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November 24, 2014 / 2 Kislev, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘restaurant’

Husband Spending Too Much Time With Business Partner Of The Opposite Sex

Wednesday, December 15th, 2010

Question: I trust my husband implicitly. He has never given me reason to suspect him of wrongdoing. So, why am I writing? Three years ago he began a new job. He works very closely with a frum woman. They make a very good team – she is the salesperson and crucial to the business. A few months ago they started to train together to run in a half marathon for tzedakah. Then I found out that she and her husband had separated. I did not hear this from my husband – it was a friend who told me. When I asked my husband why he didn’t tell me, he said that she asked him not to tell anyone and he respected her privacy. Then I found out that they skipped a workout because of the rain and instead had lunch together. This I heard from a friend who saw them together. Please understand I don’t want to think he’s doing anything wrong. Surely he wouldn’t be in a restaurant for all to see if he was up to no good. He says I’m being overly sensitive. Is he right?

Answer: Let me begin by saying – stop trusting your husband implicitly. You said he’s never given you reason to suspect him of wrongdoing. Guess what? Now he has. I’m not a fan of any married person spending loads of time with a member of the opposite sex – alone – especially for extracurricular activities. Training for a half marathon means they have practice runs for at least an hour to start and eventually it will work itself up to two hours or more. As they jog they chat, laugh, discuss business; all the things you’d like to do with your husband but probably don’t have the time to. One of the reasons you don’t have that time is because he’s with her. It’s one thing to have a business relationship, and even that should be scrutinized, but this is a further step – and it’s dangerous. The number one place men meet the women they cheat with is at work, the number two place is while engaging in a hobby. Your situation rings both bells. Trust your intuition. If you are getting a sick feeling in the pit of your stomach over this, that tells you better than any list I could give you that something is up.

What may be confusing you is that you don’t want to believe your husband is physically cheating on you. But this doesn’t mean you should be ignoring his behavior. Unlike what many think, research has proven that the vast majority of men who cheat had an emotional relationship with the woman well before it became physical. Perhaps your husband is out in public with this woman because he hasn’t gone so far as to physically cheat, so he’s not hiding the relationship. However, this doesn’t mean he is not doing anything inappropriate. Spending hours of leisure time alone with her and having this emotional relationship is inappropriate. It is also likely to develop into an emotional bond that will threaten your marriage, regardless of whether he ever turns it into a physical affair. You have every right to be concerned.

Have a serious talk with him and explain that you want to feel closer to him. Let him know that you value your marriage and don’t want to take what seems to be the easy route of not confronting the situation. Tell him your frustration; don’t make it about this other woman as much as it being about the two of you. Both of you deserve to have more time together and should be working on how to make it happen. Maybe the two of you need a new hobby or exercise routine. Be willing to listen to what he’d like to do for fun and share your own ideas as well. You want to stop him from relating to this other woman, but you need to give him an outlet for this emotional energy. I’m not suggesting he’s missing something and you’re at fault. I’m suggesting that he’s acting inappropriately, but this emotional energy needs to find a home and it better be your home. You want to get your marriage back on track to where he’s getting this emotional bond and then some, with you.

Kulinary Adventures Holds Second Tour

Thursday, November 4th, 2010

    Gourmet mouth-watering food, top notch cooking classes, a wine and cheese tasting, and exclusive tours of a kosher chocolate factory and Manhattan’s premier farmers’ market were on the menu and, in its first tour, Kulinary Adventures served up these and more.

 

    The kosher culinary tour company, launched earlier this year, conducted its inaugural tour on June 6 and 7. Participants hailed from as far away as Brazil, California, and Virginia, with New Yorkers and New Jerseyans also turning out for what was billed as a “one-of-a-kind” kosher foodie adventure.

