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April 30, 2016 / 22 Nisan, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘restaurant’

China Beach: Delicious For Pesach And All Year

Thursday, March 22nd, 2012

China Beach Kosher Chinese restaurant is a wonderful place to dine for Pesach and year round. The restaurant, located at 3919 Alton Road in Miami Beach, is under the glatt kosher supervision of the KM, Kosher Miami.

A much anticipated Passover menu will be released soon and China Beach chefs promise a wide selection of scrumptious kasher l’Pesach choices.

The regular menu is full and every item is flavorful and fresh. The tasty appetizers and soups are a lovely start to a meal. Entrees include choices of well-prepared chicken and beef selections. Chop suey, lo mein, fried rice, tofu and vegetables are all mouth-watering. Noodle dishes are especially delightful. The children’s menu is yummy. Desserts are sweet and delicious.

China Beach offers lunch and dinner specials, family packs and Shabbat meals. Let them cater your next party or make a tray for a special occasion. Dine in or take out and take advantage of the convenient delivery service.

The restaurant will be open until 11 p.m. Thursday night, April 5, before the holiday. They will kasher and clean all the rest of that night, and reopen kosher for Pesach on Monday morning after the first two days of Yom Tov.

Call China Beach at 305-534-3034 for more information or to place an order.

Shelley Benveniste

Fine Dairy Dining at Café Muscat

Wednesday, February 1st, 2012

For the past six years, Café Muscat, located on Union Turnpike, in Fresh Meadows, Queens, has become a very popular spot in this particularly demanding neighborhood. You will not find bagels, cream cheese and lox on the menu of this restaurant.

Chef-owner Alon Assayag has reinvented the traditional and steers away from the usual dairy fare. He routinely triumphs in finding unique flavors and combinations that turn ordinary cuisine into innovative dishes.

Assayag, who has a French-Moroccan background, began his career in the food industry at age 13 in Israel. Although he has no formal training, his experiences throughout the years took him to a hotel in Eilat and finally to a place of his own in New York. He opened Café Muscat with partner Joseph Biton.

Of course, to truly appreciate the cuisine, one must eat it, and therein lies one of the most enjoyable tasks of this reviewer.

Alon Assayag of Café Muscat

From the very first glance at the menu, my dinner partner and I knew we were in for a treat. After studying the list of appetizers, we decided to begin the meal with the avocado eggroll and the Bulgarian eggplant. While we waited for the appetizers to arrive we enjoyed the warm, crusty loaves of bread served with an herb infused spread.

When I bit into the avocado eggroll, I was pleasantly surprised by the complexity of flavors. The expertly seasoned avocado, feta cheese and spices wrapped in a crispy eggroll shell merged together in every bite. The Bulgarian eggplant, which is prepared with cream sauce, mushroom, olives and cheese, was extremely tasty, but a bit too rich for my taste.

Next came our soup orders. I truly enjoyed the delicate blend of flavors in the butternut squash soup, prepared with garden fresh squash and aromatic spices. My companion, who chose the French onion soup topped with savory melted cheese, finished every last spoonful.

With the enduring popularity of sushi, it’s no wonder that the menu features such a large selection. We tasted the Fire Roll, a spicy tuna tempura with onion and jalapeno, which did not need the addition of soy sauce or condiment, since it was extremely flavorful on its own. Equally as impressive was the Captain Crunch tempura roll, a blend of salmon, imitation crab, avocado and cucumber. The sushi is so meticulously prepared and presented it intrigues the eye as well as satisfying the palate.

The dish of the night, however, was the superb fresh tuna fillet entrée, complemented by creamy whipped potatoes and steamed broccoli. I was very pleased with my choice, but after stealing a taste of the Atlantic sole that my companion ordered, I wanted to start all over again. The delectable fish, prepared in a butter sauce, was crisp on the outside and flaky on the inside.

When it comes to desserts, Café Muscat rises to the occasion. Although we were quite full by this time, we couldn’t pass up the luscious cheesecake and mouth watering French chocolate mousse. Assayag pointed out that the cakes are imported from Israel.

According to Assayag, one of the most popular choices on the menu is the Oreganatto salad. “These salads are large enough to be a main dish,” he comments. “They come topped with hot vegetables such as sweet potato, or asparagus. Many people never heard of these salads before, but when they taste it, they are very pleased.”

Once you eat in a dairy restaurant like Cafe Muscat, where do you go from there? There is pretty much something to suit every appetite. The menu includes several breakfast and brunch specials, sandwiches, wraps, panini toasts, salads, pastas, stir-fried dishes, an impressive selection of hot and cold drinks, as well as a children’s menu.

Café Muscat, located at 178-07 Union Turnpike, is under the supervision of the Vaad Harabonim of Queens. They open at 9:00 a.m. until midnight, Sunday-Thursday; Friday they close three hours before Shabbos and then reopen Saturday night, two hours after Shabbos.

 

Phyllis Hochberg currently works as a freelancer specializing in copy writing and public relations.
Contact: Phyllisfelice1212@gmail.com
Phyllis Hochberg

Title: Kosher Elegance

Tuesday, June 7th, 2011

Title: Kosher Elegance


Author: Efrat Libfroind


Publisher: Feldheim


 


 


   Kosher cookbooks have come a long way to being what women need. Flimsy paperbacks and poorly bound hard covers with yellowed, deteriorating pages that kept falling out have become beautiful, helpful and long-lasting. With Kosher Elegance, author Efrat Libfroind brings classic culinary skills to the table with clear directions and illustrative photos that portray aroma and taste. You’ll want to eat the pictures!

 

   The average Jewish female first tries her hand at cookery as a child. Many young ladies in the making will be able to succeed with adult assistance and the white chocolate and fruit cream dream on page 132. Their mothers will be hooked on rosemary cream cones at page 206. Once they’ve tasted those sweets, it’ll be time for dessert: meals to make everyone’s mouth water.

 

   Chicken basil cranberry rollups make you want to hurry up the holidays. They’re packed with good-for-you nutrition, beautiful to display, and satisfying. Vegetarians can enjoy meals of eggplant rollups with cashew, cheese and nut fillings, fried cannelloni filled with zucchini cream (yes, zucchini cream) and exotic cabbage salad among other appealing entrees.

 

   Beef, fish and poultry dishes abound with flair. Potato-chip chicken, stir-fry, sandwiches and skewered delights fill other colorful pages. The meals will appeal to diners of various ages and preferences. The at-a-glance photos inKosher Elegance will clue you in to that.

 

   It’s not hard to imagine someone opening a four-star restaurant or gaining a reputation as a fine cook based on the entrees in Kosher Elegance. The recipes are in chapters entitled “Sophistication,” “Occasions,” “Brunch,” “Hors D’oeuvres” (now you know how to spell it), “Layers,” “Simplicity,” “Sushi,” “Temptation” (that pretty much describes the whole book), and “Chocolate.” Study them to assess which ingredients and tools you’ll need to have in the kitchen when you prepare them. You might even indulge in what I did by buying pretty dishware for serving up specific selections.

 

   Feldheim bound the book to last a few generations. Be sure to cover it with weighted page protectors made for recipe books. Your sous-chefs de cuisine (kitchen helpers with fancy titles) and descendants will appreciate that.

 

 

   Yocheved Golani is the author of E-book “It’s MY Crisis! And I’ll Cry If I Need To: EMPOWER Yourself to Cope with a Medical Challenge”   (https://booklocker.com/books/3067.html)

Yocheved Golani

Husband Spending Too Much Time With Business Partner Of The Opposite Sex

Wednesday, December 15th, 2010

Question: I trust my husband implicitly. He has never given me reason to suspect him of wrongdoing. So, why am I writing? Three years ago he began a new job. He works very closely with a frum woman. They make a very good team – she is the salesperson and crucial to the business. A few months ago they started to train together to run in a half marathon for tzedakah. Then I found out that she and her husband had separated. I did not hear this from my husband – it was a friend who told me. When I asked my husband why he didn’t tell me, he said that she asked him not to tell anyone and he respected her privacy. Then I found out that they skipped a workout because of the rain and instead had lunch together. This I heard from a friend who saw them together. Please understand I don’t want to think he’s doing anything wrong. Surely he wouldn’t be in a restaurant for all to see if he was up to no good. He says I’m being overly sensitive. Is he right?

Answer: Let me begin by saying – stop trusting your husband implicitly. You said he’s never given you reason to suspect him of wrongdoing. Guess what? Now he has. I’m not a fan of any married person spending loads of time with a member of the opposite sex – alone – especially for extracurricular activities. Training for a half marathon means they have practice runs for at least an hour to start and eventually it will work itself up to two hours or more. As they jog they chat, laugh, discuss business; all the things you’d like to do with your husband but probably don’t have the time to. One of the reasons you don’t have that time is because he’s with her. It’s one thing to have a business relationship, and even that should be scrutinized, but this is a further step – and it’s dangerous. The number one place men meet the women they cheat with is at work, the number two place is while engaging in a hobby. Your situation rings both bells. Trust your intuition. If you are getting a sick feeling in the pit of your stomach over this, that tells you better than any list I could give you that something is up.

What may be confusing you is that you don’t want to believe your husband is physically cheating on you. But this doesn’t mean you should be ignoring his behavior. Unlike what many think, research has proven that the vast majority of men who cheat had an emotional relationship with the woman well before it became physical. Perhaps your husband is out in public with this woman because he hasn’t gone so far as to physically cheat, so he’s not hiding the relationship. However, this doesn’t mean he is not doing anything inappropriate. Spending hours of leisure time alone with her and having this emotional relationship is inappropriate. It is also likely to develop into an emotional bond that will threaten your marriage, regardless of whether he ever turns it into a physical affair. You have every right to be concerned.

Have a serious talk with him and explain that you want to feel closer to him. Let him know that you value your marriage and don’t want to take what seems to be the easy route of not confronting the situation. Tell him your frustration; don’t make it about this other woman as much as it being about the two of you. Both of you deserve to have more time together and should be working on how to make it happen. Maybe the two of you need a new hobby or exercise routine. Be willing to listen to what he’d like to do for fun and share your own ideas as well. You want to stop him from relating to this other woman, but you need to give him an outlet for this emotional energy. I’m not suggesting he’s missing something and you’re at fault. I’m suggesting that he’s acting inappropriately, but this emotional energy needs to find a home and it better be your home. You want to get your marriage back on track to where he’s getting this emotional bond and then some, with you.

Rabbi M. Gary Neuman

Kulinary Adventures Holds Second Tour

Thursday, November 4th, 2010

    Gourmet mouth-watering food, top notch cooking classes, a wine and cheese tasting, and exclusive tours of a kosher chocolate factory and Manhattan’s premier farmers’ market were on the menu and, in its first tour, Kulinary Adventures served up these and more.

 

    The kosher culinary tour company, launched earlier this year, conducted its inaugural tour on June 6 and 7. Participants hailed from as far away as Brazil, California, and Virginia, with New Yorkers and New Jerseyans also turning out for what was billed as a “one-of-a-kind” kosher foodie adventure.

 


Ahi tuna tartare in wonton cups, arranged on a

bed of sesame seeds with scallion flowers

 

 

    Featured chefs included Chef Shaya Klechevsky, chef instructor and owner of At Your Palate, the kosher gourmet catering company; Chef John Scoff, executive chef instructor from Home Cooking New York; and food stylist and Chef Lauren Braun Costello, the author of Notes on Cooking: A Short Guide to an Essential Craft.

 

    Among the featured recipes of Klechevsky’s class on French country cooking were crepes suzette and savory crepe recipes, as well as a watercress salad with goat cheese and lemon thyme vinaigrette.

 

    Scoff led the Kulinary Adventurers on a private tour of Manhattan’s Union Square greenmarket, and followed that up with a cooking class using fresh seasonal ingredients found at the market. The participants partook in fresh-from-the market roasted potatoes and fennel, sugar snap peas amandine, pan roasted chicken with sherry-thyme sauce and a fresh strawberry and rhubarb crumble.

 


Aron Ritter, president of the Kosher Wine Society,

leading a wine and cheese tasting

 

 

    Braun Costello’s food styling class included demonstrations on how to use ring molds, squeeze bottles, and a mandoline to turn ordinary plated food into a decorative culinary presentation.

 

    Participants also enjoyed a chef’s tasting lunch at Basil, a dairy restaurant located in Brooklyn, which was recently lauded in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times, among other publications.

 

    Although this was an inaugural tour, participants we spoke to raved about the balance of activities that the tour provided, which ranged from active cooking classes and tours to the more leisurely wine and cheese tasting and spa experience.

 

 


Chef Shaya Klechevsky demonstrates

French country cooking techniques

 

 

    One participant, Abby Robyn, joined the tour while on a visit from Los Angeles, CA. When asked about her experience, she replied, “What a wonderful culinary adventure! Excellent chefs with recipes for new dishes that I actually will make. And besides the great activities, such warm and interesting people in the group. I can’t recommend Kulinary Adventures highly enough.”

 

    Another participant, Miriam Rosenblum of East Brunswick, NJ, decided to come on Kulinary Adventures because of her love of good food and great cooking. She lauded Scoff, in particular, for his “extreme organized (style) and confidence, and the loads of useful tips and tidbits” he gave.

 

    Pearl Mann, of Woodmere, NY thought that “all of the presenters were excellent, knowledgeable, and personable” and added that she is now inspired to do more in the kitchen.

 

 

 

Kulinary Adventures participants at

Tumbador, the artisan chocolate factory

 

 

    Kulinary Adventures is planning a second tour, to take place on December 19 and 20. The upcoming tour’s cooking classes will focus on Italian and Levant (Sephardic) cuisines, respectively. In addition, a historical eating and walking tour of NYC’s Lower East Side will feature tastings and food history at local area establishments. There will also be a cookie decorating class, using the latest techniques in fondant and royal icing, as well as a wine and cheese tasting and several restaurant visits.

 

    Anyone interested in registering for the next tour should visit kulinaryadventures.com or call 646- 823-7529.

 

    All food served at Kulinary Adventures is supervised by Orthodox supervision agencies.

Paul Elliott

Kulinary Adventures Holds Second Tour

Thursday, November 4th, 2010

    Gourmet mouth-watering food, top notch cooking classes, a wine and cheese tasting, and exclusive tours of a kosher chocolate factory and Manhattan’s premier farmers’ market were on the menu and, in its first tour, Kulinary Adventures served up these and more.

 

    The kosher culinary tour company, launched earlier this year, conducted its inaugural tour on June 6 and 7. Participants hailed from as far away as Brazil, California, and Virginia, with New Yorkers and New Jerseyans also turning out for what was billed as a “one-of-a-kind” kosher foodie adventure.

 

Ahi tuna tartare in wonton cups, arranged on a

bed of sesame seeds with scallion flowers

 

 

    Featured chefs included Chef Shaya Klechevsky, chef instructor and owner of At Your Palate, the kosher gourmet catering company; Chef John Scoff, executive chef instructor from Home Cooking New York; and food stylist and Chef Lauren Braun Costello, the author of Notes on Cooking: A Short Guide to an Essential Craft.

 

    Among the featured recipes of Klechevsky’s class on French country cooking were crepes suzette and savory crepe recipes, as well as a watercress salad with goat cheese and lemon thyme vinaigrette.

 

    Scoff led the Kulinary Adventurers on a private tour of Manhattan’s Union Square greenmarket, and followed that up with a cooking class using fresh seasonal ingredients found at the market. The participants partook in fresh-from-the market roasted potatoes and fennel, sugar snap peas amandine, pan roasted chicken with sherry-thyme sauce and a fresh strawberry and rhubarb crumble.

 

Aron Ritter, president of the Kosher Wine Society,

leading a wine and cheese tasting

 

 

    Braun Costello’s food styling class included demonstrations on how to use ring molds, squeeze bottles, and a mandoline to turn ordinary plated food into a decorative culinary presentation.

 

    Participants also enjoyed a chef’s tasting lunch at Basil, a dairy restaurant located in Brooklyn, which was recently lauded in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times, among other publications.

 

    Although this was an inaugural tour, participants we spoke to raved about the balance of activities that the tour provided, which ranged from active cooking classes and tours to the more leisurely wine and cheese tasting and spa experience.

 

 

Chef Shaya Klechevsky demonstrates

French country cooking techniques

 

 

    One participant, Abby Robyn, joined the tour while on a visit from Los Angeles, CA. When asked about her experience, she replied, “What a wonderful culinary adventure! Excellent chefs with recipes for new dishes that I actually will make. And besides the great activities, such warm and interesting people in the group. I can’t recommend Kulinary Adventures highly enough.”

 

    Another participant, Miriam Rosenblum of East Brunswick, NJ, decided to come on Kulinary Adventures because of her love of good food and great cooking. She lauded Scoff, in particular, for his “extreme organized (style) and confidence, and the loads of useful tips and tidbits” he gave.

 

    Pearl Mann, of Woodmere, NY thought that “all of the presenters were excellent, knowledgeable, and personable” and added that she is now inspired to do more in the kitchen.

 

 

 

Kulinary Adventures participants at

Tumbador, the artisan chocolate factory

 

 

    Kulinary Adventures is planning a second tour, to take place on December 19 and 20. The upcoming tour’s cooking classes will focus on Italian and Levant (Sephardic) cuisines, respectively. In addition, a historical eating and walking tour of NYC’s Lower East Side will feature tastings and food history at local area establishments. There will also be a cookie decorating class, using the latest techniques in fondant and royal icing, as well as a wine and cheese tasting and several restaurant visits.

 

    Anyone interested in registering for the next tour should visit kulinaryadventures.com or call 646- 823-7529.

 

    All food served at Kulinary Adventures is supervised by Orthodox supervision agencies.

Paul Elliott

Going Uptown

Thursday, April 8th, 2010

I was walking down Coney Island Ave. when I saw an old acquaintance eating in a non-kosher restaurant. I wanted to approach him and ask him if he would be interested in putting on tefillin. But I felt hesitant, and wrestled internally to overcome my embarrassment. Finally I gathered enough confidence to enter the restaurant and approach my friend. Greeting him warmly, I gently asked if he would like to put on tefillin. He politely refused and, after a brief conversation, I was on my way.

A few minutes later, I received a phone call from someone asking for help with a computer problem. I intuitively felt that this phone call was somehow connected to what had just transpired. In truth I was not interested in taking this job, for the customer lived in uptown Manhattan, very far from Brooklyn. Yet I knew that this was from Hashem, and was directly connected to the incident in the restaurant.

I reluctantly agreed to travel uptown to fix this person’s computer, and spent the entire trip upset about the inconvenience. When I arrived, I noticed many mezuzahs on the doors in the apartment building, and when I arrived at my client’s door, I saw that he too had a mezuzah. It turned out that this individual was an Israeli.

After fixing his computer problem quickly and effortlessly, we chatted. I asked him if he would like to put on tefillin, and he unhesitatingly agreed.

I thought of the two incidents – so close to one another.

I felt like I had just lived through a living lesson. It is a merit to be given the opportunity to do a mitzvah. Sometimes, one has to make efforts to merit completing a holy task. So if you are encountering barriers to completing a mitzvah, don’t give up.

On the contrary, the difficulty should be an inspiration to make greater efforts. And those greater efforts will yield bountiful fruit.

Mordechai Krasnerman

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/jewish-columns/lessons-in-emunah/going-uptown/2010/04/08/

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