web analytics
October 21, 2014 / 27 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘star’

Chassidic Chanukah Festival Returns For 31st Year

Wednesday, November 17th, 2010

The 31st Annual South Florida Chassidic Chanukah Festival is getting bigger and better. Over 10,000 people have participated each year since the event was moved to Gulfstream Park in Hallandale Beach in 2007. The upcoming festival planned for Wednesday, December 8, has a star-studded program that will likely see the largest attendance ever.

 

World-renowned child prodigy Ethan Bortnick will once again grace the stage of the world’s largest Chanukah festival. Ethan has a stage presence that is nothing short of remarkable.

 

Jewish music superstar Benny Friedman will be also part of the concert celebration.  Benny’s bestselling debut album “Taamu” was released in 2009, and his rising popularity has made him very high in demand.

 

The festival will also feature twin chassidic acrobats from France. Their dazzling performance will provide an unforgettable viewing experience.

 

 

Twin chassidic acrobats from France

slated to perform at Chanukah Festival

 

 

The festival is held at Hallandale Beach, Gulfstream Park, US1 and Hallandale Beach Blvd. The event is annually produced and directed by Chabad of South Broward, leaders in Jewish Education, social services and community outreach.

 

The festival will be preceded by a 100-car menorah parade, starting out from the Yeshiva Gedolah of Greater Miami, under the patronage of Florida Friends of Lubavitch.

 

Other festival highlights include the lighting of Florida’s Largest menorah, led by Cantor Rabbi Yossy Lebovics and a large lineup of community leaders, free Chanukah gelt and goodies for the thousands of children in attendance, a delicious dinner (for a nominal fee), and scores of valuable prizes.

 

Rabbi Levi Tennenhaus, the event coordinator and Chabad’s program director, encourages those who can afford it to get reserved seating: “The event, as always, is free. However, in addition to our major sponsors, individuals are entitled to reserve VIP seats for $100 per seat. This will help both the festival, which runs at an enormous cost as a service to the community, and individuals who want the luxury and convenience to sit up front with their seats reserved exclusively for them and their families.”

 

For more festival information, and to reserve VIP and box seats, please call 954-458-1877, e-mail Itchabad@gmail.com, or log on to chabadsouthbroward.com.

By The Numbers

Wednesday, May 12th, 2010

While we’re counting the Omer we’ll also be counting Alex Rodriguez’s homers. When the Yankees third baseman hits his 17th home run this season, it will be the 600th of his career. A-Rod, who’ll be 35 in July, is a good bet to hit 800 career home runs – a number never yet reached by anyone – before he retires.

 

Albert Pujols was 34 homers shy of reaching number 400 when the season started. The Cardinals first baseman is 30 and may top A-Rod’s career homers before he’s through.

 

In the pitching department, Milwaukee reliever Trevor Hoffman, 42, started the season nine saves shy of 600. That’s a mark that may never be reached by any other pitcher. Mariano Rivera, for example, started 2010 at 526 career saves. The Yankees closer is 40 and has a good shot at 600 saves but Hoffman is still adding to the numbers that could cement his spot as baseball’s all-time saves leader.

 

Speaking of aging pitchers and consistency, Phillies lefthander Jamie Moyer is the big story. He’s 47 years old. That’s right, 47. Moyer is in his 24th big league season; his numbers are 258-195 with a 4.22 ERA. Certainly not Hall of Fame caliber, but good enough to have kept Moyer in the majors for two and a half decades.

 

How good will Roy Halladay be with the Phillies? While with Toronto in the American League he faced the Yankees, Red Sox, Tampa Bay and several other solid hitting teams. With the Phils in the National League, Halladay will face weaker hitting as the NL doesn’t have the designated hitter rule and the pitcher bats for himself (unless, of course, the manager inserts a pinch hitter resulting in that pitcher’s removal from the game).

 

The fact that the National and American leagues operate with different rules is ridiculous, but that’s for another column. Aging hitters add on a couple of years to their career as designated hitters, but I like the strategy and the additional decisions managers have to make in the NL.