 


Ahi tuna tartare in wonton cups, arranged on a

bed of sesame seeds with scallion flowers

 

 

    Featured chefs included Chef Shaya Klechevsky, chef instructor and owner of At Your Palate, the kosher gourmet catering company; Chef John Scoff, executive chef instructor from Home Cooking New York; and food stylist and Chef Lauren Braun Costello, the author of Notes on Cooking: A Short Guide to an Essential Craft.

 

    Among the featured recipes of Klechevsky’s class on French country cooking were crepes suzette and savory crepe recipes, as well as a watercress salad with goat cheese and lemon thyme vinaigrette.

 

    Scoff led the Kulinary Adventurers on a private tour of Manhattan’s Union Square greenmarket, and followed that up with a cooking class using fresh seasonal ingredients found at the market. The participants partook in fresh-from-the market roasted potatoes and fennel, sugar snap peas amandine, pan roasted chicken with sherry-thyme sauce and a fresh strawberry and rhubarb crumble.

 


Aron Ritter, president of the Kosher Wine Society,

leading a wine and cheese tasting

 

 

    Braun Costello’s food styling class included demonstrations on how to use ring molds, squeeze bottles, and a mandoline to turn ordinary plated food into a decorative culinary presentation.

 

    Participants also enjoyed a chef’s tasting lunch at Basil, a dairy restaurant located in Brooklyn, which was recently lauded in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times, among other publications.

 

    Although this was an inaugural tour, participants we spoke to raved about the balance of activities that the tour provided, which ranged from active cooking classes and tours to the more leisurely wine and cheese tasting and spa experience.

 

 


Chef Shaya Klechevsky demonstrates

French country cooking techniques

 

 

    One participant, Abby Robyn, joined the tour while on a visit from Los Angeles, CA. When asked about her experience, she replied, “What a wonderful culinary adventure! Excellent chefs with recipes for new dishes that I actually will make. And besides the great activities, such warm and interesting people in the group. I can’t recommend Kulinary Adventures highly enough.”

 

    Another participant, Miriam Rosenblum of East Brunswick, NJ, decided to come on Kulinary Adventures because of her love of good food and great cooking. She lauded Scoff, in particular, for his “extreme organized (style) and confidence, and the loads of useful tips and tidbits” he gave.

 

    Pearl Mann, of Woodmere, NY thought that “all of the presenters were excellent, knowledgeable, and personable” and added that she is now inspired to do more in the kitchen.

 

 

 

Kulinary Adventures participants at

Tumbador, the artisan chocolate factory

 

 

    Kulinary Adventures is planning a second tour, to take place on December 19 and 20. The upcoming tour’s cooking classes will focus on Italian and Levant (Sephardic) cuisines, respectively. In addition, a historical eating and walking tour of NYC’s Lower East Side will feature tastings and food history at local area establishments. There will also be a cookie decorating class, using the latest techniques in fondant and royal icing, as well as a wine and cheese tasting and several restaurant visits.

 

    Anyone interested in registering for the next tour should visit kulinaryadventures.com or call 646- 823-7529.

 

    All food served at Kulinary Adventures is supervised by Orthodox supervision agencies.

Kulinary Adventures Holds Second Tour

Thursday, November 4th, 2010

    Gourmet mouth-watering food, top notch cooking classes, a wine and cheese tasting, and exclusive tours of a kosher chocolate factory and Manhattan’s premier farmers’ market were on the menu and, in its first tour, Kulinary Adventures served up these and more.

 

    The kosher culinary tour company, launched earlier this year, conducted its inaugural tour on June 6 and 7. Participants hailed from as far away as Brazil, California, and Virginia, with New Yorkers and New Jerseyans also turning out for what was billed as a “one-of-a-kind” kosher foodie adventure.

 

Ahi tuna tartare in wonton cups, arranged on a

bed of sesame seeds with scallion flowers

 

 

    Featured chefs included Chef Shaya Klechevsky, chef instructor and owner of At Your Palate, the kosher gourmet catering company; Chef John Scoff, executive chef instructor from Home Cooking New York; and food stylist and Chef Lauren Braun Costello, the author of Notes on Cooking: A Short Guide to an Essential Craft.

 

    Among the featured recipes of Klechevsky’s class on French country cooking were crepes suzette and savory crepe recipes, as well as a watercress salad with goat cheese and lemon thyme vinaigrette.

 

    Scoff led the Kulinary Adventurers on a private tour of Manhattan’s Union Square greenmarket, and followed that up with a cooking class using fresh seasonal ingredients found at the market. The participants partook in fresh-from-the market roasted potatoes and fennel, sugar snap peas amandine, pan roasted chicken with sherry-thyme sauce and a fresh strawberry and rhubarb crumble.

 

Aron Ritter, president of the Kosher Wine Society,

leading a wine and cheese tasting

 

 

    Braun Costello’s food styling class included demonstrations on how to use ring molds, squeeze bottles, and a mandoline to turn ordinary plated food into a decorative culinary presentation.

 

    Participants also enjoyed a chef’s tasting lunch at Basil, a dairy restaurant located in Brooklyn, which was recently lauded in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times, among other publications.

 

    Although this was an inaugural tour, participants we spoke to raved about the balance of activities that the tour provided, which ranged from active cooking classes and tours to the more leisurely wine and cheese tasting and spa experience.

 

 

Chef Shaya Klechevsky demonstrates

French country cooking techniques

 

 

    One participant, Abby Robyn, joined the tour while on a visit from Los Angeles, CA. When asked about her experience, she replied, “What a wonderful culinary adventure! Excellent chefs with recipes for new dishes that I actually will make. And besides the great activities, such warm and interesting people in the group. I can’t recommend Kulinary Adventures highly enough.”

 

    Another participant, Miriam Rosenblum of East Brunswick, NJ, decided to come on Kulinary Adventures because of her love of good food and great cooking. She lauded Scoff, in particular, for his “extreme organized (style) and confidence, and the loads of useful tips and tidbits” he gave.

 

    Pearl Mann, of Woodmere, NY thought that “all of the presenters were excellent, knowledgeable, and personable” and added that she is now inspired to do more in the kitchen.

 

 

 

Kulinary Adventures participants at

Tumbador, the artisan chocolate factory

 

 

    Kulinary Adventures is planning a second tour, to take place on December 19 and 20. The upcoming tour’s cooking classes will focus on Italian and Levant (Sephardic) cuisines, respectively. In addition, a historical eating and walking tour of NYC’s Lower East Side will feature tastings and food history at local area establishments. There will also be a cookie decorating class, using the latest techniques in fondant and royal icing, as well as a wine and cheese tasting and several restaurant visits.

 

    Anyone interested in registering for the next tour should visit kulinaryadventures.com or call 646- 823-7529.

 

    All food served at Kulinary Adventures is supervised by Orthodox supervision agencies.

Going Uptown

Thursday, April 8th, 2010

I was walking down Coney Island Ave. when I saw an old acquaintance eating in a non-kosher restaurant. I wanted to approach him and ask him if he would be interested in putting on tefillin. But I felt hesitant, and wrestled internally to overcome my embarrassment. Finally I gathered enough confidence to enter the restaurant and approach my friend. Greeting him warmly, I gently asked if he would like to put on tefillin. He politely refused and, after a brief conversation, I was on my way.

A few minutes later, I received a phone call from someone asking for help with a computer problem. I intuitively felt that this phone call was somehow connected to what had just transpired. In truth I was not interested in taking this job, for the customer lived in uptown Manhattan, very far from Brooklyn. Yet I knew that this was from Hashem, and was directly connected to the incident in the restaurant.

I reluctantly agreed to travel uptown to fix this person’s computer, and spent the entire trip upset about the inconvenience. When I arrived, I noticed many mezuzahs on the doors in the apartment building, and when I arrived at my client’s door, I saw that he too had a mezuzah. It turned out that this individual was an Israeli.

After fixing his computer problem quickly and effortlessly, we chatted. I asked him if he would like to put on tefillin, and he unhesitatingly agreed.

