therefore, we just naturally forget about it.

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