 

Speaking of hitters, can Ryan Braun (.320, 32 homers, 114 RBI last year) and Prince Fielder (.299, 46, 141) equal or better their numbers this year? Can Mark Reynolds do it again? He’s the biggest star most people don’t know about. The third baseman of the Arizona Diamondbacks was the only big-league player last year to top 40 homers (44), 100 RBI (102), and 20 stolen bases (24).

 

While Houston is expected to finish close to the bottom of the NL Central, I’ll be following the Astros’ interesting outfield. Center fielder Michael Bourn led the league with 61 stolen bases while batting .285 in ’09, and the defensive whiz won a Gold Glove.

 

Braun hit only three home runs but power comes from the outfield corners. Right fielder Hunter Pence hit 25 home runs while batting .282 last year and veteran left fielder Carlos Lee had his usual steady year (.300, 26,102). In his three years with the Astros, Lee has slugged 86 homers and knocked in 321 runs while batting .305.

 

Derek Jeter has hit over .300 for five consecutive seasons and carried a .317 lifetime average when the season – his 16th with the Yankees – began. In all probability, he’ll reach 3,000 career hits next season. Jorge Posada will be 39 in August, pretty old for a catcher. Posada put up good numbers last year in only 313 at bats (.285, 22, 81). While it would be difficult for a team to come up with a catcher to match Posada, the Yanks have some good catching prospects you’ll be hearing about in Jesus Montero and Austin Romine.

 

While Jeter is in a class by himself, Troy Tulowitzki should outdo him over the next 10 years. Only 25, the all-star shortstop of the Colorado Rockies is superb in all departments. The defensive whiz batted .297, blasted 32 homers and swiped 20 bases last year. Another member of the Rockies who performs under the radar is Todd Helton. The left-handed batting 36-year-old first baseman hit .325 in ’09, has a .328 career average and will continue adding to his 2,000-plus hits and 300-plus homers as he quietly puts together a Hall of Fame career.

 

Atlanta Braves outfielder Jason Heyward has been billed as a combination Hank Aaron, Willie Mays and Barry Bonds. Heyward hits for average and power and it will be interesting to follow the rookie who turns 21 in August. Veteran Chipper Jones hit only 18 home runs for the Braves last season. It was the first time Jones, 38, dipped under 20 in a season and his .264 average was 43 points under his career mark.

 

Matt Holliday was hitting .286 for Oakland last July 24 when he was traded to St. Louis and went on to bat .353 in 63 games for the Cardinals. While Holliday and Pujols put up big numbers, Cardinals second baseman Skip Schumaker is becoming quite a player. The 25-year-old left-handed batter topped .300 the past two seasons. Another player still under the radar is Brandon Phillips of the Reds. Last season he batted a steady .276 for Cincinnati with 30 doubles, 20 homers, 98 RBI and 25 stolen bases.

 

While we know that 27-year-old Twins catcher Joe Mauer is ticketed for the Hall of Fame, Orioles catcher Matt Wieters is quickly establishing himself. Wieters hit .303 in 39 games for Triple-A Norfolk last year before being promoted and batting .288 for Baltimore in 96 games. He started slow with the Orioles but got better as the season wore on, hitting .350 in his final 27 games in ’09.

 

George Will, the all-around maven on everything from politics to baseball and a long-suffering Cubs fan, joked on a Detroit radio station that “the Cubs are three Cardinals injuries away from winning the division. Of course, the injuries have to be to the Cardinals’ top two pitchers and Albert Pujols.”

 

Will, while of course not hoping for any Cardinals injuries, would love to see the Cubs win a World Series in his lifetime. The last time the Cubbies did so was 102 years ago, in 1908, when they beat the Tigers of Ty Cobb.

 

The Cubs have a new owner this year and when manager Lou Piniella is replaced down the road, look for former Cubs star Ryne Sandberg to take over. The former second baseman knows the young talent in the system; he managed in Double-A last year and is skippering the Triple-A Iowa Cubs this season.

 

 

Irwin Cohen, the author of seven books, headed a national baseball publication for five years before earning a World Series ring as a department head in a major league front office. Cohen, whose column appears the second week of each month, is president of the Detroit area’s Agudah shul and may be reached in his dugout at irdav@sbcglobal.net.

Crossword Puzzle – “The Hills” Of Jerusalem

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2010

Across

1. MC

5. Head cover?

9. Sci-fi weapon

14. Type of enemy

15. Arm bone

16. Young Israel teen tours name

17. Bog

18. Baseball’s oldest team

19. Like high prices

20. Jerusalem campus locale

23. Lord of the Rings creature

24. ___ all good

25. Parts of bookstores

30. Taylor

32. A Gershwin

34. Lechem mishnah option

35. Fuel

37. Bite sized Twizzler

38. Israel Defense Forces, e.g.

39. Where many gedolim are buried

43. Novelist Mirvis

44. Sinai emotion

45. Tokyo, once

46. Bracha follower

47. One ___ customer

48. Small piece of land surrounded by water

52. Where to find 20, 39, and 57-Across

54. For

56. Santa ___

57. Holiest of places

61. Really dislike

65. Final page in a calendar

66. Redwood or Lemon

67. Bother

68. Half

69. Rip

70. ___ airplane

71. Have (archaic)

72. Former mobile

 

Down

1. Tool belt item

2. Ripken or Tejada

3. 9 days feature

4. Not now

5. Pitcher against the Mets in the 1986 World Series

6. Baldwin and Guinness

7. ___-China

8. Grating voice

9. Cowboy item

10. Perform

11. That girl

12. Seth’s mom

13. Sing like Matisyahu, at times

21. Pagan figure

22. Can’t

26. Cheers

27. Traditional knowledge

28. Shade trees

29. Clever

31. Spiny lizard

32. Surmise

33. Future Olympics locale

36. Yeah, they’ve got that (singular)

39. Ewes and mares, often

40. Done

41. Be in debt

42. Expression

43. ___ chi

49. Babes in Toyland co-star

50. Group of Egyptian pagan figures

51. Potatoes

53. Type of gas

54. Purple and/or red fruits

55. Set fire again

58. Common shorts material

59. Something copped

60. Von Bismarck with a palindrome

61. Place where Richard Kimble spent some time, with “the”

62. Yoko of note

63. Also

64. Piggy

 

(Answers, next week)

Yoni can be reached at yglatt@youngisrael.org

Crossword Puzzle – “The Hills” of Jerusalem

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2010

Across

1. MC

5. Head cover?

9. Sci-fi weapon

14. Type of enemy

15. Arm bone

16. Young Israel teen tours name

17. Bog

18. Baseball’s oldest team

19. Like high prices

20. Jerusalem campus locale

23. Lord of the Rings creature

24. ___ all good

25. Parts of bookstores

30. Taylor

32. A Gershwin

34. Lechem mishnah option

35. Fuel

37. Bite sized Twizzler

38. Israel Defense Forces, e.g.

39. Where many gedolim are buried

43. Novelist Mirvis

44. Sinai emotion

45. Tokyo, once

46. Bracha follower

47. One ___ customer

48. Small piece of land surrounded by water

52. Where to find 20, 39, and 57-Across

54. For

56. Santa ___

57. Holiest of places

61. Really dislike

65. Final page in a calendar

66. Redwood or Lemon

67. Bother

68. Half

69. Rip

70. ___ airplane

71. Have (archaic)

72. Former mobile

 

Down

1. Tool belt item

2. Ripken or Tejada

3. 9 days feature

4. Not now

5. Pitcher against the Mets in the 1986 World Series

6. Baldwin and Guinness

7. ___-China

8. Grating voice

9. Cowboy item

10. Perform

11. That girl

12. Seth’s mom

13. Sing like Matisyahu, at times

21. Pagan figure

22. Can’t

26. Cheers

27. Traditional knowledge

28. Shade trees

29. Clever

31. Spiny lizard

32. Surmise

33. Future Olympics locale

36. Yeah, they’ve got that (singular)

39. Ewes and mares, often

40. Done

41. Be in debt

42. Expression

43. ___ chi

49. Babes in Toyland co-star

50. Group of Egyptian pagan figures

51. Potatoes

53. Type of gas

54. Purple and/or red fruits

55. Set fire again

58. Common shorts material

59. Something copped

60. Von Bismarck with a palindrome

61. Place where Richard Kimble spent some time, with “the”

62. Yoko of note

63. Also

64. Piggy

 

(Answers, next week)

Yoni can be reached at yglatt@youngisrael.org

Play Ball!

Wednesday, April 9th, 2008

      The 2008 baseball season is finally here. These are my predictions:

 

National League East


 


      Led by Johan Santana and a diminished version of Pedro Martinez – both in terms of innings pitched and talent – the Mets still have the arms to top the division. Atlanta, though, has old hands Tom Glavine and John Smoltz and an improved bullpen. Third baseman Chipper Jones and first baseman Mark Teixeira anchor a lineup that’s better than that of the Mets, who’ll need a good year from first baseman Carlos Delgado to stave off the Braves.

 

      Philadelphia has the most balanced lineup in the league but can’t match the starting pitching of the Mets and Braves. The Phillies did bolster their bullpen with the addition of Brad Lidge (acquired from the Astros). Washington has the division’s best stadium in new Nationals Park, and underrated manager Manny Acta will get his players to land above the Florida Marlins.

 

      Marlins fans are suffering through yet another dismantling of their team and can only wonder when baseball’s best offensive shortstop will be traded. Compare Marlins shortstop Hanley Ramirez’s 2007 numbers to Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter. Amazingly, both had 639 at-bats, but Ramirez outpunched Jeter -.332 average (Jeter, .322); 29 home runs (Jeter, 12); 89 RBIs, (Jeter, 73) and 51 stolen bases (Jeter, 15). So pencil in the Marlins for last and even though they’ll be last in attendance, they may be first in profits as the team collectively earns less than A-Rod.

 

National League Central

 

      The Cubs topped this division last year with only 85 victories and have enough punch to do it again. Their pitching is only adequate but no worse than that of other clubs in the Central. Milwaukee lost free agent closer Francisco Cordero to a better offer from the Reds and signed has-been closer Eric Gagne for the role. The Brewers’ young hitters will score runs but a leaky bullpen will give up a lot as well.

 

      Cincinnati should be the dominant team in the division by next year as top-notch prospects gain experience. Houston has a good young outfielder in Hunter Pence but not much more to brag about and will have a hard time bettering last year’s 73-89 record.


      St. Louis won’t match last year’s 78-84 record, and even if Albert Pujols stays healthy, the Cards may shuffle to the bottom. Pittsburgh has a great ballpark but the league’s worst team. 2008 will be the 16th consecutive season the Pirates will finish under .500 (tying a major league record).

 

National League West

 

      Arizona has strong starting pitching and good enough hitting to finish on top. Colorado has Matt Holliday and a better lineup but can’t top the pitching of the Diamondbacks. Los Angeles has a mixture of veterans and good young players, so new manager Joe Torre has the tools to compete.

 

      San Diego has better pitching than the Rockies and Dodgers, but not enough hitting. San Francisco has the worst lineup in the league and at times the defense makes it look like Harpo and Groucho are in the field. Without Barry Bonds, the Giants won’t even match last year’s dismal 71-91 record.

 

American League East

 

      The Yankees are a more talented and settled team this year. A-Rod is signed and the young pitchers proved they can win often in the big leagues. Second baseman Robinson Cano got better as last season wore on, hitting .343 with 57 RBIs after the all-star break.


