web analytics
April 23, 2014 / 23 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Jimmy Carter’

Help The Monitor Decide

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009

Beginning in 2005 the Monitor has awarded annual recognition to a Jewish individual who, by his or her statements, displays contempt for the Jewish people, disregard for historical truth, a desire to sup at the table of Israel’s enemies, or who otherwise plays into the hands of the enemies of Jews and Israel.

As can be imagined, such a decision is hardly an easy one, what with the seemingly inexhaustible supply of Jews given to fatuous and foolish pronunciamentos. We call our little honor the Henry Schwarzschild Award, named after the late civil liberties activist (he did in 1996) who, in the wake of the Israeli siege of Beirut in the summer of 1982, wrote a letter to the journal Sh’ma in which he renounced Israel, declared himself its enemy, and termed the creation of the Jewish state “a tragedy of historical dimensions.”

In the past the Monitor chose each year’s honoree with no input from readers. This year we’re inviting readers to send in their nominees, along with the offending quote(s) made by those nominees during calendar year 2008. The winner of the Schwarzschild Award is announced in January or February, so readers have until the end of the year to submit their suggestions.

The winner of the Monitor’s first Schwarzschild Award (for the year 2004) was Uri Avnery, the granddad of Israel’s hard-core Left. In an interview with Haaretz shortly after the death of Yasir Arafat, Avnery waxed lyrical about the wonderful qualities he’d found in the terror chief who championed and orchestrated the killing of countless men, women and children.

The second Schwarzschild Award went to ADL National Director Abraham Foxman, who, in a speech at the ADL’s national conference, tore into the Christian Right – Israel’s most faithful support group in the U.S. outside the Jewish community (actually, some would argue, more faithful than the Jewish community itself) for what he described as its efforts “to ‘Christianize’ all aspects of American life, from the halls of government to the libraries, to the movies, to recording studios, to the playing fields and locker rooms of professional, collegiate and amateur sports, from the military to SpongeBob SquarePants.”

The third annual Schwarzschild Award went to Michael Lerner, publisher of the far-left Tikkun magazine, who took offense at the widespread negative reaction among supporters of Israel to Jimmy Carter’s atrocious book Palestine: Peace Not Apartheid.

“Jimmy Carter,” wrote Lerner, “was the best friend the Jews ever had as president of the United States…. Carter is speaking the truth as he knows it, and doing a great service to the Jews. It’s time to create a new openness to criticism and a new debate. Jimmy Carter has shown courage in trying to open that kind of space with his new book, and he deserves our warm thanks and support.

The winner of the Monitor’s fourth Schwarzschild Award was Haaretz editor David Landau, who told Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice that Israel needed to be “raped” by the United States, adding, in sexual terminology too vulgar to repeat in a family newspaper, that conveying this sentiment to her had always been his fantasy.

Actor Ed Asner won the fifth annual Schwarzschild Award. A hard core leftist, Asner last year took up the cause of Israelis who refuse to serve in the IDF, penning an article that appeared on The Huffington Post and other left-leaning websites and blogs in which he approvingly cited the “courage” of Omer Goldman, a young Israeli woman who has already served two terms in an Israeli military jail for, in Asner’s words, “standing up to the government.”

Asner excitedly quoted Goldman’s observation that “the most dangerous thing in Palestine is the Israeli soldiers, the very people who are supposed to be on my side” and then offered his own bit of wisdom: “I find it hard to believe than anyone can look Omer in the eye and tell her that she has to risk her life and her future for Israel whether she wants to or not. It’s just not right. Especially during this time of year [Chanukah] when many of us are getting ready to celebrate a holiday about freedom….”

Who will be honored with the sixth annual Schwarzschild Award? Please help the Monitor decide.

Jason Maoz can be reached at jmaoz@jewishpress.com

‘The Highest Office’

Wednesday, November 12th, 2008

     The recent presidential election has caused terrible angst for some voters and incredible joy for others. However, American history has shown that no matter who is elected to the oval office, the fundamental principles of the country are sound, and life carries on. 

