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August 30, 2014 / 4 Elul, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Rabbi Shimshon Nadel’

Destroying the Chametz Within and Truly Preparing for Pesach

Monday, April 14th, 2014

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Yishai is joined by Rabbi Shimshon HaKohen Nadel to discuss Pesach and the preparations for the holiday. Listen in as the two discuss the sometimes craziness behind getting ready for Pesach and different ideas and thoughts behind how one can get ready and also see the preparations as not only physical but mental and spiritual. Listen in to this interesting and insightful segment!

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
Yishai on Facebook

Purim Insight with Rabbi Shimshon HaKohen Nadel

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

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Yishai provides uplifting discussion about meanings behind the holiday of Purim with Rabbi Shimshon HaKohen Nadel. Together, they kick off talking about how it is imperative to bring awareness to the Land of Israel into the consciousness and how it relates to the story of Purim. They move on and end talking about Rabbi Nadel’s recommendations about how to celebrate Purim to the fullest extent.

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
Yishai on Facebook

Rabbi Nadel on the Torah Significance of Yom Haatzmaut

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

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Yishai interviews Rabbi Shimshon Nadel on a bustling Jerusalem street to talk about the Torah significance of the Yom Haatzmaut. Listen in as Yishai and Rabbi Nadel talk about celebration of Israel’s independence by both secular and ultra-Orthodox Jews and how there are many, even in the most Haredi communities that are still filled with joy during Independence Day.

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
Yishai on Facebook

Above and Beyond on Chanukah in 5773

Friday, December 7th, 2012

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Yishai is joined by Rabbi Shimshon Nadel in a busy Jerusalem restaurant to discuss Chanukah in Eretz Yisrael. Together they discuss reaching out to Jews worldwide from Israel during the holiday and also ways one can find the light of the menorah at year round. Don’t miss this insightful segment!

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
Yishai on Facebook

Tal Law And Jewish Law – Is There A Conflict?

Wednesday, June 20th, 2012

In February, Israel’s Supreme Court ruled the Tal Law discriminatory and unconstitutional in a vote of six to three. The law, which provides exemptions for young men studying in yeshiva full time, has been the subject of much criticism and controversy.

Advocates of maintaining the status quo argue that those studying Torah provide a spiritual protection to the state of Israel. They also believe Jewish Law requires exemptions for yeshiva students.

But what does Jewish law really require?

The Mishnah (Sotah 8:7) states: “…In a milchemet mitzvah, all go out [to war], even a groom from his room and a bride from her wedding canopy.” While many explain that women are exempt from combat, they are to assist by “providing food and fixing roads” (Tiferet Yisrael, ad loc.), for example. By including bride and groom, based on Yoel 2:16, the Mishnah emphasizes that all are required to participate in the war effort, without exception.

Rambam defines a milchemet mitzvah as, “war [against] the Seven Nations, war [against] Amalek, and assisting Israel from the hand of the enemy who comes up against them” (Hil. Melachim 5:1). This last definition informs our discussion. With a nuclear threat from Iran looming, enemy states on the borders, and the constant threat of terrorism within, anyone who is intellectually honest must admit that Israelis find themselves embroiled in a milchemet mitzvah, a national security situation that demands the help of all.

Those who advocate exemptions for students studying Torah full time also find support in the Rambam’s Mishneh Torah. Rambam writes at the end of Hilchot Shemitta v’Yovel that the tribe of Levi is exempt from going to war as they are the “army of Hashem,” so to speak. They do not inherit a portion in the Land and their material needs are provided for. They are the spiritual leaders of the Jewish people.

Rambam adds: “And not only the tribe of Levi, but also each and every individual whose spirit moves him and whose knowledge gives him understanding to set himself apart in order to stand before the Lord, to serve Him, to worship Him and to know Him, and releases his neck from the yoke of the many considerations that men are wont to pursue – such an individual is consecrated as the Holy of Holies, and his portion and inheritance shall be in the Lord forever and ever….”

Rambam allows for anyone “whose spirit moves him” to devote himself solely to Torah study, free from the burden of army service and divorced of all material concerns.

But this passage is problematic. Later commentaries struggle to find a Talmudic source for Rambam’s ruling. Some suggest the passage is based on Nedarim 32a, where our patriarch Avraham is criticized for drafting Torah scholars in the War of the Four Kings against the Five. Others point to Sotah 10a, which describes how King Asa was punished for mobilizing talmidei chachamim.

What is clear is that Rambam’s ruling here is not the rule but the exception. His allowance is for a select few individuals who are able to devote themselves wholly to avodat Hashem. Rabbi Aharon Lichtenstein asks, “To how large a segment of the Torah community – or, a fortiori, of any community – does this lofty typology apply? To two percent? Five percent? Can anyone who negotiates the terms of salary, perhaps even naden or kest or both, confront a mirror and tell himself that he ought not go to the army because he is kodesh kodashim, sanctum sanctorum in the Rambam’s terms?”

Exempting entire sectors of the Jewish community from army service and from pursuing a parnassah is not what the Rambam intended.

In the early days of statehood, when Rabbi Avraham Yeshaya Karelitz, the famed Chazon Ish, and other leading rabbis reached a compromise with David Ben-Gurion to provide military exemptions for yeshiva students, only 400 were exempted. Writing about a milchemet mitzvah, the Chazon Ish himself recognized that “if there is a need for them, they must come to the aid of their brethren” (Orach Chaim, Eiruvin, no. 114). Today, the number of exemptions has grown to well over 60,000. How the words of the Chazon Ish ring true today.

Those who do not serve in the IDF claim exemption under the guise of Toratan omanutan, their complete commitment to Torah study. But the real issue is not one of halacha. The truth is that for many, the insistence on exemption is out of convenience. Yet others are motivated by anti-Zionism. They do not want to recognize the state of Israel or serve in its army. But halacha requires some form of service for everyone. No exceptions. No exemptions.

Jewish Press Radio with Yishai Fleisher: More than just a flag

Thursday, May 17th, 2012

More than just a flag

With Shavuot rapidly approaching, the managing editor of the Jewish Press online, Yishai Fleisher, broadcasts the second segment from Beit Knesset Dati Leumi in Jerusalem and is joined by Rabbi Shimshon Nadel. Together, they talk about Yom Yerushalayim, the holiday that commemorates the reunification of Jerusalem during the Six Day War of 1967. Rabbi Nadel talks about his feelings regarding the Israeli flag and it’s importance to him. The two move on to talk about the observance of holidays and how some are more important and we end this segment with Yishai and Rabbi Nadel talking about Aliyah Day.

Jewish Press Radio: Migron Resident, “I Had To Teach My Children Not To Hate Our Own Police”

Wednesday, April 4th, 2012

Segment #1:  Crunch Time is here 

It’s crunch time as Pesach is rapidly approaching and we kick off this week’s show with Yishai, being joined by his friend and colleague, Rabbi Shimshon Nadel.  Together, they discuss the intensity of not only cleaning one’s home for the holiday but also the importance of taking time to look inside during the holiday.  Yishai talks about his recent experience baking matzo and also his personal connection to the baking of unleavened bread along with how the Pesach holiday should be used as a time to deflate oneself and reevaluate.  Rabbi Nadel and Yishai talk about how Passover Seder should be rethought and how it should become less of a textual event and more one of true feeling of fire and night.  Halachic questions such as how to lean to the left comfortably during the Seder are mentioned and the first segment ends with Yishai talking about Pesach being a pilgrimage holiday and how important it is for the consciousness that Jerusalem is the center of the Jewish universe to exist in the hearts and minds of the Jewish People.

Segment #2:  A Jewish Heart From the Windy City

In the second segment of this week’s show, the current state of the Jewish people in the United States is explained and analyzed and to do that, Yishai is joined by Jack Berger, a self-described “Jew from Chicago” who has spanned the spectrum when it comes to all things Jewish in The Windy City.  Topics for this segment include how younger Jews, especially in more liberal movements, are becoming less and less connected to both Judaism and Israel, how large Jewish institutions are being built in cities in North America where there currently is little Anti-Semitism but where it could crop up in the near future, and how if one wants to support a large and thriving Jewish community, they should support the largest and most thriving, which is in the State of Israel.  The thought that the current generation will be the one that allows Jonathan Pollard to die in captivity in a United States prison is discussed, including how Pollard was almost released and how important it is to ensure that his release happens sooner rather than later.  Yishai talks about the issue of Jerusalem and how it is not considered the capitol of Israel in the eyes of the United States government and how this can be corrected in the future.

Segment #3:  It’s Not Good to Hate

The beautiful community of Migron sits upon the rolling hills of the Benyamin region of Samaria and this week’s third segment is focused on how this community has become a hot topic across Israel.  Yishai presents three main reasons to why it is such an important issue and to reinforce why those reasons are important.  Aviela Deitch, a Migron resident and a spokesperson for the community, who resides in the community with her husband and six children, joins Yishai.  Deitch talks about the reasons that they decided to move to Migron and also the experience of an expulsion, as it was seen first-hand.  Deitch talks about the history of the community of Migron, how it is not usable farmland and how the land was formerly state land owned by the the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, which became Israeli property following the Six Day War in 1967.  Deitch continues by talking about how the community was established with not only the blessing of the Israeli government but also with full support including utilities and mobile homes.   Issues with the lawsuit brought forth by Peace Now, a leftist Israeli organization, that catapulted Migron into the limelight are discussed as are the some of the dubious legal proceedings that have happened between the citizens of Migron and the Israeli Supreme Court.  The segment ends with Yishai talking about the potential expulsion of the residents of Migron set to take place this summer and how it will affect the Deitch family and others that live in this community.

Segment #4: Reconnecting heart and mind

This week’s show is wrapped up with Yishai presenting a recent speech, given by his friend and colleague Yehuda HaKohen at Machon Meir Yeshiva in Jerusalem.   Topics include how the Jewish people were not expelled to the four corners of the Earth but rather to five, the fifth being Zion.  The thought that a Zionist is not only one who loves his homeland but also his brothers and sisters are presented as is how Theodor Herzl and other Zionist leaders restored the heart to the Jewish People by bringing Jews home.  The thought of the curse of fear is discussed and explained throughout this segment.  The segment and the show ends with HaKohen emphasizing lucky we are to live in the time we live in the history of the Jewish People and how love can be the most empowering trait a human can exhibit.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/jewish-press-radio-crunch-time-windy-city-jew-migron-insider-reconnecting-heart-and-mind/2012/04/04/

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