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Persian Chicken With Mint, Parsley & Dried Fruit

               This colorful Persian Chicken dish with mint, parsley and dried fruit is perfect for Passover as it is easy to prepare and ideal when you have extra guests.  As I use the breast of chicken, there is no carving involved and serving is straightforward. The recipe is cooked in a delicious flavored turmeric stock, so should your Seder go on for longer than expected, the chicken will not dry out. Sephardim would tend to serve it with rice, but in my Ashkenazi household, I serve it with roasted potatoes.


 


Preparation Time: 15 minutes; Cooking Time: 40 minutes; Serves 6


 


Ingredients


1 cup dried apricots cut into strips


1 cup dried cherries or cranberries


1 cup water


3 tablespoons olive oil


2 large onions, chopped


1- 2 teaspoons turmeric


Large bunch of chives – chopped


Large bunch of mint leaves – chopped


Large bunch of parsley – chopped


2 cups chicken stock or water


6 chicken breasts – boneless and skinless cut into 1-1/2-inch chunks


Salt and freshly ground black pepper – to taste


 


Garnish: Flat leaf parsley


 


Method


1. Place dried fruit in medium bowl and cover with water and then cover bowl with plastic film. Place in the microwave for 2 minutes to soften.


2. In a large skillet, heat the oil. Cook onion until soft, about 5 minutes and then stir in turmeric and chicken pieces. Cook over a medium-high heat – about 2 minutes, or until fragrant.


3. Add the stock, bring to a boil and cook about 15 minutes.


4. Add the fruit, soaking liquid, herbs and simmer for a final 15 minutes.


5. Taste and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

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