     Power in the United States regularly bounces from Republican to Democrat like a lively ping-pong game. Many new presidents are, in fact, elected as a protest vote against the previous regime. In a country that is governed by checks and balances, the volley of parties does not do permanent harm. 

    The United States staggered under the shock of Richard Nixon’s Watergate scandal and consequently elected Jimmy Carter. It was humiliated by Carter’s inept handling of the hostages in Iran and elected Ronald Reagan. It was scandalized by the shenanigans of Bill Clinton’s high-risk, inappropriate romances and elected George W. Bush. Yet, through it all, the nation remained strong.

    The people of America reeled under the attack of 9/11 and its aftermath. Perhaps everything that followed was not handled to perfection. It is very easy to be a Monday- morning quarterback. However, despite the mistakes of the president or officials in charge, our country has pulled through a terrible trauma. We are intact.   

   There seems to be a pattern to life, which belies the idea that we, alone, decide our destiny. Perhaps the answer is that we are not the sole arbitrator of what happens, despite our greatest efforts. Of course, we are mandated to do our best to put things in place.  However, it seems that man can never really hold the “highest office.”

    So hang in there. There are lessons to be learned. There are experiences to be had.  There is a lot to process.  Gam zu l’tovah, everything is for the best! 

Rebuked By The Jimmy Carter Fan Club

Wednesday, March 21st, 2007

A couple of recent columns that were less than laudatory to the 39th president of the United States provoked some interesting reader responses. If laughter is indeed the best medicine, the Monitor ought to bottle this stuff.

Here’s an e-mail from Betty G., who says a friend e-mailed her one of the Monitor’s anti-Carter pieces and prefaces her remarks about Carter with a rant against Orthodox Jews for “ruining Israel.”

For the first twenty years or so of its existence, Betty explains, “Israel was a secular country which, while throwing a bone or two to the religious element on things like Sabbath observance and kashruth, was by and large defined by its vibrant, freethinking, secular populace. This has changed dramatically over the past couple of decades with the growth of the Orthodox and their increasing stranglehold over important Israeli institutions, including the IDF.”

As for Carter, the comic-book character Betty Cooper never swooned over Archie Andrews as embarrassingly as our Betty swoons over the liver-lipped scold from Plains:

“President Carter is my definition of a real man: Forthright, fair-minded, honest, of high moral character, and just plain good. He commands your respect. He has an air of masculine authority seasoned with an endearing trace of humility. When I see him on TV, I can swear there’s a glow emanating from him.”

Whew! Someone’s apparently been reading a tad too many romance novels. Reader, despite what many may choose to believe, the Monitor is not without compassion. A prompt response went out to Betty recommending a therapeutic cold shower and suggesting she submit to a thorough eye examination or have her TV checked – preferably both.

Next up is Martin K., whose rich imagination is filled with images of Fireman Jimmy carrying him out of a burning building and Skipper Jimmy rescuing him from a remote desert isle and…oh, dear, the Monitor doesn’t like where this is going:

“First,” writes Martin, “you trash President Carter in your Media Monitor column of Nov. 24 (“Jimmy Carter’s Jewish Problem”) and then you have the nerve to rank him as the worst president ever in terms of his relationship with Israel (“Ranking the Presidents”) in your Jan. 12 column. How dare you?

“I would trust my safety and the safety of the Jewish people with Jimmy Carter any day of the week over any and all of the presidents you rank ahead of him. If I were trapped in a fire and had to pick a president to get me to safety, my choice would be President Carter. If I were stranded on a desert island and had the choice of any president to keep me company and figure a way out, it would be President Carter hands down.”

The Monitor thought it best not to respond to Martin. Nothing concrete, mind you, just a hunch.

