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August 27, 2015 / 12 Elul, 5775
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A Time To Throw Away

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The great Shlomo HaMelech, wisest of all men, wrote that there is a time for all things. There is a time to be born and a time to die, a time to cry and a time to laugh, a time to preserve and a time to throw away.

When one thinks of these words he soon realizes the wisdom that lies in them. Everything in this world had its place – even seemingly foolish things. Here is a story that clearly brings out this lesson.

 

Eliphelet

In the city of Bais Lechem there once lived a very wealthy man by the name of Eliphelet. He had amassed a great fortune through his wisdom and business knowledge. He was also blessed with an only son whom he loved very much.  The lad, whose name was Yigal, was a good son who loved G-d devotedly and who spent his days in the study of Torah. He was devoted to his parents, respecting them in every way and was generous and kind to all who were in need.

As the years passed, Yigal grew into a handsome, wise and fine young man. One day, he approached his father and said: “It is time that I began to learn something about your business. Allow me to go with you on your next trip across the seas. There I can see the wondrous lands where you buy and sell, and I, too, can learn to be great merchant.”

“What you say is right, Yigal,” replied his father. “It is indeed time that you began to learn. On my next trip you shall come with me.”

 

An Ocean Voyage

Yigal could barely contain his excitement and impatience as he waited for the great day to arrive. Together with his father, Yigal went to the dock to board a ship that would take them across the seas to wonderful and strange lands and peoples.

Yigal stood on deck, his eyes shining with excitement as he looked out at the gently rolling waves and dreamed of the adventures that awaited him. His father, however, had his mind on other, more serious things.

He had noticed the captain and the crew eyeing him and Eliphelet felt a sense of foreboding crept over him. Stealing away as evening fell, he crept into the hold of the ship and silently listened as two crewmen spoke to each other:

“The captain insists that the older Jew is a man of great wealth. He says that his pockets are lined with money and that he would be an easy prey.”

“What does he plan to do?” asked the other.

“Tomorrow afternoon we will pounce upon the two Jews and kill them. We will then divide their money and no one will ever be the wiser for their bodies will never be found.”

 

A Plan

When Eliphelet heard this, he trembled and prayed to G-d: “Father in Heaven, be with me in my time of terrible danger.”

Leaving his hiding place he sought out Yigal, who was calmly resting and learning. Coming close, Eliphelet saw that his son was learning Koheles and was reading the verse that says: “There is a time to preserve and a time to throw away.”

Suddenly a thought entered his mind. Of course, that was the way. It could yet save their lives. Approaching his son, Eliphelet whispered: “Listen, my son, we are in great danger.”

“What do you mean, Father? What has happened?” Yigal asked anxiously.

“Do not raise your voice,” Eliphelet cautioned. “If they hear us, we are doomed. I have just learned that the captain and sailors intend to kill us and take our money.”

“Woe unto us,” cried Yigal. “What can we do?”

“There may be an answer, and it is a thing that I thought of as I read the verse in Koheles. We must pretend that we are quarreling over the money. I will then begin to grapple with you, seize the bag of gold that we have and throw it in the sea. Perhaps then the captain will see that we are poor and that it is pointless for him to kill us.”

 

The Plan Succeeds

“Very well,” replied Yigal. “We have little choice but to follow your plan. May the Almighty be with us in this time of our great danger.”

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