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Polish Chasidic Student Returns to Poland For Pesach

Mati Pavlack, a rabbinic student studying at Yeshiva University, returned to Poland for Pesach to help the local population prepare and celebrate the holiday. Mati Pavlak is one of two young Jewish men from Poland who came to the U.S. to study for the rabbinate with the hopes of becoming full-time rabbis in their homeland. Mati Pavlack hopes to receive his ordination in the coming year. Mati Kos, the other Polish rabbinic student, was recently ordained at the Ohr Sameach Yeshiva in Monsey.



Polish Haggadah




For many years, professionally produced Jewish educational material for Polish Jews has been scarce. It has only been since the fall of the Communist regime that the Jews have been able to practice Judaism openly and freely. Four years ago the community, with the help of the Ronald S. Lauder Foundation, published the first Haggadah Shel Pesach since the Shoah exclusively for Polish Jews. Along with the traditional text and Polish translation there is a well-thought out commentary and guide to the laws of Pesach written by Rabbi Sacha Pecaric. Rabbi Pecaric had worked for the Lauder Foundation in Krakow, where he produced much of the Jewish educational material used by the various Jewish communities in Poland. The material includes a set of Chumashim, a guide to learning the Talmud, a book on the 613 commandments, a Zimiron for Shabbat and festivals as well as other much needed practical items. Before the Shoah it was rare to find Jewish books translated into Polish, as Hebrew or Yiddish was the language of most of the Jews, but today there is a need for Polish translation, commentaries and even transliteration.


‘Chasidic Jewish Trail’ In Poland


Polish groups are developing a tourism route tracing the country’s Orthodox Jewish past. The Institute for the Preservation of Jewish Culture and the Carpathia Institute are developing the project, according to the Polish newspaper Gazeta Wyborcza. The trip will pass through towns that were centers of chasidic Judaism. Plans are to extend the trail into Ukraine and perhaps other countries.


Toronto Synagogue To Be Modeled After Polish Shul









A Toronto congregation plans to model its new synagogue after a destroyed shul in Poland. The Forest Hill Jewish Centre, a 100-family congregation whose current home is in a low-rise office above a Starbucks, plans to build a new synagogue that will recreate the exterior of a synagogue in the town of Jaslo that was destroyed by the Nazis.

 

“Putting up this building is really an opportunity for us to tell ourselves and the world that the spirit of Judaism will never die,” said Rabbi Elie Karfunkel, the congregation’s spiritual leader. The building is expected to cost $9 million. The congregation hopes to break ground next year and move in to the building in about two years.

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The official beginning of World War II was September 1, 1939. On that day German soldiers invaded Gdansk after bombarding the city with a military warship. As part of the Polish Government’s official series of events marking seven decades since the start of World War II, Poland’s Jewish community and the Jerusalem-based “Shavei Israel” organization held a special ceremony yesterday in the Gdansk synagogue to commemorate the outbreak of the war, which paved the way for the Holocaust.

The official beginning of World War II was September 1, 1939. On that day German soldiers invaded Gdansk after bombarding the city with a military warship. As part of the Polish Government’s official series of events marking seven decades since the start of World War II, Poland’s Jewish community and the Jerusalem-based “Shavei Israel” organization held a special ceremony yesterday in the Gdansk synagogue to commemorate the outbreak of the war, which paved the way for the Holocaust.

September 1, 1939 is the date on which Germany invaded Poland, starting WWII. While it should be said that the start of the war was not the start of the Shoah, which actually began with the rise of Nazism in 1933, it was a major milestone in the annals of the Holocaust. Within the first few days of the war, Germany had conquered and/or bombed much of Poland, including the capital, Warsaw.

September 1, 1939 is the date on which Germany invaded Poland, starting WWII. While it should be said that the start of the war was not the start of the Shoah, which actually began with the rise of Nazism in 1933, it was a major milestone in the annals of the Holocaust. Within the first few days of the war, Germany had conquered and/or bombed much of Poland, including the capital, Warsaw.

In September 1939 the Germans started establishing ghettos in the occupied territory of Poland. Ghettos played an important role in the Jewish extermination policy. They were filled with Polish and Western European Jewish deportees. The ghettos differed in times of existence, size, internal organization, and living conditions. The Germans called them ” death boxes” (Todeskiste). The city of Lodz belonged to the Wartheland District and the Germans changed its name into Litzmannstadt.

In September 1939 the Germans started establishing ghettos in the occupied territory of Poland. Ghettos played an important role in the Jewish extermination policy. They were filled with Polish and Western European Jewish deportees. The ghettos differed in times of existence, size, internal organization, and living conditions. The Germans called them ” death boxes” (Todeskiste). The city of Lodz belonged to the Wartheland District and the Germans changed its name into Litzmannstadt.

Growing up in the U.S. during the second half of the 20th century, I, along with most people, know very little about the First World War. The little that I did know was about the trench warfare in France and Belgium. The Eastern Front was barely, if ever, mentioned and usually stated that it ended with the Russian Revolution and overthrowing the Czar.

Growing up in the U.S. during the second half of the 20th century, I, along with most people, know very little about the First World War. The little that I did know was about the trench warfare in France and Belgium. The Eastern Front was barely, if ever, mentioned and usually stated that it ended with the Russian Revolution and overthrowing the Czar.

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