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August 28, 2016 / 24 Av, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Itamar’

Terrorists Attempt Attack on Court During Sentencing of Fogels’ Murderer

Tuesday, January 17th, 2012

A major terror attack at the Salem Military Court was prevented by IDF soldiers, just as the court was set to sentence the convicted murderer of almost all the members of a Jewish family from Samaria.

Amjad Awad, who entered the Salem Military Court with a smile on his face Monday, said he did not regret stabbing to death both parents and 3 of the 5 children of the Fogel family in their home in Itamar in March 2010.

Before the court handed down the sentence – five life sentences – two terrorists approached a checkpoint of the court carrying bags containing 11 pipe bombs, a gun, and ammunition.  The two 20 year-olds were stopped by Border and Military Police, searched, and discovered to be on their way to attack the court.

Awad was convicted of all charges against him: five counts of murder, two counts of weapons trafficking, and conspiracy to commit murder.

Awad’s cousin and partner, Hakim, was sentenced in September to five life terms for the murders of parents Udi, 36 and Ruth,35, and their children Yoav, 11, Elad, 4, and Hadas, four months.  Three of the Fogel children – eldest daughter Tamar, and boys Roi and Yishai – were not involved in the attack.  They are being raised by their grandparents.

Just eight days prior, Border Police caught 4 terrorists carrying 12 explosives, a gun, ammunition, and a commando knife.

Malkah Fleisher

Terrorist Who Murdered Five Members of Fogel Family Gets Five Life Sentences

Monday, January 16th, 2012

Amjad Awad, one of the two individuals convicted in the Fogel family massacre in Itamar, was sentenced to five consecutive life terms and an additional seven years in prison.

The Samaria Military Court on Monday sentenced Awad, after convicting him and his cousin last November in the shocking murders of Udi and Ruth Fogel and three of their children: Yoav, 11, Elad, 4 and four-month-old Hadas.

“I don’t regret what I did, and would do it again,” Amjad Awad said in May. “I’m proud of what I did and I’ll accept any punishment I get, even death, because I did it all for Palestine,”

Awad entered the courtroom smiling, and remained silent throughout the course of the hearing.

 

 

Jewish Press Staff

Murdered Family Honored By Holocaust Torah

Thursday, November 17th, 2011

In an effort to honor the memory of a Jewish Israeli family which experienced its own personal Holocaust, an American donor has dedicated a Torah scroll rescued from the flames of the Shoah to help build their community.

Ehud (36), Ruth (35), Yoav (11), Elad (4), and Hadas (3 months) Fogel were knifed to death in their home in the Samaria community of Itamar on March 11 by a pair of Arabs from neighboring Awarta.  Three Fogel children – Tamar, Roi, and Yishai – were not physically harmed and have been taken in by their grandparents.

An international outcry was raised following the massacre, with foreign governments condemning the killings and Jewish communities holding memorial services.  In New York, a man by the name of Jack Ross prepared a gift for the community of Itamar, to strengthen the grieving town.

Ross, who was in possession of a Torah scroll which had been rescued from Poland during the Holocaust, made contact with Itamar with the help of Americans for a Safe Israel (AFSI), and offered to donate the scroll to the community.

He then had the scroll repaired and restored by a scribe.  Next, he joined a group from AFSI to go to Itamar and help finish building a synagogue and new ark for the residents, a project sponsored by the Israel Independence Fund.  On Tuesday, he and the inhabitants of Itamar took part in a ceremony to write the last letters in the scroll, and to escort it to its new home in the new ark of the new synagogue.

At the ceremony, Samaria Regional Council Liaison David Ha’ivri and Itamar Mayor Moshe Goldsmith presented Ross and AFSI president Helen Freedman with certificates of appreciation.

Samaria Regional Council Director Gershon Mesika told attendees that just as the Torah is the heart of the Jewish people, Itamar is the heart of Israel on the map.  He thanked Ross and the directors of AFSI and the Israel Independence Fund for their friendship and ongoing support.