Lawrence W., a self-described progressive who considers himself “a citizen of the world rather than of a particular country and a member of the human race first, Jewish race second,” combines an encomium to Carter with an attack on Israel:

“I was never so proud to be an American as I was when Jimmy Carter was president,” Lawrence informs us. “Mr. Carter is a great humanitarian whose heart goes out to the stateless Palestinians who are herded like zoo animals behind the security wall; harassed at checkpoints; humiliated in countless ways, small and large, on a daily basis; killed indiscriminately every time the IDF decides to mount an incursion onto Palestinian territory; forced to live lives of poverty and misery because the Israelis refuse to grant them the same sovereignty that we Jews begged, pleaded and prayed for during the course of our exile.”

Finally, we hear from Louise P., someone who appears to confuse Judaism with something she read in a New York Times editorial or quite possibly heard from some Reform rabbi named Ellen at a community center kumzitz:

“Being pro-Israel does not mean kowtowing to Israeli politicians – it means insisting that Israel behave like an ethical nation, seeking peace, agreeing to compromise, and being a ‘light unto the nations’ by following the precepts of Tikkun Olam on which the Torah is based. So, according to our own tradition, there is no one more pro-Israel than Jimmy Carter.”

The Schwarzschild Award

Wednesday, January 24th, 2007

The winner of the Monitor’s third annual Henry Schwarzschild Award for most offensive comments by a Jew in the public spotlight goes to Michael Lerner, publisher of the far-left Tikkun magazine.

The prize, which last year went to Anti-Defamation League National Director Abraham Foxman and the year before that to Israeli uber-leftist Uri Avnery, is awarded to the person who, in the Monitor’s considered opinion, by his or her statements displays a contempt for the Jewish people, a disregard for historical truth, a desire to sup at the table of Israel’s enemies, or who otherwise plays into the hands of the enemies of Jews and Israel.

Before we get to Lerner’s words of wisdom, a little something about Henry Schwarzschild and why a prize like this deserves to bear his name.

Schwarzschild, who died in 1996, was a longtime activist in groups like the American Civil Liberties Union and Jewish Peace Fellowship. In the wake of the Israeli siege of Beirut in the summer of 1982, he wrote a public letter of resignation from the editorial advisory board of the journal Sh’ma – a letter that will stand in perpetuity as a monument to the unimaginable neuroses and insecurities of a secular leftist.

Schwarzschild’s main points:

For a generation now, I have been deeply troubled by the chauvinistic assumptions and repressive effects of Israeli nationalism. I have experienced the War on Lebanon of the past few weeks as a turning point in Jewish history and consciousness exceeded in importance only by the End of the Second Commonwealth and the Holocaust. I have resisted the inference for over thirty years, but the War on Lebanon has now made clear to me that the resumption of political power by the Jewish people after two thousand years of diaspora has been a tragedy of historical dimensions….

I will not avoid an unambiguous response to the Israeli army’s turning West Beirut into another Warsaw Ghetto. I now conclude and avow that the price of a Jewish state is, to me, Jewishly unacceptable and that the existence of this (or any similar) Jewish ethnic religious nation state is a Jewish, i.e. a human and moral, disaster and violates every remaining value for which Judaism and Jews might exist in history.

The lethal military triumphalism and corrosive racism that inheres in the State and in its supporters (both there and here) are profoundly abhorrent to me. So is the message that now goes forth to the nations of the world that the Jewish people claim the right to impose a holocaust on others in order to preserve the State….I now renounce the State of Israel, disavow any political connection or emotional obligation to it, and declare myself its enemy….

Schwarzschild’s reprehensible screed was immediately published in the leftist Nation magazine (then and now the most anti-Israel mainstream political publication in America) and for better than two decades has remained a favorite of Jews on the Left. Tony Kushner (Steven Spielberg’s screenwriter for “Munich”) and Alisa Solomon thought so much of it that they included it in Wrestling with Zion, a compilation of essays by leftists struggling with their ambivalence toward Israel.