I thought of the two incidents – so close to one another.

I felt like I had just lived through a living lesson. It is a merit to be given the opportunity to do a mitzvah. Sometimes, one has to make efforts to merit completing a holy task. So if you are encountering barriers to completing a mitzvah, don’t give up.

On the contrary, the difficulty should be an inspiration to make greater efforts. And those greater efforts will yield bountiful fruit.

A Jewish Call For Employee Rights

Thursday, March 11th, 2010

Last May, our organization, Uri L’Tzedek, officially launched the Tav HaYosher – “ethical seal” – to certify kosher restaurants that uphold three basic employee rights: the right to fair time, the right to fair pay, and the right to a safe work environment.

As an Orthodox organization guided by Torah and dedicated to combating suffering and oppression, we are motivated by the Torah’s prohibition “You shall not oppress a hired servant who is poor and needy, whether he is of your brothers, or of your strangers who are in your land inside your gates.”

We hear the call in Tractate Bava Metzia that “all who withhold an employee’s wages, are as if they have taken a life.” We are inspired by the example of the Amora Rav, who instructed another sage to pay his employees even though they negligently broke a barrel of wine.

In America today, employee rights are egregiously violated; current enforcement structures simply do not work. Consider the results of a recent study of employees in Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles: 76 percent did not receive overtime as required by federal law; 26 percent received below minimum wage; 86 percent of workers did not receive full meal breaks, and a full 69 percent received no breaks whatsoever or had their breaks shortened by their employer.

When trying to stand up for these rights, nearly half, 43 percent, were the victims of illegal retaliatory measures: their employers fired or suspended them, cut their wages, or threatened to call immigration authorities.

The Jewish community cannot sit idly by pretending it is not our responsibility to uphold employee rights. In his landmark responsa, Rav Moshe Feinstein, zt”l, permitted drinking milk produced under the government’s watch since we can rely on the government to ensure no milk from a non-kosher animal is mixed with cow’s milk. Certainly Rav Moshe would never have done so if government oversight were seen as ineffective.

Since we cannot rely on the government to ensure restaurant employees aren’t oppressed we must find alternative mechanisms to guarantee that we aren’t mesayei l’yidei ovrei aveirah – assisting moral misconduct – when purchasing our food. The Tav HaYosher provides such a mechanism.

The Tav HaYosher’s mission, though, is to help all sides of the restaurant business. In these difficult economic times, employees and employers alike are struggling to find financial security. We work with restaurant owners as partners, because we recognize that abuse of rights has become such common practice that many owners fail to view their treatment of workers as unethical.

Moreover, paying all employees minimum wage and overtime can be expensive. For this reason, we work to publicize those restaurants with our Tav HaYosher ethical seal and encourage members of our community to patronize these restaurants. A positive campaign, we say absolutely nothing about restaurants we don’t certify.

A growing number of Jewish organizations are committing to having their lunch meetings and conferences catered by restaurants with our seals. As one kosher restaurant owner in New York reported back to us, “The Tav HaYosher is a tremendously effective marketing campaign. Since joining the Tav, we have received close to ten catering jobs we otherwise wouldn’t have had.” And as the popularity of the Tav HaYosher seal continues to grow, the added business generated by having the certification will only continue to increase.

In addition to bringing about practical change, another one of our goals is to publicly reaffirm the Jewish community’s understanding that ethical practices, in addition to ritual, are at the heart of Torah. Keeping kosher is one of the most public of Jewish actions. Through the Tav HaYosher, we proclaim, in an act of Kiddush Hashem, that worker treatment is also a core Jewish value, and we fulfill our Jewish obligation to abide by the law of the land (dina d’malchuta dina).

Since its inception less than a year ago, the Tav HaYosher has expanded exponentially. We’ve signed establishments in five states: New York, New Jersey, Maryland, Illinois and Pennsylvania, certifying more than 35 restaurants. In New York City alone we currently certify 23 eating establishments. We’ve received overwhelming support from many Jewish organizations, activists, and thousands of individuals who are committed either to buying exclusively from Tav-certified restaurants or to convincing their restaurants of choice to join the Tav.

A Jewish Call For Employee Rights

Thursday, March 11th, 2010

Last May, our organization, Uri L’Tzedek, officially launched the Tav HaYosher – “ethical seal” – to certify kosher restaurants that uphold three basic employee rights: the right to fair time, the right to fair pay, and the right to a safe work environment.

As an Orthodox organization guided by Torah and dedicated to combating suffering and oppression, we are motivated by the Torah’s prohibition “You shall not oppress a hired servant who is poor and needy, whether he is of your brothers, or of your strangers who are in your land inside your gates.”

We hear the call in Tractate Bava Metzia that “all who withhold an employee’s wages, are as if they have taken a life.” We are inspired by the example of the Amora Rav, who instructed another sage to pay his employees even though they negligently broke a barrel of wine.

In America today, employee rights are egregiously violated; current enforcement structures simply do not work. Consider the results of a recent study of employees in Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles: 76 percent did not receive overtime as required by federal law; 26 percent received below minimum wage; 86 percent of workers did not receive full meal breaks, and a full 69 percent received no breaks whatsoever or had their breaks shortened by their employer.

When trying to stand up for these rights, nearly half, 43 percent, were the victims of illegal retaliatory measures: their employers fired or suspended them, cut their wages, or threatened to call immigration authorities.

The Jewish community cannot sit idly by pretending it is not our responsibility to uphold employee rights. In his landmark responsa, Rav Moshe Feinstein, zt”l, permitted drinking milk produced under the government’s watch since we can rely on the government to ensure no milk from a non-kosher animal is mixed with cow’s milk. Certainly Rav Moshe would never have done so if government oversight were seen as ineffective.

Since we cannot rely on the government to ensure restaurant employees aren’t oppressed we must find alternative mechanisms to guarantee that we aren’t mesayei l’yidei ovrei aveirah – assisting moral misconduct – when purchasing our food. The Tav HaYosher provides such a mechanism.

The Tav HaYosher’s mission, though, is to help all sides of the restaurant business. In these difficult economic times, employees and employers alike are struggling to find financial security. We work with restaurant owners as partners, because we recognize that abuse of rights has become such common practice that many owners fail to view their treatment of workers as unethical.

Moreover, paying all employees minimum wage and overtime can be expensive. For this reason, we work to publicize those restaurants with our Tav HaYosher ethical seal and encourage members of our community to patronize these restaurants. A positive campaign, we say absolutely nothing about restaurants we don’t certify.

A growing number of Jewish organizations are committing to having their lunch meetings and conferences catered by restaurants with our seals. As one kosher restaurant owner in New York reported back to us, “The Tav HaYosher is a tremendously effective marketing campaign. Since joining the Tav, we have received close to ten catering jobs we otherwise wouldn’t have had.” And as the popularity of the Tav HaYosher seal continues to grow, the added business generated by having the certification will only continue to increase.

In addition to bringing about practical change, another one of our goals is to publicly reaffirm the Jewish community’s understanding that ethical practices, in addition to ritual, are at the heart of Torah. Keeping kosher is one of the most public of Jewish actions. Through the Tav HaYosher, we proclaim, in an act of Kiddush Hashem, that worker treatment is also a core Jewish value, and we fulfill our Jewish obligation to abide by the law of the land (dina d’malchuta dina).

Since its inception less than a year ago, the Tav HaYosher has expanded exponentially. We’ve signed establishments in five states: New York, New Jersey, Maryland, Illinois and Pennsylvania, certifying more than 35 restaurants. In New York City alone we currently certify 23 eating establishments. We’ve received overwhelming support from many Jewish organizations, activists, and thousands of individuals who are committed either to buying exclusively from Tav-certified restaurants or to convincing their restaurants of choice to join the Tav.

Chief Rabbi Battles Fraudulent Kosher Certifying Agencies

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2009

            While “going kosher” has become the hottest trend in the Israeli fast-food and gourmet restaurant industry, unscrupulous kashrut certifying agencies are systematically offering their sometimes fraudulent services to store owners in open violation of state laws. This mushrooming phenomenon, which has taken root in both large- and medium-size cities such as Jerusalem and Modiin, has defrauded both local consumers and foreign tourists alike.             During the past few months, Chief Rabbi Yona Metzger has spearheaded a new campaign to confront the growing number of store owners posting fraudulent certificates by threatening them with both legal action and alerting the public not to patronize their stores.             “The State of Israel treats kashrut fraud as a consumer issue – not a religious issue, which is a key element in enforcing regulations,” said Rafi Yochai, director of the Special State Bureau for Kashrut Enforcement in the Chief Rabbinate’s office. “You don’t have to be kosher if you don’t want to, as Israel is a democratic country. However, since at least 70-80 percent of the population wants to eat kosher products and this includes religious and non-religious Jews, then the minute an owner requests a kashrut certificate, the state gets involved.”

            Yochai traced the growing “keeping kosher” trend to changes within the local workforce, consumer demand for kosher products in Israel and abroad, as well as foreign tourism.

“The process started around 10-15 years ago when more and more religious people became hi-tech employees, lawyers, etc. Thus, these workers looked for places to eat lunch or dinner. It thus became profitable for these fast-food and restaurant owners to become kosher,” Yochai stated. “With more and more consumers in Israel and abroad looking for quality kosher products, non-kosher factories decided that in order to survive, they had to start producing kosher products. Almost everyone wants and needs kosher in Israel. And the explosive growth of the haredi population also created a large market for mehadrin products.”

            Thirty years ago, both the Chief Rabbinate and government of Israel began to understand that kashrut needed a legal structure in order to prevent outright fraud. Between 1980 and 1983, the Chief Rabbinate worked diligently with the Knesset to enact laws that would prevent fraud. Today, Israeli law stipulates that only the Chief Rabbinate is authorized to offer kashrut certificates to store owners, factories, supermarkets, hotels, hospitals, IDF, etc.

            The Chief Rabbinate also worked in tandem with several haredi badatzim (Beit Din Tzedek). “The Badatz hechsher actually began with a small group of batei din who for ideological reasons wanted to offer their own certification to their small communities on a select number of items, such as sugar, salt and flour. The certification was most certainly not part of a business formula,” Yochai recalled. “However, during the past decade as the kosher food and restaurant industry grew at a rapid pace, some so-called new ‘badatzim’ emerged to create a business element by offering their own Badatz or mehadrin certification.

 

Rav Metzger inspects both the pre and post shechita process at a chicken factory.

(Courtesy: Chief Rabbinate of Israel)

 

            “What do these people do? They walk into an establishment and ask the owner how much he is currently being charged for kashrut certification. In many cases, these unscrupulous people will ask for about 50 percent less than the going cost of a legitimate hashgacha and will give the store owner some fancy certificate to display in the window. Both the Chief Rabbinate and the legitimate Badatz hechsherim we work with suffer from this craziness. The consumer is scammed, while both the store owner and the fake kashrut certifier are perfectly satisfied. This is where the consumer kosher law is now being strictly enforced by the State of Israel.”

            Yochai maintains that the Chief Rabbinate is sympathetic to the many small business owners (e.g. managers of falafel and pizza stands) who might not be able to afford a full-time mashgiach to oversee a very limited amount of ingredients. “You don’t need a full-time mashgiach in a falafel store. What we do is, we check the ingredients served and then we provide a list of names of places that the Chief Rabbinate accepts for buying pita, chummus, salads etc. This way, everyone is happy.”

            However, Yochai reiterated that for the many foreign tourists who frequent falafel stores, supermarkets and restaurants, there are certain basic kashrut criteria that they should know about. These include:

 

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/food//2009/04/22/

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