Malkah Fleisher

‘Winds Of Change’ Should Not Include A Palestinian State

Wednesday, April 13th, 2011

“With the winds of change blowing through the Arab world, it’s more urgent than ever that we try to seize the opportunity to create a peaceful solution between the Palestinians and the Israelis,” President Obama saidlast week after meeting with Israeli president Shimon Peres.

Peres’s visit was widely regarded as a groundbreaker for a visit in May by Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Netanyahu is expected to come under a mounting tide of pressure on the Palestinian-state issue, culminating in a Palestinian attempt to secure UN recognition of a Palestinian state in September.

Meanwhile a poll by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem has found that one-third of Palestinians approved the attack in the Israeli West Bank community of Itamar in March. In that attack, five members of the Fogel family – the parents as well as their 11-year-old son, 4-year-old son, and 3-month-old daughter – were stabbed to death in their home.

Four decades ago America was shocked by the Manson murders – intruders shot and stabbed to death four adults and a teenage boy at the house of actress Sharon Tate in Los Angeles (Tate, one of the stabbing victims, was eight months pregnant). One can imagine the horror Americans would have felt toward any society one-third of whose members approved the Manson murders. On the scale of horror, the Itamar massacre, given the ages of three of the victims, was even worse.

Two other points should be made.

One is that the Itamar perpetrators have not yet been caught – in contrast to other Palestinian terror attacks where Israeli security forces usually quickly nabbed the culprits. The delay this time is attributed to Israel having withdrawn its forces from much of the West Bank, to be replaced by U.S.-trained Palestinian forces.

The second point is that while the ages of the young Itamar victims may indeed have been “too much” for many Palestinians, that wasn’t the case with the 2008 massacre by gunfire of seven teenage boys and a young man in Jerusalem’s Mercaz HaRav Yeshiva. That attack won the approval of 84 percent of Palestinians.

The murderous hatred of many of the Palestinians who are supposed to be awarded a state abutting Israel can be added to the many other arguments against such a state, at least at this time, that make no impression on the devout. Or as Netanyahu himself said recently – not about a Palestinian state per se, but about the supposed centrality of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict to the region and the world – “There is no evidence that these true believers will not ignore.”

Take, for instance, the statement by Obama, who certainly must be counted among those believers, mentioned above. Rationally speaking, the “winds of change blowing through the Arab world” should not make “more urgent than ever” the creation of a Palestinian state, but induce more wariness than ever.

Those winds have already blown away the Mubarak government in Egypt, which upheld a formal albeit icy-cold peace with Israel for three decades, and is likely to be replaced by a far more hostile, quite possibly belligerent, regime.

Then there’s Jordan, also formally at peace with Israel since 1994, now subject as well to instability and seething with Islamist and Palestinian hatred of Israel. As for Syria, while the Alawite regime of the Assads is already one of the most hostile toward Israel, it’s also a regime that has, out of pragmatism, maintained a peaceful border since 1973; its weakening, and the rise of Sunni Islamists in its stead, could well put an end to that pragmatism.

Rationally, then, the overall instability of the Middle East, where regimes can disappear overnight, is not an argument for creating yet another Middle Eastern state squeezed up against your borders; it’s an argument against it.

To this must be added the results of Israel’s previous territorial withdrawals over the past decade – from Lebanon, leading to Hizbullah’s takeover of the south and eventually the whole country, now teeming with military facilities directed at Israel; and from Gaza, leading to the empowerment of Hamas and an ongoing nightmare of rocket fire and warfare.

Put popular Palestinian hatred in the mix, and the idea of the Palestinian state as an urgent policy goal emerges as not just irrational but crazy. It’s been suggested that Netanyahu, instead of trying to parry the pressures with deft diplomatic games, should start boldly enunciating the truth. It makes a lot of sense.

P. David Hornik

The Beginning Of The Left’s End

Wednesday, March 30th, 2011

I was filled with an uncomfortable feeling in the face of the Itamar massacre. Everyone is in shock. I feel horrible pain. But I am not shocked.