On to Michael Lerner, who back in December was all lathered up over widespread negative reaction among supporters of Israel to Jimmy Carter’s atrocious new book, Palestine Peace Not Apartheid. According to Lerner:

Jimmy Carter was the best friend the Jews ever had as president of the United States…. In an interview that will appear in the January issue of Tikkun magazine, Carter points out that he is “not referring to racism as a basis for Israeli policy in the West Bank, but rather the desire of a minority of Israelis to occupy, confiscate and colonize the West Bank.”…. What Carter is arguing is that the best interests of Israel and the United States are not served by the current policies…. Jimmy Carter is speaking the truth as he knows it, and doing a great service to the Jews…. It’s time to create a new openness to criticism and a new debate. Jimmy Carter has shown courage in trying to open that kind of space with his new book, and he deserves our warm thanks and support.

So there it is. In Lerner’s world, the more someone lambastes Israel, the more someone speaks disparagingly of Israeli policy and Israeli leaders while raising nary a hint of criticism against Arab states and Arab leaders, the more that person is to be trusted, thanked and praised. From his perch in a presumably warmer climate, Henry Schwarzschild must be glowing.

Not An Anti-Semite, Just A Well-Intentioned Imbecile

Wednesday, December 27th, 2006

      I grew up during the 1970′s, universally acknowledged as a truly horrendous decade. In 1970′s America we danced to disco music, wore leisure suits, and watched “The Brady Bunch.” And as if that weren’t torture enough, we had Jimmy Carter as our president.
 
      I can still recall just how depressing it was to watch Carter’s taciturn face on TV announcing one catastrophe after another, from the skyrocketing misery index to Americans being taken hostage in Iran to the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan to the tragically botched attempt to rescue our countrymen from their Iranian captors.
 
      It would not be a stretch to say that Jimmy Carter was arguably the most hapless president in all American history, and indeed most presidential historians rate him at or near the very bottom of the list. Now, with the publication of his ignorant rant against Israel, Palestine Peace not Apartheid, many in the American Jewish community have come to believe that Carter is not simply a loser but an anti-Semite. I disagree. Jimmy Carter is not so much anti-Semite as anti-intellectual, not so much a Jew-hater as a boor.
 
      The real explanation behind Carter’s limitless hostility to Israel is a total lack of any moral understanding. Carter wants to do what’s just. His heart is in the right place – he just can’t figure out what the right is. He is, and always has been, a well-meaning imbecile, a well-intentioned fool, a man of good intentions bereft of good judgment. He invariably finds himself defending tyrants and dictators at the expense of their oppressed peoples. Not because he is a bad man, but because he is a confused man.
 
      Carter subscribes to what I call the “Always Root for the Underdog” school of morality. Israel has tanks and F-16′s, the Palestinians don’t. The Palestinians therefore are being oppressed. Never mind that the Palestinians have rejected every offer to live side by side with Israel in peace, and have just elected a government pledged to Israel’s annihilation. Their poverty dictates the righteousness of their cause even if their actions speak otherwise. If Israel builds a barrier to cordon off the Palestinians, it is not to prevent their suicide bombers from dismembering children but to punish them for having darker skin.
 
      Carter’s obsession with the unrighteous underdog has embarrassed him many times before. It was what motivated him to visit and legitimize Fidel Castro and take his side in a bio-weapons dispute with the United States. Castro runs a tiny island in the shadow of the world’s Superpower. He therefore must be a victim of American bullying, even if he is a brutal dictator and tyrant.
 
      Championing the unrighteous underdog also led Carter to praise the murderous North Korean tyrant Kim Il Sung with these words: “I find him to be vigorous, intelligent and in charge of the decisions about this country,” adding, “I don’t see that they [the North Koreans] are an outlaw nation.”
 
      He also hailed Marshal Joseph Tito as “a man who believes in human rights,” and said of the murderous Romanian dictator Ceausescu, “Our goals are the same: to have a just system of economics and politics. We believe in enhancing human rights.” Championing the underdog also led Carter to tell the Haitian dictator Raul C?dras that he was “ashamed of what my country has done to your country.”
 
      As a marital counselor I have met many well-meaning arbitrators who always take the side of the wife in an ugly dispute in the belief that the woman, because she is weaker than her husband, is always the innocent and aggrieved party. Even where the evidence pointed to the wife being violent and unreasonable, the arbitrator could not conceive of the husband as anything but an oppressor. Needless to say, such arbitrators cause more harm than good, which is why Jimmy Carter would make an even worse marital counselor than he was a president.
 
      No, Jimmy Carter is not an anti-Semite so much as a man whose shallowness and lack of judgment render him absolutely incapable of telling right from wrong.
 
      Carter’s obscene comparison of Israel with apartheid South Africa ignores the fact that Israel airlifted tens of thousands of black Africans ad made them free and full citizens of the Jewish state, a phenomenon that has no historical precedent.
 
      By saying the Palestinians are being subjected to apartheid Carter has grossly maligned not Jews but black South Africans. Whereas black South Africans inspired the world with their humane capacity for forgiveness and peaceful coexistence with their white brethren, even after having been so egregiously wronged, the Palestinians have unfortunately embraced murderous hatred and racism. Arab newspapers are filled with grotesque caricatures of Jews, and the Palestinians teach kindergarten children to grow up and blow up Israeli buses.
 
      Nelson Mandela rose to become a great statesman with his articulation of brotherhood and reconciliation. But Yasir Arafat fathered international terrorism and stole hundreds of millions of dollars from his own people who continue to live in abject poverty.
 

      All of which leads to one conclusion in the matter of James Earl Carter. Before one runs around the world as a global do-gooder, one should first develop the ability to identify the good.

     

      Rabbi Shmuley Boteach is a TV host (“Shalom in the Home”) whose most recent book is “Parenting with Fire: Lighting Up the Family with Passion and Inspiration.” His website is www.shmuley.com.

Jimmy Carter’s Jewish Problem

Wednesday, November 22nd, 2006

For those with eyes to see, there were hints as far back as the 1976 presidential campaign of the trouble to come. Early that year, Harper’s magazine published “Jimmy Carter’s Pathetic Lies,” a devastating exposé of Carter’s record in Georgia by a then little-known journalist named Steven Brill.

Reg Murphy, who as editor of the Atlanta Constitution had kept a close eye on Carter’s rise in state politics, declared, “Jimmy Carter is one of the three or four phoniest men I ever met.”

Speechwriter Bob Shrum quit the Carter campaign after just a few weeks, disgusted with what he described as Carter’s penchant for fudging the truth. He also related that Carter, convinced the Jewish vote in the Democratic primaries would go to Senator Henry (“Scoop”) Jackson, had instructed his staff not to issue any more statements on the Middle East.

“Jackson has all the Jews anyway,” Shrum quoted Carter as saying. “We get the Christians.”

Relations between Carter and Israel were tense from the outset of the Carter presidency. Carter’s hostility was evident to Israeli foreign minister Moshe Dayan, who in his memoir Breakthrough described a July 1977 White House meeting between Carter and Israeli officials. “You are more stubborn than the Arabs, and you put obstacles on the path to peace,’’ an angry Carter scolded Dayan and his colleagues.

“Our talk,” Dayan wrote, “lasted more than an hour and was most unpleasant. President Carter … launched charge after charge against Israel.”

On October 1, 1977, the U.S. and the Soviet Union unexpectedly issued a joint statement on the Middle East calling for an Arab-Israeli peace conference in Geneva, with the participation of Palestinian representatives. The communiqué marked the first time the U.S. officially employed the phrase “legitimate rights of the Palestinian people.”

Reaction in the U.S. was immediate and furious. “[A] political firestorm erupted,” wrote historian Steven Spiegel. “After American officials had worked successfully for years to reduce Russian influence over the Mideast peace process and in the area as whole, critics could not understand why the administration had suddenly invited Moscow to return.”

Egyptian President Anwar Sadat, who five years earlier had expelled thousands of Soviet military advisers from Egypt, neither liked nor trusted the Russians, and decided to kill the U.S.-Soviet initiative in the womb. His decision to go to Jerusalem to address the Knesset electrified the world and caught the Carter administration completely off guard.

Eventually the U.S. would broker what became known as the Camp David Accords and oversee the signing of the 1979 Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty. But Carter was far from a dispassionate third party. His disdain for Israeli prime minister Menachem Begin and near hero-worship of Sadat were clearly reflected in his demeanor and has informed nearly everything he’s written on the Middle East since leaving office.

In The Unfinished Presidency, his book about Carter’s post-White House activities, the liberal historian Douglas Brinkley provides a detailed account of the former president’s obsession with helping Palestinian terror chief Yasir Arafat polish his image. Carter, according to Brinkley, regularly advised Arafat on how to shape his message for Western journalists and even wrote some speeches for him.

Carter was also a vocal critic of Israeli policies and “view[ed] the unarmed young Palestinians who stood up against thousands of Israel soldiers as ‘instant heroes,’ ” wrote Brinkley. “Buoyed by the intifada, Carter passed on to the Palestinians, through Arafat, his congratulations.”

Former New York mayor Ed Koch, in his 1984 bestseller Mayor, recounted a conversation he had shortly before the 1980 election with Cyrus Vance, who’d recently resigned as Carter’s secretary of state. Koch told Vance that many Jews would not be voting for Cater because they feared “that if he is reelected he will sell them out.”

“Vance,” recalled Koch, “nodded and said, ‘He will.’ ”

In Dangerous Liaison: The Inside Story of the U.S.-Israeli Covert Relationship, Andrew and Leslie Cockburn revealed that during a March 1980 meeting with his senior political advisers, Carter, discussing his fading reelection prospects and his sinking approval rating in the Jewish community, snapped, “If I get back in, I’m going to [expletive] the Jews.”

Carter – such was the country’s good fortune – did not get back in. But as evidenced by his years of pro-Palestinian advocacy, reams of anti-Israel op-ed articles, and the release last week of his latest book/screed, Palestine Peace Not Apartheid, he’s been trying to [expletive] the Jews ever since.

Jimmy Carter Slams President Bush And Israel In Geneva Speech

Thursday, January 1st, 2004

Former president Jimmy Carter spoke sharply against the Bush administration and the Israeli government in his speech at the Geneva Accord ceremony on Monday.
 
Carter castigated President Bush for what he described as widespread anti-American sentiment and blamed Bush for the surge in worldwide terrorism.

“The present administration in Washington,” said Carter, “has been invariably supportive of Israel, and the well-being of the Palestinian people has been ignored or relegated to secondary importance.”

He added: “There is no doubt that the lack of real effort to resolve the Palestinian issue is a primary source of anti-American sentiment throughout the Middle East and a major incentive for terrorist activity.”

Carter, a constant critic of Israeli policies both during his presidency and in the 23 years since he left office, described the security fence being built by Israel and Jewish settlements in Judea, Samaria and the Gaza Strip as the main obstacles to peace and called for the return of Palestinian refugees to the territories – something not even stipulated in the Geneva Accord.

The former president placed the onus for arriving at a peace settlement squarely on Israel, saying, “No matter what leaders Palestinians might choose, no matter how fervent American interests might be, or how great the hatred and bloodshed might become, there is one basic choice for the Israelis: Do you want peace with your neighbors or do you want to retain settlements throughout the occupied territories?”

Although Carter said that Palestinians must forgo violence, he insisted it be as part of an exchange for Israel’s commitment to the Geneva Accord.

The launch of the Geneva Accord conference took place Monday night in a glitzy ceremony emceed by Jewish film actor Richard Dreyfuss.

It wasn’t long before the ceremony became what some observers described as a festival of Israel-bashing, with Palestinian and Israeli speakers criticizing the government of Israel.

In addition to Carter, speakers included Nobel laureates Lech Walesa of Poland and John Hume of Northern Ireland. A letter from British Prime Minister Tony Blair was read by Lord Michael Levy, and other messages of support were sent by French President Jacques Chirac, former Czech president Vaclav Havel and former U.S. president Bill Clinton.

Although there was no official signing of any agreement, two of the driving forces behind the accord, former Israeli justice minister Yossi Beilin and former PA information minister Yasir Abed Rabbo, joined hands in a gesture that caused a standing ovation.

The Israeli delegation to Geneva was led by Beilin, Labor MK Amram Mitzna, and ex-ministers Amnon Lipkin-Shahak and Yuli Tamir.

A conference is scheduled next month in Egypt where the accord’s architects plan to meet with various Arab leaders. In the meantime, a door-to-door campaign is planned in Palestinian and Israeli neighborhoods to drive up public support for the plan.

On Tuesday some Israeli officials voiced criticism of Secretary of State Colin Powell’s decision to meet with Beilin and Abed Rabbo in order to receive an update on the details of the plan.

Israeli leaders on both the Left and the Right have declared their staunch opposition to the accord.

“This Geneva farce will not bring peace,” said Justice Minister Yosef Lapid. “It will only push peace further away.”

Sharon’s media adviser Raanan Gissin called the Geneva document ‘a Swiss golden calf’ for the Israeli Left, and said it was tantamount to Israel committing suicide.

The sharpest attack against the Geneva ceremony came from former Labor prime minister Ehud Barak, who said that “after three years of one of the bloodiest suicide-bombing campaigns in the history of terror led by Arafat and Hamas spiritual leader Sheikh Ahmed] Yassin, this accord is rewarding terror. It will not save lives, it will lead to more deaths.”

“The issue of right of return into Israel is not solved; it gives Israel a measure of control over the rate of that return, but it doesn’t solve the problem - it complicates it,” he said. “Contrary to what Jimmy Carter said, there is no recognition of Israel as a Jewish state. Not even this simplest demand is met.”

Following are the main points of the accords:

- The agreement constitutes an end to all claims on both sides. The border it sets is final, unappealable and replaces all UN resolutions and previous agreements.

- The Palestinians recognize the Jewish people’s right to a state, and each side recognizes Israel and Palestine as the other’s national homeland. The Palestinian state will inherit all of the PLO’s rights and responsibilities.

- Jerusalem: All Jewish neighborhoods, including those in East Jerusalem, will remain under Israeli sovereignty, and the Palestinians will recognize Jerusalem, in its new borders, as Israel’s capital. Palestinian neighborhoods will be under Palestinian sovereignty and will become the Palestinian state’s capital. Palestinian residents of East Jerusalem will lose their Israeli residency rights and become Palestinian citizens.

- The Temple Mount will be under Palestinian sovereignty, but an international force will maintain order and ensure freedom of access for all faiths. Jewish prayer on the mount will be forbidden, as will archaeological digs.

- The Western Wall and the Jewish Quarter, including Zion Gate and Dung Gate, will remain under Israeli sovereignty.

- Refugees: The words ‘return’ or ‘right of return’ do not appear in the document. Israel will accept a limited number of Palestinian refugees, with this number at its own discretion (experts estimate around 40,000 refugees over a period of several years). The other refugees may resettle in Palestine or third countries. Israel will pay an agreed sum in compensation to the refugees.

- Borders: Israel will withdraw to the 1967 borders within 30 months, except for agreed territorial exchanges in a 1:1 ratio. The Israel Defense Forces will maintain a presence in the Jordan Valley for an additional three years.

- Territorial exchanges: Israel will annex a strip of the West Bank near Ben-Gurion Airport and major settlement blocs near the Green Line, including the settlements around Jerusalem: Ma’aleh Adumim, Givat Ze’ev, Gush Etzion and Givon. In exchange, Israel will give the Palestinians equivalent territory in the Negev, adjacent to the Gaza Strip. Efrat, Har Homa and Ariel will become Palestinian.

With reporting by Jewish Press Israel correspondent Avraham Shmuel Lewin and the Jerusalem Post.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/news-magazine/jimmy-carter-slams-president-bush-and-israel-in-geneva-speech/2004/01/01/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: