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September 1, 2014 / 6 Elul, 5774
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Getting The Interview, And The Job

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Watch your weakness. Interviewers are often wary of people who answer, “What is your weakness?” with “I am a perfectionist” or “I work too hard.” Those answers seem disingenuous and often make the interviewee appear insincere. Instead, really think about what flaw you have. Then, think about what you can do to improve that flaw. Then, when your interviewer asks you what your flaw is, you can answer with both the problem and the solution.

Pick your passion. Think about what you love and why. Then, consider all the different projects or activities you have done because of that passion. This way, when you are interviewing for the job, you will be able to individualize yourself and show your unique personality through your passion. Of course, ensure that that passion matches the demands of the job in some way.

Don’t forget to sell yourself. The interview is not the time to be humble – rather it is your time to shine! Develop a short (less than one minute) “pitch” that explains why you are wonderful. In business, this is called an “elevator speech” – something you could quickly say to someone if you bump into him or her in an elevator. This should include your strengths, your abilities, and what sets you apart from other applicants.

After your interview, follow up. Write a thank you note or friendly email expressing your appreciation for the time the interviewer spent with you. Don’t forget to include a personal touch, mentioning a specific highlight of the interview. This way, your interviewer will remember you as a unique individual. In addition, restate your interest in the position. Everyone wants to know that you are still invested.

Remember that every job interview, regardless of the outcome, is a learning experience. Even if you do not get the job, you will be better prepared for the next interview. So, relish the experience and learn from both your successes and your failures!

About the Author: An acclaimed educator and education consultant, Mrs. Rifka Schonfeld has served the Jewish community for close to thirty years. She founded and directs the widely acclaimed educational program, SOS, servicing all grade levels in secular as well as Hebrew studies. A kriah and reading specialist, she has given dynamic workshops and has set up reading labs in many schools. In addition, she offers evaluations G.E.D. preparation,, social skills training and shidduch coaching, focusing on building self-esteem and self-awareness. She can be reached at 718-382-5437 or at rifkaschonfeld@verizon.net. Visit her on the web at rifkaschonfeldsos.com.


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