Shock is the result of surprise – and I am not surprised by what happened. I honestly don’t understand why others are surprised. We didn’t read what they did to the bodies of the 35 Gush Etzion martyrs? We didn’t live through years of suicide bombings? Just recently, Israel released the terrorist Samir Kuntar, who smashed the skull of four-year-old Einat Haran on the Nahariya beach years ago. What is the difference between this murderer and the murderer of Hadas Fogel? What has changed? This is how many Arabs act. There is nothing to be surprised about.


The shock most severely affected those people who, with all their might, insisted on deceiving themselves. They convinced themselves that we are in a peace process, that all the Arabs want are political rights, sovereignty, self-definition and the like. They wanted so badly to be normal. On the way, they fashioned an enemy for themselves who demanded what they wanted him to demand. Now they are shocked. For a moment they had to face the truth: This enemy is not normal, and his goal is not what their Western minds are trying to force into reality. Logical goals like self-definition and other palatable concepts are not part of the true picture.


The slaughter of a sleeping baby is unacceptable as a tool in the struggle for any type of liberation. It comes from a dark place, from a place that simply wants to destroy you. It is behavior with which we are quite familiar – behavior that says to the shocked Israeli, “What are you talking about? I do not want you out of Shechem and Ramallah. I have them, anyway. All the money that you invest there will not make me like you. I simply want you out of this world. Go back to the Ukrainians, the Polish, the Austrians and the Germans. Let them take care of you. I did not slaughter the baby because she is an occupier on my sovereign soil. I slaughtered her because she is a Jew.”


The source of the shock is the understanding that there is nobody with whom to make peace – because they do not want to. The Arabs simply cannot stand the fact that we live anywhere in the world – certainly that we live in the Land of Israel.


In the past, the leftist elite managed to deal with the shock engendered by terror attacks. Their quintessentially demagogic and confusing slogan, “We will not let the enemies of peace achieve their goal” (and so we will continue with the retreats euphemistically known as the peace process) worked quite well with the public. But now it seems that something is starting to change. The massacre in Itamar shocked Israeli society more than similar attacks in the past because it no longer has anywhere to hide from the conclusions. The Oslo spin no longer works.


The Itamar massacre was perpetrated on the backdrop of the collapse of the regimes in Arab lands. Hosni Mubarak’s ouster revealed the fragility of our peace agreement with Egypt. It brought to the surface the fact that the dictators sold us the illusion of peace in the lowest dosage possible to keep us ignoring how their countrymen really felt about Israel. That is what made the Itamar massacre so shocking, brought all of our top statesmen to the funeral, and created the new perspective in the reporting of the tragedy and the live coverage on Army Radio.


“And so, since yesterday, I sit here in the corner, frustrated and frightened, internalizing that it is possible that in the end we will not have the peace that we dreamed of,” wrote Guy Maroz in Maariv after the massacre.


He even gives a tongue in cheek clue as to the only hope that he can think of: “Since yesterday, I want to hide under the wide Messianic dress of [settler leader Daniella Weiss].”


We are at the threshold of a new reality. On one hand, we are still firmly meshed onto the Western, Oslo playing field. We do not attack, but only retaliate. We are completely subordinate to the Western values that always force us to try to prove that we are the most miserable victims on the block. We are still very far from the ability to substantially change direction. On the other hand, though, the entire playing field is crumbling away.


We do not expect to win a political victory that will allow us to change the rules of the game in Israel. On the contrary, the game itself is about to change. The only relevant players in the new game will be those of us who have toiled throughout the years for a genuinely Jewish state.

Moshe Feiglin

Itamar: A Painful And Powerful Wake-Up Call

Wednesday, March 16th, 2011

Early this past Shabbat morning we heard from military sources that a family had been brutally slaughtered in Itamar, a settlement near Shechem. Since my niece lives there with six children, we were extremely worried even though we realized there were many families that fit the description.

It was a Shabbat filled with anxiety as people quietly asked each other about the victims and whether there were any more details. At the end of Shabbat we learned it wasn’t our niece and felt a surge of relief – but we were immediately overcome with deep pain on hearing the sickening details of how a Jewish family was gruesomely butchered in their sleep.