      Boston is blessed with good starting pitching, great relievers, and strong hitting. Even though boppers David “Big Papi” Ortiz and Manny Ramirez combined to hit 391 home runs over the past five years with the Red Sox and there are a couple of other pesky hitters in the lineup, I’m going with the Yanks to top the division.

 

      Toronto is a good team that should be better this year. Adding veteran infielders David Eckstein and Scott Rolen improves the offense and Roy Halladay tops a pitching rotation that could beat the Yanks and Red Sox more often this season. Outfielder Vernon Wells had a bad shoulder last year (.245, 16 homers), and his numbers should be much higher this year. Look for a three-team race for the top spot.

 

      Tampa Bay might just be good enough to beat out most National League teams for the top spot. The Rays have several players tagged for stardom and should be even better next season. Baltimore needs to get better at several positions before it can compete in this tough division.

 

American League Central

 

      Detroit started the season missing leadoff man Curtis Granderson, who often started games with a double or triple. When their star center fielder returns from a hand injury and gets his timing back, the Tigers will be back to winning more often. Even though closer Todd Jones is not as dominant as others in the division, the Tigers will get better as the season wears on and their two top set up men, relievers Fernando Rodney and Joel Zumaya come off the disabled list.

 

      Cleveland is a tough, experienced team and would dominate any division in the National League. But a talking fish from Monsey tells me the Tribe will finish behind Detroit, and Boston will take the A.L. wild card spot. It will be a tough off-season for Indians fans if free agent pitcher C. C. Sabathia signs elsewhere, and especially hard to take if Detroit lands him. (The Tigers are swimming in cash after selling 2.6 million tickets before the season even began.)

 

      The White Sox upgraded their offense with shortstop Orlando Cabrera (.301 last year with the Angels) and outfielder Nick Swisher (22 homers for Oakland), but Chicago’s pitching isn’t as strong as Cleveland’s or quite as good as Detroit’s.

 

      Minnesota will try to compete without Johan Santana and Torii Hunter. Twins fans showed they were behind their newcomers by trekking through seven inches of snow to fill the Metrodome with its largest opening day crowd in 15 years. The Twins always seem to come up with nobodies who end up becoming somebodies.

 

      The Kansas City Royals outplayed the Tigers in the season’s opening series, proving they aren’t pushovers and can beat any club at any time.

 

American League West

 

      Seattle has five good starters and some solid finishers. Even though the lineup led by Ichiro Suzuki isn’t as good as the Angels’, the Mariners have enough to land on top. Los Angeles won six more games than Seattle last year, and the Angels have added Torii Hunter’s bat and glove. On paper, this is the best club in the division but games aren’t played on paper. On the field, I’m going with the Mariners.

 

      Texas has some good prospects but they’re mostly in the low minors and if they ever make an impact, it won’t be for several seasons. Oakland has some good pitching prospects who may make an impact as early as late this season. The Athletics are clearly a club on the rise; look for the rich clubs (Yankees, Mets, Tigers, Red Sox), to make a pitch for some of the A’s pitchers as the season wears on.

 

*     *     *

 

      So, I’m picking the Mets, Cubs and Diamondbacks to top their divisions in the National League and the Yankees, Tigers and Mariners in the American League.

 

      My wild card picks are the Braves in the National League and the Red Sox in the American League.

 

      The last time the Cubs won a World Series was one hundred years ago, in 1908; the last time the Cubs participated in a World Series was in 1945. Both times they played Detroit.


      Will it be the Cubs and Tigers in this year’s Fall Classic? Will the two New York teams play each other? Will only one New York team make it? If so, which one?

 

      I’ll give you my World Series choices and winner next month.

 

      Which teams are you picking?


 


      Irwin Cohen, the author of seven books, headed a national baseball publication for five years before earning a World Series ring working as a department head in a major league front office. His “Baseball Insider” column appears the second week of each month in The Jewish Press. Cohen, who is president of the Detroit area’s Agudah shul, may be reached in his dugout at irdav@sbcglobal.net.   

Fantastically Real Kabbalah Paintings

Wednesday, February 27th, 2008

Artexpo New York

February 28-March 3, 2008


Javits Convention Center, New York



 


Some artists’ iconoclastic, bohemian behavior gets them into trouble. But David Gafni’s 1972 run-in with the law was more of a freak accident than an indication of his self-destruction, and it gave him a religious epiphany.

 

While he was involved in designing Israel’s Yad Vashem museum, Gafni, 66, was driving to Jerusalem when a bee flew into his car and so distracted him that he swerved and collided with a police car. A father of three young children, Gafni was badly injured and vowed to pray every day if he recovered. “I have done so since then,” he said.

 

Gafni’s work is currently on display at Artexpo New York. A graduate of the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design, Gafni was chief designer of the Western Wall Tunnels for 16 years and worked at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. He has designed a museum and several exhibitions for Chabad(which were personally approved by the Lubavitcher Rebbe), and he has created exhibits for Orthodox communities in Jerusalem.

 

In the course of his studies, Gafni became attracted to the Vienna School of Fantastic Realism, which was founded in the ’40s as an offshoot of Surrealism and Art Nouveau and combined techniques of the Old Masters with religious and mystical iconography. The movement inspired Gafni with its “optimistic view of imagination and fantastic reality,” and “rich, happy colors and realistic execution.”

 

Gafni infused his abstract work with Jewish content, and he was influenced by Mordechai Ardon, then-director of Bezalel who used Kabbalistic motifs, and Shmuel Beck, whose work centered on the Holocaust. For his final project in calligraphy at Bezalel – which required designing a hand-written and painted book – Gafni created a prayer book based upon ancient Jewish art. He drew the typography from the Dead Sea Scrolls, and incorporated ancient Kabbalistic paintings, including one with a seven branch Menorah whose pedestal was made of the feet of the lion, eagle, bull, and man from Ezekiel’s vision.

 

 



David Gafni. “The Throne of God and the Creatures of the Chariot – Merkabah”


 

 

The animals from Ezekiel’s vision surface in Gafni’s “The Throne of God and the Creatures of the Chariot – Merkaba”, which shows the three animals and the man near the heavenly throne in the seventh palace of Paradise. The four, who are essentially disembodied heads attached to the cloud formations, contemplate a menorah with orange, green, blue, and purple branches. Gafni plants two mountains in the foreground, so the viewer only experiences the vision from a distance.

 

“Jerusalem at the End of Days: Gog and Magog” is the first of five omens, “which shall be revealed to all, to usher in the revelation of the ‘King Messiah,’” according to Gafni’s website. The landscape depicts Jerusalem’s Old City in black and gray, but the city rests on an unstable foundation that resembles tree roots. The Tower of David has twisted almost beyond recognition into a configuration that resembles a corkscrew, as a blue, red, and white form, which evokes the Caduceus (the ancient astronomical sign of a staff with two intertwined snakes, which is used as a symbol of medicine) hovers above the city. An accompanying text on Gafni’s website cites Zecharia 14:8 and interprets it: “The Mount of Olives is cleft in two, and water gushes forth from the depths of earth, forming two streams, one flowing towards the ‘Primeval sea,’ i.e. the Dead Sea, and one towards the ‘Last Sea,’ i.e. the Mediterranean.”

 

 



David Gafni. “Jerusalem at the End of Days: Gog and Magog.” All images courtesy of the artist.


 

 

In “The Crimson Star and Flame of Fire,” the fourth of the Messianic signs, Jerusalem is again comfortably resting on solid foundation, but the sky is ablaze and a large meteor-like object seems poised to smash the buildings. The painting’s reliance on a palette of mostly primary colors heightens the piece’s dreamy look. Gafni’s website identifies the reference as the Zohar‘s commentary on Balak 22, “And then a terrible crimson star shall arise in the firmament and shall burn and glow throughout the day for all the world to behold.” Gafni adds that the star faces a flame of fire for 40 days, when the two wage war upon each other. “In the end, the star engulfs the flame. The star remains in the sky, where it drifts about for 12 days,” Gafni writes on his site.

 

 



David Gafni. “The Crimson Star and Flame of Fire”


 

 

A star waging a battle against a flame and a sea gushing forth as mountains are split in half might sound a bit unusual, but Kabbalistic and apocalyptic symbols have figured in many artists’ works, perhaps most significantly that of painter and poet, William Blake. In his very detailed etchings of Biblical and mystical scenes, Blake depicted angels and demons often with human faces, which serves to make Kabbalah more accessible and recognizable. Where previous artists depicted demons as black creatures with horns and cloven hooves, Blake chose to represent his demons as men, often even wingless.

 

Gafni’s works, in their quotations of Surrealism, address Kabbalah from more of a humble distance. By positioning his Kabbalistic scenes in landscapes that are fantastical, Gafni presents narratives that are gripping and lifelike, but also dreamy and unnatural. If Blake causes the viewer to fear she or he will wake up to an apocalypse tomorrow, Gafni’s apocalypse is a little further off in the future.

 

 



David Gafni. “The War of One Star Against the Seven Stars”


 

 

To be clear, not all of Gafni’s work is religious. He has designed many exhibits and exhibition spaces, including shows for the Israel Aircraft Industries, NASA, and a memorial exhibit for the Israeli Intelligence Community. But even as he has achieved distinction as a designer and painter, Gafni has always returned to the “basic art of the Jewish nation,” which expresses hope and “a vision for the reinstatement of the Jewish people and world peace.” Gafni sees his work as an heir to the Judaica tradition of painted synagogues, religious artifacts, and holy books. “I believe I continue to contribute my share to this industry in my way and with my openness towards any viewer, Jew and non-Jew alike,” he said.

 

For more information on David Gafni’s work, please visit his website at: http://www.davidgafni.com.

 

Menachem Wecker is a painter, writer and editor based in Washington, D.C. He welcomes comments at mwecker@gmail.com.  

Title: A Taste of Challah: A Complete Guide to Challah and Bread Baking

Wednesday, October 10th, 2007


Title: A Taste of Challah: A Complete Guide to Challah and Bread Baking

Author: Tamar Ansh
Publisher: Feldheim

 

         Bubby’s Bobka never knew that it would become an international star. Now it is, thanks to Tamar Ansh and Feldheim Publishers.

 

         The eye-catching cover of this easily held book compels you to open the pages and coo over the cleverly photographed processes of preparing each recipe inside. The framework of an authentic Jewish life is explained as the pages unfold, with explanations and blessings to guide you through baking day and all the days of your life. Treat the book with utmost respect as the Hebrew name of G‑d appears in it several times. You can also salute the author for including time-tested tips for setting up your workspace and creating perfect recipes.

 

         You want a No-Pocket Pita or a Yemenite Saluf with a roasted top, perfect for chilbeh and schug? No problem! The recipes for the spicy dips appear on the very next page. And if you need something milder for your tender tummy, see the Cinnabon Cinnamon Rolls instructions nearby. Eat your hearts out, bakery owners. This is one can-do cookbook for beginners and experienced kitchen mavens.

 

         Rabbis, rest assured that all will go well. Pages 190-199 teach the readers how to separate challah and explain the halachic ramifications of hafrashat challah.

 

         Olim from non-metric countries will surely treasure the metric and other conversion charts at the back of the book. Life in Israel is measured somewhat differently, as are recipes in the Holy Land.

 

         Add this essential ingredient to your kitchen today.A Taste of Challah: A Complete Guide to Challah and Bread Baking is a must-have item. Give it to your local bride-to-be and get one for her mother, too.

 

 


Yocheved Golani is the author of It’s MY Crisis! And I’ll Cry If I Need To: A Life Book for Helping You to Dry Your Tears and Cope With a Medical Challenge (Booklocker Publishing).

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/title-a-taste-of-challah-a-complete-guide-to-challah-and-bread-baking/2007/10/10/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: