web analytics
May 24, 2015 / 6 Sivan, 5775
At a Glance
InDepth
Sponsored Post


Home » InDepth » Op-Eds »

The Paradox Of Israeli Politics: Vote Right, Get Left

Many supporters of Israel are bedeviled by a glaring contradiction in Israeli political life. How can it be that, regardless of which party wins an election, leftist policies are invariably implemented?

Since 1977 Likud has won several elections based on a platform of a Greater Israel. Nevertheless, it was under Likud Prime Minister Menachem Begin that the entire Sinai was relinquished.

There are many other substantive examples of leftist policies routinely supplanting right-wing electoral successes, but two in particular stand out:

1. Likud’s Ariel Sharon was elected prime minister on February 6, 2001 by a landslide margin. His win should have handed Sharon a mandate to govern from the right, regardless of outside pressures.

However, the policies of appeasement were in full swing during Sharon’s first year in office. The hawkish general nicknamed “the Bulldozer” was nowhere to be found as the Second Intifada raged.

It was only after Arab suicide bombings became more and more brazen and the death toll became intolerable to the general public that Operation Defensive Shield was belatedly launched on March 29, 2002.

2. Similarly, Sharon, who earlier in his career had been dubbed the “settlement builder,” executed the wholesale destruction of Gush Katif and communities in the northern Shomron, uprooting thousands of Jews from their homes.

The expulsion/destruction took place despite a Likud-led referendum (held only after a massive nationalist outcry) that should have halted the push toward “disengagement.” Sharon had promised to abide by the referendum but did no such thing.

How can this be? How can the wishes of an overwhelming majority of the electorate be so disregarded? How can leftist policies be implemented regardless of the preferences of most Israelis?

Israeli political scientist Dr. Martin Sherman, founder of the Israeli Institute for Strategic Studies, has written, “Although the right wing consistently wins elections, it never really gets into power. It is a phenomenon that can only be explained by the existence of some influence extraneous to the political system that imposes policy outcomes that diverge radically from those that should be expected from regular operation of political routine.”

Few understand just how pernicious an influence Israel’s ruling elites (many of whose institutions and endeavors are funded and fueled by foreign NGOs) have on virtually every aspect of Israeli public life. Unelected functionaries in the media, arts, and academia act as cheerleaders and enablers for rulings imposed by a generally left-wing court system. In turn, pressure is exerted on the political leadership to implement the court’s dictates.

Indeed, in a very real sense Israel’s court system has supplanted its legislature, a phenomenon I addressed in a July 22, 2011 Jewish Press op-ed article (“Justice in the Holy Land: Is It Ideologically Driven?”).

Israel’s policymaking and electoral system (one piggybacking on the other) must be overhauled. It is no doubt a Herculean task. Nevertheless, instead of lamenting that nothing can be done, those who care about Israel’s future must shoulder the burden. An accurate articulation of the situation, coupled with nation-saving policy strategies, can be found at Dr. Sherman’s policy institute site (www.martinsherman.net).

If all lovers of Zion were to become involved in fighting the hold exerted by unelected leftists on Israeli civic and political life, Israeli policies would finally reflect the will of the country’s non-leftist majority.

Adina Kutnicki comments on Israel-related issues for various media outlets. She made aliyah in 2008.

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

2 Responses to “The Paradox Of Israeli Politics: Vote Right, Get Left”

  1. Friends, my latest op-ed at The Jewish Press (and elsewhere).

  2. John Hug says:

    Another great insightful pearl of wisdom from Mrs. Kutnicki.

Comments are closed.

Current Top Story
Sha'ar Shechem / Damascus Gate. The Old City of Jerusalem.
Arab Stabs 2 Jewish Teens in Old City Terror Attack on Shavuot
Latest Indepth Stories
Harris-052215

We take a whole person approach, giving our people assistance with whatever they need.

Shalev and Rabbi Levinger

During my spiritual journey I discovered G-d spoke to man only once, to the Jewish people at Sinai

MK Moshe-Feiglin

20 years after the great Ethiopian aliyah, we must treat them like everyone else; no better or worse

Sprecher-052215

Connecting Bamidbar&Shavuot is simple-A world without Torah is midbar; with Torah a blessed paradise

Many Black protesters compared Baltimore’s unrest to the Palestinian penchant of terrorism & rioting

She credited success to “mini” decisions-Small choices building on each other leading to big changes

Shavuot 1915, 200000 Jews were expelled; amongst the largest single expulsions since Roman times

Realizing there was no US military threat, Iran resumed, expanded & accelerated its nuclear program

“Enlightened Jews” who refuse to show chareidim the tolerance they insist we give to Arabs sicken me

Somewhat surprisingly, the Vatican’s unwelcome gesture was diametrically at odds with what President Obama signaled in an interview with the news outlet Al Arabiya.

The recent solid victory of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s Likud Party produced something very different.

The reaction is so strong that nine times out of ten, parents engage in some form of coping mechanism before arriving at a level of acceptance of a special-needs diagnosis.

“…his neshamah reached out to us to have the zechus of Torah learning to take with him on his final journey.”

The gap isn’t between Israeli and American Jews-it’s between American Jews and the rest of the world

More Articles from Adina Kutnicki
9780988169197

Choosing Life in Israel evinces what it means to be emotionally, spiritually, and viscerally drawn, as a Jew, to the siren song emitted by Israel.

Many supporters of Israel are bedeviled by a glaring contradiction in Israeli political life. How can it be that, regardless of which party wins an election, leftist policies are invariably implemented?

Aside from the obvious looming dangers associated with a nuclear-armed Iran as well as attendant regional menaces, there exists an equally explosive strategic threat to Israel emanating from the country’s post-Zionist and anti-Zionist circles.

Daily newspapers in Israel have recently included an uptick in drunk driving related articles, invariably detailing the horrific carnage left in their wake.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/the-paradox-of-israeli-politics-vote-right-get-left/2012/04/25/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: