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October 28, 2016 / 26 Tishri, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘stroke’

Former President Peres ‘Moving Both Hands,’ Slow Improvement Continues

Monday, September 19th, 2016

Doctors at Chaim Sheba Medical Center at Tel Hashomer near Tel Aviv say former President Shimon Peres is starting to get a little stronger.

The elder statesman showed more improvement in his condition late Sunday night and again on Monday.

Sources at the hospital said Israel’s ninth president was able to move both of his hands, and that he was able to respond to simple instructions from the doctors as well.

But Peres remains in serious, albeit stable condition seven days after having suffered a major cerebral hemorrhage.

Nevertheless, doctors said the fact that Peres can move both of his hands may mean it’s possible the 93-year-old former president may not have suffered damage to the left side of his brain.

Hana Levi Julian

Doctors to Reduce Sedation for Former Pres. Shimon Peres

Sunday, September 18th, 2016

Former President Shimon Peres remains in serious but stable condition, following the stroke he suffered last Tuesday, and his condition “is unchanged,” doctors said Sunday.

Another CT scan was carried out at the Chaim Sheba Medical Center along with an additional set of neurological examinations on Peres.

Following the tests, the medical team decided to gradually reduce the amount of respiratory support, and the level of sedation being given to Israel’s ninth president.

Peres appears aware and responsive at the times when he’s less sedated, according to his personal physician and son-in-law, Professor Rafi Walden, who is also the deputy director of the medical center.

Incumbent President Reuven Rivlin made a bikur holim visit to the hospital Saturday night after the end of the Sabbath to pay his respects and offer support to the family and to the medical staff treating his predecessor and colleague.

The medical team has said doctors will continue to evaluate and monitor the former president’s condition as treatment continues. His name for continued prayers is Shimon ben Sara.

Hana Levi Julian

Former President Shimon Peres Fights For Life After Massive Stroke

Wednesday, September 14th, 2016

Former President Shimon Peres was fighting for his life at Chaim Sheba Medical Center in Tel Hashomer Tuesday night, just an hour after he was felled by a severe stroke.

Peres was rushed to the hospital Tuesday evening after feeling “weak” and becoming confused. Dr. Ayelet Frisch, Peres communications consultant, said his personal physician, Prof. Rafi Walden, had him taken to Sheba Medical Center at Tel Hashomer, near Tel Aviv. Walden is the deputy director of Sheba Medical Center.

As of 02:00 am Israel time, the former president was breathing with the aid of a respirator, in an induced medical coma to ease the stress of his condition on his body. Doctors convened late Tuesday night to decide whether surgery would be helpful to the former president in any way; it was decided that surgery was not an option and the best thing was to simply keep their patient as comfortable as possible.

Upon his arrival at the hospital, Peres underwent an initial CT scan to determine his medical status, and then was sedated and placed on a respirator in the intensive care unit.

The initial CT showed the 93-year-old elder statesman had suffered a massive cerebral hemorrhage, with a second CT scan to assess his condition about an hour later having showed no improvement.

Hemi Peres, the son of the former president, asked the public to pray for his father (name for prayers: Shimon ben Sara) in a statement outside the medical center.

“These have not been easy hours for my family and I,” he said. “We have received many messages from people in Israel and abroad, and we have been wrapped up with warmth and love.

But “at some point,” he acknowledged painfully, decisions will have to be made.”

“Nothing is more precious to my father than the nation of Israel and its people,” he continued. “My father is a special person. I am remaining optimistic. I am praying and hoping for the best.”

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu sent his wishes for a speedy recovery. “Shimon we love you and the entire nation is praying you will recover,” Netanyahu said.

Both chief rabbis of Israel — Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi David Lau, and Sephardic Chief Rabbi Yitzhak Yosef — also sent their blessings and prayers for a swift recovery.

Incumbent President Reuven Rivlin expressed concern over his predecessor’s condition, and said, “I am following with concern the updates from the hospital, and praying together with the entire people for my friend Shimon’s recovery.”

Labor Party Chairman Isaac Herzog also extended wishes for a speedy recovery to Peres, his predecessor in the party. “I wish you, our former president and eternally beloved Shimon Peres, that you recover quickly and return to make your wise, clear and sober voice heard. A complete recovery!” Herzog wrote on the Twitter social network site.

The former president had undergone a procedure last week to implant a pacemaker after returning from a diplomatic conference in Italy. He was released from the hospital the following day.

But Peres experienced a number of medical episodes during the past year. He was hospitalized on January 14 for a heart condition and doctors performed angioplasty in order to unblock an artery. He was discharged from the hospital five days later, but was compelled to cancel a trip to the World Economic Forum in Davos the next day. Peres had planned 15 meetings with world leaders and officials for that trip, and doctors advised him to “rest,” instead.

A professional politician for more than six decades, Peres has held just about every top position in the government of Israel, including stints as prime minister, foreign minister, finance minister, defense minister, and president. Since completing his seven-year term in 2014 as president, he has hosted numerous public events at his Peres Peace Center in an attempt to create his own unique brand of peace and co-existence between Arabs and Jews.

Known throughout the world as an “ambassador for peace,” Peres was awarded the 1994 Nobel Peace Prize for his part in reaching the 1993 Oslo Accords together with then-Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Palestine Liberation Organization chairman Yasser Arafat – the agreement that created the Palestinian Authority.

Hana Levi Julian

Israeli President Sends Condolences on Passing of Uzbeki President

Sunday, September 4th, 2016

President Rivlin sent a letter of condolence Sunday to the people of Uzbekistan, expressing his condolences on the passing of the country’s president, Islam Karimov.

The long-time ruler was laid to rest Saturday in his hometown of Samarkand, at the Shah-i-Zinda cemetery, after a funeral in the city’s ancient Registan Square. About half of the nation’s 32 million citizens were born after Karimov came to power.

There is a tiny community of approximately 1,500 Bukharan Jews in Uzbekistan, most living in and around the capital city of Tashkent, the remnant after the majority made aliyah following the nation’s declaration of independence following the collapse of the former Soviet Union 25 years ago.

“On behalf of the citizens of the State of Israel, I send our condolences to the people of Uzbekistan on the death of President Islam Karimov, who has led the country since its independence,” Rivlin wrote. “Israel stands beside the Uzbek nation at this difficult time.

“We in Israel are very pleased with the good relations between our two countries and the cooperation between our two nations in a number of areas. We look forward to continuing to expand and to further enhance the good relations with Uzbekistan in the future.

“There have been strong Jewish communities in Uzbekistan for thousands of years and our two nations share a rich cultural history. We are proud of the many thousands of Israelis who immigrated here from Uzbekistan from such regions as Samarkand and Bukhara.

“Again, please accept our sympathies on the sad passing of President Islam Karimov,” he concluded.

Hana Levi Julian

Islam Karimov, Long-time Ruler of Uzbekistan, Hospitalized

Monday, August 29th, 2016

President Islam Karimov, the long-time ruler of of the former Soviet Republic of Uzbekistan was hospitalized Saturday, according to a cryptic statement issued by the Central Asian government.

“In the opinion of the specialists, a full medical examination and subsequent treatment will require a certain amount of time,” the statement read, according to the Regnum news agency, reporting from the capital, Tashkent.

The 78-year-old leader has led Uzbekistan for more than 25 years. A security ring several kilometers (two miles) deep was formed around the government hospital where he was admitted for treatment.

Uzbekistan is a relatively isolated nation of some 32 million people, located on the border of Afghanistan. The nation has been led by Karimov since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991.

The popular leader was re-elected to a five-year term just last year in a landslide victory with more than 90 percent of the vote. Karimov’s eldest daughter Gulnara was allegedly placed under house arrest in 2014, according to the BBC. His second daughter, Lola Karimova Tillyaeva, is the nation’s ambassador to UNESCO.

Uzbekistan holds a special place among Muslim nations with whom Israel enjoys friendly relations, in part due to the historical ties binding Ashkenazi Jews together with those of Bukharan origins. These bonds were further recognized and deepened last year when Karimov spoke at the opening ceremony of a special ethnic music festival in Samarkand, sometimes referred to as the ‘Eurovision of the East.’ He noted the event contributes to consolidating the “ties of friendship among nations, developing the cultural dialogue and preserving the traditions of classical music.” By the time the ninth festival was held, musicians from 53 nations were participating. Israel sent a delegation to the event as well.

Next Thursday, Sept. 1, the country marks its 25th Independence Day, and Karimov was expected to be in attendance as he has been every year. But according to unconfirmed reports quoted by the Ferganan news website and cited by the BBC, the president may have suffered a stroke.

Tashkent has taken a hard line against radical Islamist terror: many of those who belonged to the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan in the 1990s were “encouraged” to leave the country and have since joined the Taliban in Afghanistan. Some have since pledged allegiance to Da’esh (ISIS.) In 2005 they were accused of generating mass protests in the city of Andizhan, where Reuters reported 187 people were killed by police and security force gunfire.

Hana Levi Julian

Unfortunately, It Appears Nasrallah is Not Sick

Saturday, May 16th, 2015

After days of rumors claiming that Hezbollah Terror Chieftain Hassan Nasrallah had a stroke and was hospitalized, Nasrallah appeared on the Al-Manar TV station on Saturday night and disposed of those rumors.

He said he had no health problems and doesn’t require any medicine.

Oh well. Maybe next time.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Video Games Can Help in Stroke Rehab, Says Israeli Research

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

Common interactive video games may be  an affordable and effective alternative to traditional therapy for stroke victims, says Tel Aviv University’s Medical School Dr. Debbie Rand.

patients undergo hours of rehabilitation after a stroke to restore movement, speech, and overall functionality, but many still return home without the ability to perform daily tasks, such as dressing, cooking or driving.

Dr. Rand’s recent study, in collaboration with a team from Sheba Medical Center, found that people recovering from stroke who use video games as a therapeutic method are more physically active during rehabilitation sessions, making more movements overall than those who experience traditional motor therapy.

Interactive game consoles require players to move continuously to interact with the virtual games, Dr. Rand explains. In her study, not only did the players perform double the number of arm movements during each session compared to patients in traditional therapy, but all of their movements also were purposeful or “goal-directed” and not just repetitive exercises.

When individuals plan their movements and move deliberately in order to accomplish a specific goal, it is likely to have a positive impact on brain plasticity — changes in the brain that are crucial for recovery from brain damage caused by stroke, Dr. Rand notes.

Players’ movements require precision and balance, and there is a cognitive benefit in that video games require strategy and planning. The individuals are motivated and enjoy the activity, making it  more likely that they will continue the treatment regime long-term, she believes.

She tested the effectiveness of interactive video games compared to traditional therapy comparing individuals who had experienced a stroke one to seven years before the study began. They  were randomly assigned to one of two groups of 20 participants each — a traditional therapy group, who completed traditional rehabilitation exercises, and a video games group which played video games using Xbox Kinect, Sony PlayStation and Nintendo Wii gaming consoles. Each group received two sessions a week with occupational therapists for a period of three months.

Although both groups showed improvement in functions such as grip strength of their weaker and stronger hands and gait speed, participants in the video games group continued to improve their grip strength for three months following the intervention, while the traditional group did not.

Beyond the physical advantages, Dr. Rand believes that video games could be an excellent alternative to traditional therapy simply because they’re more fun. In the video game group, 92 percent of participants reported enjoying the experience “extremely” or “very much,” opposed to 72 percent of the traditional group.

If patients are enjoying the therapy experience, it’s more likely that they will adhere to the therapy regime long-term, noting that game consoles are now widely available and fairly inexpensive. Participants who were in the video game playing group reported: “It was lots of fun,” “it stimulated all of my senses,” and “I finished the sessions wet from sweat, which proves that I really worked hard.”

The group environment also contributed to the success of the therapy, Dr. Rand says. Often, individuals with stroke are isolated and don’t have a very active social life. This program allowed them to connect with people like themselves, and encourage and support one another’s efforts.

In future studies, she intends to investigate whether these interactive video games will be as effective if they are used independently by patients at home to keep up activity levels — a crucial element of rehabilitation following a stroke.

Tzvi Ben-Gedalyahu

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/video-games-can-help-in-stroke-rehab-says-israeli-research/2013/07/02/

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