This was Shabbat Parshat Vayikra – the section of the Torah dealing with sacrifices which opens with the words “adam ki yakriv mikem korban“- “if a man brings a sacrifice of himself.” The message here is that if necessary, Am Yisrael is willing to sacrifice its own life for its ideals. On this Shabbat, the Fogel family – parents Udi and Ruth and three of their six children, 11-year-old Yoav, 4-year-old Elad, and newborn Hadas – became the most recent sacrifices.

This was not the first family to be slaughtered. We remember the horrifying murders of the Shabo, Dickstein, Gavish, Aymos, Unger and countless other families destroyed by Arab terror. In case we had forgotten, this Shabbat offered a brutal reminder of the nature of our enemies. They have no problem slitting the throat of an infant or thrusting a knife into the heart of a toddler. They are not fit to be called human, certainly not fit to live in Eretz Yisrael and obviously not fit to be peace partners.

This cruel event finally awakened the Israeli government into realizing that indoctrination against Jews in the Palestinian schools, streets and mosques has received the blessing of Mahmoud Abbas, who splendidly fills Yasir Arafat’s shoes as a depraved leader. Under Abbas, terrorists have been elevated to role models with streets and squares in Palestinian villages named after them.

Prime Minister Netanyahu went so far as to say he could not take seriously Abbas’s initial vague and ambiguous condemnation of the senseless slaughter. He said it was not enough to mumble an apology; Abbas must take immediate steps to stop the murder of innocent citizens.

I only hope this barbaric act of terror serves as a wake-up call to our leaders. They must recognize that our conflict is not merely territorial; we are fighting for our very lives and national existence in our homeland.

Our leaders must understand their basic responsibility is to secure Jewish lives by destroying the hotbeds of terror and developing Jewish communities in Judea and Samaria. Our leaders must end the embarrassing displays of national weakness inherent in destroying Israeli outposts, announcing a readiness to engage in painful compromises like awarding military and administrative powers to the Palestinian Authority, and begging Abbas to negotiate with promises of maintaining the building freeze in Jerusalem, Judea and Samaria.

The Fogel family’s grief has become the nation’s grief. We are reminded of Queen Esther’s appeal as she feared for her people: “Go and gather all the Jews.” Relief and support would come only if the Jews acted as a community. The unity of the Jewish people was expressed this past weekend, not only by the tens of thousands who participated in the funeral but by live broadcast of the funeral and eulogies on all national television and radio channels.

As at the funerals of slain Golani officer Eliraz Peretz and the eight murdered Mercaz HaRav students, Israelis had the elevating experience of hearing from the parents and siblings of the victims. Their painful yet confident words of faith and determination served to strengthen our devotion to the development of Jewish life and ideals in all of Eretz Yisrael and especially in Judea and Samaria.

The moving words revealed again the intrinsic essence of the Jewish soul and the divine inspiration that is the dynamic spirit embodied in this generation of bold pioneers, educators and defenders of the Jewish people in Eretz Yisrael. They called on the Israeli government to continue unlimited building in the Jewish communities of Judea and Samaria. Only this expression of strength will deter terrorists from daring to strike again. Only multitudes of Jews in villages, towns and cities – men and women of faith, determined and ready to sacrifice – will insure the continuation of the Zionist process.

Rabbi Eliezer Waldman

The Best Revenge Is To Build

Wednesday, March 16th, 2011

Even for a region accustomed to brutality, last week’s Sabbath massacre in Itamar stands out for its sheer savagery and barbarism.
 
Just hours after their home had been filled with song and sanctity in honor of the weekly day of rest, the Fogel family was decimated by at least one Palestinian terrorist in an attack so horrific that it defies comprehension.
 
With methodical cruelty, the perpetrator went from room to room, slashing and stabbing the parents and three of their children.
 
As a result, Ruth and Udi Fogel, along with their sons Yoav, 11, and Elad, 4, and their 3-month old daughter Hadas, were murdered, leaving behind three young orphans under the age of 12.
 
The carnage came as a painful reminder of the depravity of Israel’s enemies, who do not hesitate to raise a knife against a Jewish toddler sleeping peacefully alongside her father in bed.
 
Photos of the Fogel children lying in pools of blood with stab wounds on their innocent young bodies were circulated over the Internet and around the world, in an attempt to underline the threat posed to civilization by Palestinian terror.
 
But as shocking as the images are, they are unlikely to make more than a dent in international public opinion.
 
After all, since the signing of the 1993 Oslo accords, the Jewish state has been the target of an unprecedented wave of terror, as Palestinians have employed everything from suicide bombings to rocket attacks on towns and cities.
 
And despite this, much of the international community still blames Israel for the lack of progress toward peace while all but overlooking the butchery committed against it.
 
The attack in Itamar was the work of pure evil, and Israel should hunt down those responsible for it with unrelenting determination. No effort should be spared to punish or capture the terrorists who carried out this brutal assault.
 
            In the aftermath of the incident, the government rightly pointed the finger at the Palestinian Authority’s ongoing incitement to violence, highlighting the glorification of terror that appears in the official Palestinian press.
 
Indeed, shortly after the attack, Palestinian Chairman Mahmoud Abbas met with a group of Palestinian youths participating in a song competition lionizing suicide bombers.
 
And this past Sunday, as the Fogel family was laid to rest in Jerusalem, the Fatah youth movement organized a public ceremony in Al-Bireh, near Ramallah, to name a square after terrorist Dalal Mughrabi.
 
Mughrabi was one of the thugs who took part in the 1978 Coastal Road Massacre that killed 38 Israelis, including 13 children.
 
There is no doubt that the years of indoctrination of hatred and animosity toward Israel in Palestinian schoolbooks, radio shows, television programs and newspaper articles all contributed to the warped morality that produced the killers of the Fogel family.
 
And the cult of death is alive and well in places such as Gaza, where Palestinians literally cheered the news of the attack and even handed out sweets on the streets of Rafah.
 
A society that countenances such behavior is clearly one that has foregone even the most rudimentary elements of decency and ethics.
 

Hence, to expect Israel to make concessions to its leadership is both irresponsible and reckless.

Needless to say, the international community also bears part of the blame, if only because of its continuing campaign of delegitimization against the Jewish communities of Judea and Samaria.
 
By labeling the Jewish population of the territories “illegal” and “illegitimate”, they have played into the hands of the terrorists, essentially painting a target on the backs of every Jew living there.
 
If Jewish families in Itamar or Hebron are repeatedly deemed to be “obstacles to peace” and “occupiers,” then is it any surprise that there will be those who attack them?
 
In responding to the massacre, Prime Minister Netanyahu wisely chose to underline Israel’s resolve by approving the construction of several hundred new housing units in Judea and Samaria.
 
It was an important first step toward strengthening the Jewish presence in these areas, even if it fell far short of what can and should be done. Most of the homes approved for construction are in communities such as Ariel and Gush Etzion, which everyone agrees Israel would hold onto as part of any final settlement.
 
A stronger message could have – and should have – been sent to our foes by authorizing the establishment of new settlements as well as expanding Itamar itself.
 
It needs to be made clear to the Palestinians that their attempts to eradicate communities such as Itamar will only result in their further expansion.
 
Or to put it even more bluntly: The best revenge is to build.
 
Where the Palestinians seek to extinguish Jewish life, let’s fortify and expand it.  Where they seek to snuff us out, let’s make it abundantly clear that come hell or high water, we are not going anywhere.
 

            The Jewish people have returned to the Land of Israel, and whether the world likes it or not, we are here to stay.

 

 

Michael Freund is chairman of Shavei Israel (www.shavei.org), a Jerusalem-based organization that reaches out and assists “lost Jews” seeking to return to the Jewish people. His Jewish Press-exclusive column appears the third week of each month.

Jason Maoz

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/columns/the-best-revenge-is-to-build/2011/03/16/

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