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May 30, 2015 / 12 Sivan, 5775
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A Word Is Worth 100,000 Shekels

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The rabbanit spoke with the woman for a while. She did not notice that the woman seemed a bit uncomfortable. While the rabbanit was unaware that Talia was the wife of the man who had cheated her husband, Talia assumed she knew.

When the women parted, Talia knew what she had to do. She immediately called her husband, who was in their hotel room.

“Yosef, you cannot believe who I just met. The rav’s wife is here at the conference. She spoke to me as if nothing was wrong between us. She didn’t show anger at all. How can we live with ourselves after what we did to the rav and his family? You must make things right.”

And that’s just what Yosef did. He went to the bank and renegotiated a payment schedule he could afford. He then went to see the rav and apologized profusely for his trickery. He repaid the rav for the money he had already given the bank.

The moral of the story: A picture may be worth 1,000 words, but one word not spoken may be worth 100,000 shekels.

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