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September 22, 2014 / 27 Elul, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘concept’

Gas Mask Distribution

Monday, August 20th, 2012

http://israelisoldiersmother.blogspot.co.il/2012/08/gas-mask-distribution.html

Israel seems to have gone into high gear in its plans to distribute gas masks to all its citizens. For days and days, there are long lines as people wait to receive theirs. In some cases, like us, the old ones need to be returned. This is all so very hi-tech. There is an efficiency there – that is belied by what is happening. No one in line has any doubt that this is because of Iran – it is that elephant in the corner; that massive threat just around the bend.

We found our gas masks over the weekend – gone was any opportunity to put this off any further. Elie and Lauren and I drove to Talpiot, a neighborhood in the southern part of Jerusalem. We parked, walked upstairs, and right away saw that there were hundreds of people there waiting. It was a mix of so many things.

One security guard was calling out numbers…620…621…622…623. We were 791 until the man in front of us pulled out a bunch of tickets and gave us 790. He’d found an ticket with a lower number and planned to cut forward in the sequence. He was 686. Apparently the woman in front of him had the same idea. She saw us standing there – and handed us 671 – we went in front of 686. He was philosophical – what he had done to others was just done to him…not much he could complain about.

Of course, he then pulled in the ace of his deck – he pulled out his handicapped ID and asked the guard if he could please advance. Two points to him…he went to the front of the line. Things moved amazingly fast – we were ushered forward to stand on one side of the table. We handed in the old gas masks – it pulled something inside of me when I saw him count them and toss them aside.

He asked for my identification card, and with that, determined that he could give me 5 gas masks – mine, my husband’s, Elie’s, Davidi’s and Aliza’s. “What about Shmulik and Amira?” I asked him. “I gave you seven.”

“Wait,” he told me as he began. He pulled out a box, plugged in a number, and wrote my husband’s name on the box. He then used an infrared scanner to go over the bar code – all so efficient. We’re talking gas masks here! But that was for later. This was about processing people – not about politics or global threats by a madman.

“I have Shmulik’s teudat zehut [identification card] with me,” I continued.

“Wait,” said Elie.

The man gave me another gas mask – for me; one for Elie; one for Davidi; one for Aliza – her box was a different color and was larger – because while the rest of us have adult gas masks, she has the “youth” size.

He took Shmulik’s identification card and began processing it, “what about Amira?” I asked him again. Yes, I wasn’t handling this particularly well, was I?

“Wait,” the man said to me again – and I have to admit, there was patience in his voice each time. The woman next to me started arguing. She wanted to get someone else’s gas mask and the man told her she first had to call the Home Front office. She complained that she had been there more than 2 hours already and wasn’t leaving without the additional gas mask. She was very upset – again, the man taking care of me spoke to her calmly.

My mind was already racing with arguments if he wouldn’t give me the last gas mask – which was silly, I kept telling myself. Even if they give me Amira’s, she still has to come back for her husband and her son. When he finished Shmulik’s gas mask – I had six boxes. “Amira?” I asked him again. Clearly, my brain had no intention of listening to my heart.

“Which one?” he asked me and I showed him.

He plugged in her identification number and went to get a box. I was so relieved – ridiculously so. “Haim didn’t turn in his old one,” he told me (referring to Amira’s husband), but I can give you one for the baby.

Olympic Runners Would Die…

Sunday, August 12th, 2012

http://israelisoldiersmother.blogspot.co.il/2012/08/olympic-runners-would-die.html

Olympic runners would die if they lived in Shderot and a rocket hit.

What an amazing concept – the fastest men in the world…wouldn’t reach safety if they found themselves just 200 meters away from a shelter during a Color Red alarm in Shderot. Fifteen seconds of warning…that’s all the residents there have.

I wonder if anyone in the Olympics has thought of this comparison – one that people in Israel’s south live with every day. Thank you to the IDF for the above thought…it is a chilling one.

The Olympic Story that Wasn’t News

Tuesday, July 31st, 2012

If you buy into the concept that news is not news unless it is covered by the major media players, than I guess the fact that the Lebanese judo team refused to practice next to the Israeli team until the Olympic organizers erected barriers to divide the room and place the Israelis out of sight…wasn’t news.

After all, a quick review of CNN and the New York Times came up with nothing about this story. That’s right – the search turned up nothing.

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Guess it wasn’t news enough after all, no one was massacred other than the Olympic spirit.

BBC, on the other hand, did choose to cover the story – in typical BBC fashion. You have to hand it to them – I can’t help but wonder how long it took them to come up with a headlines that would imply somehow that the Israelis are to blame.

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There you go, “Israeli Olympic team says Lebanese judo fighters refuse to train next to them.” One would think that the Olympic officials would have gone over to the Lebanese to confirm this before spending time and effort erecting a screen between them. And one has to wonder why the Israelis went over to the Olympic officials to act as agents of the Lebanese.

Logically, one would assume that the Lebanese went to the Olympic officials. Judging by the incredible bravery of the Olympic officials in caving in to every demand of the Arab nations – not wanting to insult them by honoring the murdered ISRAELI athletes, etc. etc. – one would assume they quickly built the demanded screens based on the Lebanese request. So what exactly did the Israelis do in this?…Ah yes, perhaps they were the ones who refused to remain silent at having, yet again, Arabs murder the Olympic spirit.

That’s right – thankfully, no Israeli lives have been lost at the Olympics, but the Olympic spirit took another beating as the Olympic officials gave in and allowed this apartheid wall to be built. No wait, that isn’t quite accurate – they didn’t ALLOW it to be built…they built it.

So, once again – BBC can’t take all the glory in the shame. This one must be shared jointly – with CNN and the New York Times for not covering the story at all, and with the Olympic organizers who once again caved in to the twisted logic that allows the Palestinians to say holding a moment of silence for the Israelis murdered by Palestinian terrorists is racism but building a wall between the Lebanese and the Israelis is acceptable.

Olympic spirit? Brotherhood of sports? Unity among nations? What a farce!

Open Skies

Tuesday, July 31st, 2012

I spent nearly half an hour in search of an image that would best illustrate the concept of an open sky policy, in a way that expresses the yearning of the average citizen of this planet to go places for a while, if only it didn’t entail getting so deep in debt they won’t see the sky again until next summer. I think this one does the job in a strange and immediately understood way.

Now the story – and remember, I could have just picked up a picture of an airplane either on the tarmac or in the air, or a bunch of planes in all kinds of weird positions – and you would have given it a glance and moved on. This image, on the other hand, is worth watching for a while.

OK, now the story.

The Ministry of Tourism’s initiative from 2006, which has led to thorough discussions lasting a number of years (6), has led Israel and the European Union to initial on Monday morning the Open Skies Agreement.

Israeli Minister of Tourism Stas Misezhnikov, who supported the initiative and was active in promoting it, congratulated the signing of the agreement, saying it is “an essential move that will jumpstart tourism to Israel by hundreds of thousands, and will bring about a decrease in fares for the Israeli consumer as well.”

Misezhnikov pointed out that Israel’s joining the European club will bring new and varied opportunity for new players in the airline industry as well, which will promote competition. Nevertheless, he cautioned, “the state must find a way to ensure support for the Israeli airline companies within the new agreement.”

Open skies is an international policy concept that calls for the liberalization of the rules and regulations of the international aviation industry—especially commercial aviation—in order to create a free-market environment for the airline industry.

Baseless Hatred: What It Is and What You Can Do About It

Tuesday, July 17th, 2012

Baseless Hatred: What It Is and What You Can Do About It, a new book by Dr. Rene Levy, tackles a problem that has plagued the Jewish people from very early on in their history; the destructive aspects of which have been responsible for some of their greatest historical calamities and continue to threaten the unity of the Jewish people today.

Levy, a Professor of Pharmaceutics and Neuropharmacology at the University of Washington, calls on his background in the sciences to explain a domain that ” remains largely enigmatic and lacking a strong empirical foundation.”

The book begins by delving into the original concept of baseless hatred - sinat chinam - as introduced by the sages of the Talmud in the context of the destruction of the Second Temple and the exile of the Jewish people from the Land of Israel. What is the causal link between calamities of historical proportions and a behavior like baseless hatred, Levy asks? “How could a whole people be defeated and become homeless just for that reason?”

In the chapters that follow, Levy offers an approach to understanding the phenomenon of baseless hatred, elaborating on the main characteristics of hate as described by psychologists and neurobiologists. He notes too that “Jewish tradition has a deep interest in and appreciation of the human emotion of hatred.”

The next portion of the book is dedicated to what Levy terms the antidote – ‘arevut,‘ the concept of mutual responsibility, and he expounds on this concept in a thorough yet accessible manner. Moving from the abstract to the concrete, Levy offers compelling thoughts on whether the end of exile – the founding of the state of Israel in 1948 – has also meant the end of sinat chinam among the Jewish people.

The last two chapters provide a step-by-step approach for individuals to utilize in preventing new episodes of baseless hatred and in repairing existing ones.

The book has received widespread praise from across the spectrum, including the Chief Rabbi of France Gilles Bernheim, who wrote the preface to the book, and the current Israeli minister of Justice Yaakov Neeman, who said: “Don’t read this book. Study it.”

At a time when the state of Israel is struggling with an internal and often divisive national debate over universal service for all of its citzens, this cogently written and thought-provoking book could not come at a more relevant time.

Origins of Internationalization

Sunday, July 8th, 2012

(((CLICK BELOW TO HEAR AUDIO)))

Yishai presents a recent presentation that he gave to the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem about the concept of creating an ‘international city’ in Jerusalem which would remove Jewish control from the city. Yishai discusses the origins of the idea and exactly how he sees fault in this concept.

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
Yishai on Facebook

Shelichus

Thursday, June 21st, 2012

The Gemara in Kiddushin 41b derives from a pasuk in this week’s parshah the concept of shelichus (acting on one’s behalf). The pasuk says, “kein tarimu gam atem terumas Hashem – so you too shall remove the terumah of Hashem.” The Gemara explains that the word gam (too) is superfluous; thus we draw from this that another person may remove terumah for you on your behalf.

The Gemara in Baba Metzia 22a says that, based on this pasuk, we learn another halacha regarding shelichus. The Gemara says that just as an action that you perform is with your knowledge, so too is it with your knowledge when your agent acts on your behalf. One cannot be your shaliach unless you know about it.

The Kitzos Hachoshen (105:1) asks the following fundamental question (preceded by pertinent information): There is another manner, referred to as zicheya, whereby one can act on another person’s behalf. Regarding this other form, the Gemara says that one may act on another’s behalf even without the knowledge of the other person. This is called zachin l’adam shelo befanav – one may acquire for another if it is beneficial for him, even if he does not know it. Several Rishonim opine that the mechanics behind this form of acting on another person’s behalf works with shelichus. Rashi in Gittin 9b says that whenever one is acting on another person’s behalf, it is considered as if he was appointed to be a shaliach (to do that action) for the sender. This is called zicheya mi’din shalichus. The Kitzos asks: How can zicheya work without the individual’s knowledge if it is working via the mechanics of shalichus, and shelichus requires the knowledge of the one for whom you are acting?

The Kitzos suggests that this is the reason that the other Rishonim disagree and say that zicheya is not mi’din shelichus. They say that it works instead through the halacha of yad, the fact that one’s hand acquires for him. The Kitzos goes so far as to say that even the Rishonim who say that that zicheya is mi’din shalichus do not mean that it is considered as if one made him an agent; rather, it is a gezeiras hakasuv (it works just as a shaliach works).

One could argue with the entire premise of the Kitzos. We must look at the context in which the Gemara in Baba Metzia was referring to, namely that one must be aware that there is an agent working on his behalf. The Gemara there was discussing the sugya of yi’ush shelo midas – relinquishing ownership of a lost object without the knowledge that it is lost. Rashi, at the beginning of the sugya, writes that the whole sugya is only addressing a scenario in which one would probably give up hope when he learns that the item is missing. In a scenario whereby we know for certain that one would give up hope, there would not be any machlokes and all would agree that it now works – prior to the individual actually knowing.

The Gemara brings a proof from the following Mishnah: In a case of one who takes off terumah for his friend without his friend’s knowledge, there are scenarios in which it works and those in which it is not considered as if terumah was removed. If the owner, upon hearing that his fellow removed terumah for him, responds in a manner that reveals that he is pleased, the terumah is then valid. But if his response tells us that he is upset about this, the terumah is not valid. The Gemara says that this proves that even though he did not know at the time, it is valid retroactively since he later knew about it. The same rule should apply regarding the relinquishment of ownership of a lost item.

The Gemara answers that there is no proof from this Mishnah, since the entire Mishnah is referring to a case where the owner had previously made him his shaliach.

The Gemara compares the knowledge required for yi’ush to that of a shaliach. The parallel dictates that just as if one does not know that his item is lost, even though he will probably relinquish his ownership when he learns that it is lost, we do not consider it as if he gave up hope. Similarly, even if one will probably be happy to learn that his fellow separated terumah for him, it is not considered as if he made him his shaliach since he does not presently know.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/parsha/shelichus/2012/06/21/

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